ENROLL Course Search

Saved Courses (0)

Your search for courses for 21/SP and with code: POSI-AREAS2 found 12 courses.

Revise Your Search New Search

Instructional Modes

Course instruction will be delivered in one of four modes:

  • Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction — (only students physically on campus can enroll)
  • Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction — (only students physically on campus can enroll)
  • Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person — (can enroll students both on-campus and remote)
  • Online a web-based course that meets virtually — courses meet either synchronously, meaning the course meets primarily at specifically-scheduled times, or asynchronously, meaning the course may have occasional scheduled meeting times but is primarily offered without real-time, scheduled interaction — assignments are generally due with specific deadlines and exams may be conducted at specific times — (can enroll students both on-campus and remote)

ARBC 144.00 Arabic Literature at War 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59942

Zaki A Haidar

Arabic literature is a vibrant and humane tradition. At the same time, several Arab societies have experienced periods of exceedingly violent conflict throughout the twentieth and into the twenty-first centuries. In this course, we will investigate the ways these two currents—war and the literary—converge in several Arab societies. As members of societies at war, but also as literary artists, how do authors represent these conflicting narratives? What sorts of war stories do they tell, how do they tell them, and what sort of literary practice is produced? We will study the birth of the Lebanese Civil War novel as a bona fide genre in the 1970s and 80s, how literature informed anti-colonial struggles in Palestine and Algeria from the 1950s to the present, and read some works of genre-bending horror and science fiction that have appeared in the wake of Iraq’s recent destruction. Taught in English, no knowledge of Arabic is required.

In translation

EUST 249.00 The European Union from Constitution to Crisis 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58768

Paul Petzschmann

It has become commonplace to say that Europe is in crisis--yet what does that mean? It is difficult to overestimate the importance of crises considering that the European Union played a large part in overcoming Europe’s “Long Civil War” between 1914 and 1945. The collective decision-making processes created by European treaties are often credited with bringing peace and prosperity to Europe. Yet they have also instituted idiosyncrasies, asymmetries and inequities that stand in the way of solving the continent’s most pressing problems. We will examine decision-making processes in the European Union and the much-debated “democratic deficit” of its institutions. These debates about the foundations of the Union will be rounded off by an overview and brief history of Euroscepticism. The course will include a discussion of a number of case studies that confront member states of the European Union across the board: the reconstruction of the welfare state, immigration and the refugee crisis, and the rise of the far right. 

HIST 139.00 Foundations of Modern Europe 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 5

Weitz Center 236 / Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59759

Susannah R Ottaway

A narrative and survey of the early modern period (fifteenth through eighteenth centuries). The course examines the Renaissance, Reformation, Contact with the Americas, the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. We compare the development of states and societies across Western Europe, with particularly close examination of the history of Spain.

HIST 153.00 Modern China: China with Mao 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57813

Seungjoo Yoon

This survey course of twentieth-century China examines how ordinary people interacted with Mao, the chief architect of Communist China. We will scrutinize social change over time by looking at patterns of contestations and negotiations between Mao and his rivals among peasants, workers, students, women, intellectuals, ethnic minorities, and local cadres. Topics include the operation of the new democracy, social classification and distribution, food and famine politics, the changing meaning of family and education, body and biomedicine, mass science and archaeological projects, and Mao’s exhibition culture. Students will engage with images, memoirs, autobiographies, interviews, oral histories, films, “garbage materials,” and archival sources.

HIST 183.00 History of Early West Africa 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 5

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58972

Thabiti C Willis

This course surveys the history of West Africa during the pre-colonial period from 790 to 1590. It chronicles the rise and fall of the kingdoms of Ancient Ghana, Mali, and Songhai. We will examine the transition from decentralized to centralized societies, the relations between nomadic and settler groups, the institution of divine kingship, the emergence of new ruling dynasties, the consolidation of trade networks, and the development of the classical Islamic world. Students will learn how scholars have used archeological evidence, African oral traditions, and the writings of Muslim travelers to reconstruct this important era of West African history.

