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Your search for courses for 21/SP and with code: ENGLFORLIT found 4 courses.

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Instructional Modes

Course instruction will be delivered in one of four modes:

  • Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction — (only students physically on campus can enroll)
  • Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction — (only students physically on campus can enroll)
  • Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person — (can enroll students both on-campus and remote)
  • Online a web-based course that meets virtually — courses meet either synchronously, meaning the course meets primarily at specifically-scheduled times, or asynchronously, meaning the course may have occasional scheduled meeting times but is primarily offered without real-time, scheduled interaction — assignments are generally due with specific deadlines and exams may be conducted at specific times — (can enroll students both on-campus and remote)

ARBC 144.00 Arabic Literature at War 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59942

Zaki A Haidar

Arabic literature is a vibrant and humane tradition. At the same time, several Arab societies have experienced periods of exceedingly violent conflict throughout the twentieth and into the twenty-first centuries. In this course, we will investigate the ways these two currents—war and the literary—converge in several Arab societies. As members of societies at war, but also as literary artists, how do authors represent these conflicting narratives? What sorts of war stories do they tell, how do they tell them, and what sort of literary practice is produced? We will study the birth of the Lebanese Civil War novel as a bona fide genre in the 1970s and 80s, how literature informed anti-colonial struggles in Palestine and Algeria from the 1950s to the present, and read some works of genre-bending horror and science fiction that have appeared in the wake of Iraq’s recent destruction. Taught in English, no knowledge of Arabic is required.

In translation

CHIN 364.00 Chinese Classic Tales and Modern Adaptation 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57837

Shaohua Guo

This course introduces to students influential Chinese classic tales and their modern adaptation across media platforms. Students improve their listening and speaking skills through viewing and discussing visual materials. Students develop their reading and writing proficiencies through analyzing authentic texts, formulating their own arguments, and writing critical essays. The overarching goal of this course is to increase students’ fluency in all aspects of Chinese language learning and to deepen students’ understanding of the role that cultural tradition plays in shaping China’s present.

Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or equivalent (students who have taken one 300-level course at Carleton are qualified to register)

FREN 241.00 The Lyric and Other Seductions 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59282

Scott D Carpenter

French lyric poetry occupies a privileged position in the literary landscape of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. However, it also shares a common heritage with less literary siblings, such as popular music and even advertising. Starting with the study of such poets as Lamartine, Desbordes-Valmore, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Valéry, and Bonnefoy, we will also investigate poetic techniques in popular songs and contemporary ads. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

SPAN 366.00 Jorge Luis Borges: Less a Man Than a Vast and Complex Literature 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59328

Jorge Brioso

Borges once said about Quevedo that he was less a man than a vast and complex literature. This phrase is probably the best definition for Borges as well. We will discuss the many writers encompassed by Borges: the vanguard writer, the poet, the detective short story writer, the fantastic story writer, the essayist. We will also study his many literary masks: H. Bustoc Domecq (the apocryphal writer he created with Bioy Casares) a pseudonym he used to write chronicles and detective stories. We will study his impact on contemporary writers and philosophers such as Foucault, Derrida, Roberto Bolaño, etc.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

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