HIST 240.00 Tsars and Serfs, Cossacks and Revolutionaries: The Empire that was Russia 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 7

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 58974

Adeeb Khalid

Nicholas II, the last Tsar-Emperor of Russia, ruled over an empire that stretched from the Baltic to the Pacific. Territorial expansion over three-and-a-half centuries had brought under Russian rule a vast empire of immense diversity. The empire's subjects spoke a myriad languages, belonged to numerous religious communities, and related to the state in a wide variety of ways. Its artists produced some of the greatest literature and music of the nineteenth century and it offered fertile ground for ideologies of both conservative imperialism and radical revolution. This course surveys the panorama of this empire from its inception in the sixteenth century to its demise in the flames of World War I. Among the key analytical questions addressed are the following: How did the Russian Empire manage its diversity? How does Russia compare with other colonial empires? What understandings of political order legitimized it and how were they challenged?

HIST 383.00 Africa's Colonial Legacies 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58978

Thabiti C Willis

This course deepens understanding of the causes, manifestations, and implications of warfare in modern Africa by highlighting African perspectives on colonialism's legacies. Drawing from cases in South Africa, Uganda, Kenya, Algeria, and Sudan, the course questions whether Britain's policy of indirect rule, France's direct rule, and South Africa's apartheid rule were variants of despotism and how colonial rule shaped possibilities of resistance, reform, and repression. Students also will learn how different historical actors participated in and experienced war as well as produce an original research paper that thoughtfully uses primary and secondary resources. 

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 2

Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 58857

Krissy K Lunz Trujillo

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 264.00 Politics of Contemporary China 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58872

Kent Freeze

This course examines the political, social and economic transformation of China over the past thirty years. Students will explore the transformation of the countryside from a primarily agricultural society into the factory of the world. Particular emphasis will be placed on economic development and how this has changed state-society relations at the grassroots. The class will explore these changes among farmers, the working class and the emerging middle class. Students will also explore how the Chinese Communist Party has survived and even thrived while many other Communist regimes have fallen and assess the relationship between economic development and democratization.

POSC 324.00 Rebels and Risk Takers: Women and War in the Middle East* 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 6

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm9:30pm7:00pm9:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58873

Summer N Forester

How are women (and gender more broadly) shaping and shaped by war and conflict in the Middle East? Far from the trope of the subjugated, veiled, and abused Middle Eastern woman, women in the Middle East are active social and political agents. In wars and conflicts in the Middle East region, women have, for example, been combatants, soldiers, activists, spies, homemakers, writers, and political leaders. This course surveys conflicts involving Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Israel, Jordan, and Iraq--along with Western powers like the U.S., UK, and Australia--through the wartime experiences of women.

RELG 152.00 Religions in Japanese Culture 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 11

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59738

Asuka Sango

An introduction to the major religious traditions of Japan, from earliest times to the present. Combining thematic and historical approaches, this course will scrutinize both defining characteristics of, and interactions among, various religious traditions, including worship of the kami (local deities), Buddhism, shamanistic practices, Christianity, and new religious movements. We also will discuss issues crucial in the study of religion, such as the relation between religion and violence, gender, modernity, nationalism and war.

SOAN 353.00 Ethnography of Latin America 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 2

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59035

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

This course explores the origins and development of contemporary lived experiences in Latin America as interpreted through ethnographic works in anthropology. We will examine and analyze the structural processes that have shaped contact among indigenous, European, and non-European immigrants (e.g. African and Asian peoples) in Latin America since the Conquest and through colonial periods to understand today's Latin American societies. We will pay special attention to the impacts of global capitalist expansion and state formation, sites of resilience and resistance, as well as the movement of Latin American peoples throughout the world today. Course themes will address gender, identity, social organization, indigeneity, immigration, social inequality and environment.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

Not open to students who have taken SOAN 250

Search for Courses

This data updates hourly. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the Search for Classes option in The Hub

Instructional Mode
Select one or more instructional modes that your residential situation will allow you to attend.
Class Period
Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests