ENROLL Course Search

Saved Courses (0)

Your search for courses for 21/SP and with Overlay: IS found 64 courses.

Revise Your Search New Search

Instructional Modes

Course instruction will be delivered in one of four modes:

  • Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction — (only students physically on campus can enroll)
  • Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction — (only students physically on campus can enroll)
  • Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person — (can enroll students both on-campus and remote)
  • Online a web-based course that meets virtually — courses meet either synchronously, meaning the course meets primarily at specifically-scheduled times, or asynchronously, meaning the course may have occasional scheduled meeting times but is primarily offered without real-time, scheduled interaction — assignments are generally due with specific deadlines and exams may be conducted at specific times — (can enroll students both on-campus and remote)

AFST 130.00 Global Islam and Blackness 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57855

Ahmed S Ibrahim

This course will introduce students to key trends and moments in Islamic thought and activism in Africa and the black diaspora. It explores the historical construction of the categories of “race” and “religion” through a focus on Islam and blackness. We will analyze how blackness and Islam, and their relationship, has been conceptualized and presented by non-Africans, as well as the history of Islam in Africa and in the black diaspora. We will explore the construction of blackness within Islamic history and cultures, highlighting the notion of the Moor in medieval times and the Nation of Islam in U.S. history.

ARBC 144.00 Arabic Literature at War 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59942

Zaki A Haidar

Arabic literature is a vibrant and humane tradition. At the same time, several Arab societies have experienced periods of exceedingly violent conflict throughout the twentieth and into the twenty-first centuries. In this course, we will investigate the ways these two currents—war and the literary—converge in several Arab societies. As members of societies at war, but also as literary artists, how do authors represent these conflicting narratives? What sorts of war stories do they tell, how do they tell them, and what sort of literary practice is produced? We will study the birth of the Lebanese Civil War novel as a bona fide genre in the 1970s and 80s, how literature informed anti-colonial struggles in Palestine and Algeria from the 1950s to the present, and read some works of genre-bending horror and science fiction that have appeared in the wake of Iraq’s recent destruction. Taught in English, no knowledge of Arabic is required.

In translation

ARBC 222.00 Music in the Middle East 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59204

Yaron Klein

The Middle East is home to a great number of musical styles, genres, and traditions. Regional, ideological, and cultural diversity, national identity, and cross-cultural encounters--all express themselves in music. We will explore some of the many musical traditions in the Arab world, from early twentieth century to the present. Class discussions based on readings in English and guided listening. No prior music knowledge required, but interested students with or without musical background can participate in an optional, hands-on Arab music performance workshop, on Western or a few (provided) Middle Eastern instruments throughout the term.

ARBC 371.00 Readings in Premodern Arabic Science 3 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59206

Yaron Klein

It is difficult to overstate Arab scientists' contribution to science. A translation movement from Greek, Persian and Sanskrit into Arabic initiated in the eighth century, led to centuries of innovative scientific investigation, during which Arab scientists reshaped science in a variety of disciplines: from mathematics to astronomy, physics, optics and medicine. Many of their works entered Latin and the European curriculum during the Renaissance. In this reading course we will explore some of the achievements and thought processes in premodern Arabic scientific literature by reading selections from several seminal works. We will examine these in the cultural contexts in which they emerged and to which they contributed, and reflect on modern Western perceptions of this intellectual project. Readings and class discussions will be in both Arabic and English.

Prerequisite: Arabic 206 or equivalent

ARTH 166.00 Chinese Art and Culture 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 5

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57979

Kathleen M Ryor

This course will survey art and architecture in China from its prehistoric beginnings to the end of the nineteenth century. It will examine various types of visual art forms within their social, political and cultural contexts. Major themes that will also be explored include: the role of ritual in the production and use of art, the relationship between the court and secular elite and art, and theories about creativity and expression.

ARTH 220.00 The Origins of Manga: Japanese Prints 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 11

Boliou 104

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59914

Kathleen M Ryor

Pictures of the floating world, or ukiyoe, were an integral part of popular culture in Japan and functioned as illustrations, advertisements, and souvenirs. This course will examine the development of both style and subject matter in Japanese prints within the socio-economic context of the seventeenth through twentieth centuries. Emphasis will be placed on the prominent position of women and the nature of gendered activity in these prints.

ARTH 236.00 Baroque Art 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 3

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 57980

Jessica F Keating

This course examines European artistic production in Italy, Spain, France, and the Netherlands from the end of the sixteenth century through the seventeenth century. The aim of the course is to interrogate how religious revolution and reformation, scientific discoveries, and political transformations brought about a proliferation of remarkably varied types of artistic production that permeated and altered the sacred, political, and private spheres. The class will examine in depth select works of painting, sculpture, prints, and drawings, by Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velázquez, Rubens, and Rembrandt, among many others.

CAMS 212.00 Contemporary Spanish Cinema 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 2

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58142

Jay S Beck

This course serves as a historical and critical survey of Spanish cinema from the early 1970s to the present. Topics of study will include the redefinition of Spanish identity in the post-Franco era, the rewriting of national history through cinema, cinematic representations of gender and sexuality, emergent genres, regional cinemas and identities, stars and transnational film projects, and new Spanish auteurs from the 1980s to the present.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CCST 180.00 Crossing Borders: Global Contexts of Migration and Immigration 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57958

David G Tompkins

This course will grapple with the issue of immigration and migration from both global and interdisciplinary perspectives. Through several different case studies (including such regions as the Americas, Africa, Europe, and more), taught by faculty from different departments, students will gain a deeper understanding of one of the burning issues of our time.

CHIN 252.00 The Chinese Language: A Linguistic and Cultural Survey 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57965

Lin Deng

This course offers a unique introduction to the Chinese language for anyone curious about its defining characteristics and how they shaped, impacted, or relate to certain social, political, and cultural practices and traditions in China, present and past. This course will prepare students with the knowledge to make informed judgment on common misconceptions or prejudices, by non-Chinese and Chinese speakers, concerning the Chinese language or its writing system. Students are expected to learn about some general linguistic concepts and notions in regard to structural features of human language and its relationship with mind, society, and culture through this course. No prior knowledge of Chinese or linguistics is required.

In Translation

CLAS 215.00 Ancient Greek and Roman Sexuality 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 57828

Kirk W Ormand

In this course we will question whether or not the ancient Greeks and Romans defined “sexuality” by object-choice, whether they understood sexuality as an integral component of one’s personal identity, and whether they had a concept of “sexuality” as we currently understand it. Emphasis will be on primary texts that demonstrate notions of sexual normativity and/or identity, such as Aristophanes’ Thesmophoriazousae, Plato’s Symposium, Aeschines’ Against Timarchos, and poetry of Sappho, Catullus, Ovid, Martial, and Juvenal. We will also read modern critical theorists (Foucault, Halperin, Richlin, Winkler), and will interrogate their arguments.

ENGL 238.00 African Literature in English 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58936

Kofi Owusu

This is a course on texts drawn from English-speaking Africa since the 1950's. Authors to be read include Chinua Achebe, Ama Ata Aidoo, Ayi Kwei Armah, Buchi Emecheta, Bessie Head, Benjamin Kwakye, and Wole Soyinka.

ENGL 245.00 Bollywood Nation 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 2

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58937

Arnab Chakladar

This course will serve as an introduction to Bollywood or popular Hindi cinema from India. We will trace the history of this cinema and analyze its formal components. We will watch and discuss some of the most celebrated and popular films of the last 60 years with particular emphasis on urban thrillers and social dramas.

ENGL 350.00 The Postcolonial Novel: Forms and Contexts 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59941

Arnab Chakladar

Authors from the colonies and ex-colonies of England have complicated our understandings of the locations, forms and indeed the language of the contemporary English novel. This course will examine these questions and the theoretical and interpretive frames in which these writers have often been placed, and probe their place in the global marketplace (and awards stage). We will read a number of major novelists of the postcolonial era from Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and the diaspora as well as some of the central works of postcolonial literary criticism.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one additional 6 credit English course

ENTS 212.00 Global Food Systems 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 3

Online Course

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59918

Tsegaye H Nega

The course offers a survey of the world's food systems--and its critics--from the initial domestication of plants and animals to our day. We will begin by examining the critical theoretical and foundational issues on the subject, and then turn to a series of case studies that illuminate major themes around the world. Topics will include land and animal husbandry, the problem of food security, food politics, the Green Revolution, biotechnology, and the implications of global climate change. Throughout the course, students will assess and seek to integrate differing disciplinary and methodological approaches. The class will include field experiences.

ENTS 244.00 Biodiversity Conservation and Development 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 1

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59917

Tsegaye H Nega

How can the need for intensive human social and economic development be reconciled with the conservation of biodiversity? This course explores the wide range of actions that people take at a local, national, and international level to address this question. We will use political ecology and conservation biology as theoretical frameworks to examine the role of traditional and indigenous approaches to biodiversity conservation as well as contemporary debates about integrated conservation development across a spectrum of cultures in North America, Africa, Latin America, and Asia.

EUST 249.00 The European Union from Constitution to Crisis 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58768

Paul Petzschmann

It has become commonplace to say that Europe is in crisis--yet what does that mean? It is difficult to overestimate the importance of crises considering that the European Union played a large part in overcoming Europe’s “Long Civil War” between 1914 and 1945. The collective decision-making processes created by European treaties are often credited with bringing peace and prosperity to Europe. Yet they have also instituted idiosyncrasies, asymmetries and inequities that stand in the way of solving the continent’s most pressing problems. We will examine decision-making processes in the European Union and the much-debated “democratic deficit” of its institutions. These debates about the foundations of the Union will be rounded off by an overview and brief history of Euroscepticism. The course will include a discussion of a number of case studies that confront member states of the European Union across the board: the reconstruction of the welfare state, immigration and the refugee crisis, and the rise of the far right. 

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59279

Cathy Yandell

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 59280)

FREN 241.00 The Lyric and Other Seductions 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59282

Scott D Carpenter

French lyric poetry occupies a privileged position in the literary landscape of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. However, it also shares a common heritage with less literary siblings, such as popular music and even advertising. Starting with the study of such poets as Lamartine, Desbordes-Valmore, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Valéry, and Bonnefoy, we will also investigate poetic techniques in popular songs and contemporary ads. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 307.00 The French Art of Living Well 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59427

Cathy Yandell

Why is “la joie de vivre” inseparable from the idea French culture? Recognizing that there are as many definitions of what constitutes “la joie de vivre” as there are French speakers in the world, this course will explore and interrogate various approaches to defining--and living--the good life. Philosophers, writers, podcasts, videos, and songs will inform our analyses, from Montaigne to the present.

Prerequisite: One course beyond French 204

GERM 223.00 Thinking Green: Sustainability, Literature, and Culture in Germany 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 1

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57893

Kiley Kost

Germany is a recognized worldwide leader in environmental movements thanks to the nuclear power phase-out, the renewable energy transition, and the rise of the Green Party. Similarly, there is a long aesthetic tradition depicting nature and the nonhuman world in German-language literature and poetry. In this course, conducted in English, we will trace the development of contemporary Germany’s environmental practices through its literary and cultural legacy by reading and analyzing texts from established writers and thinkers. We will connect these literary and historic roots to contemporary environmental issues, look at successful protest movements, and explore Germany as a model for environmental initiatives and engaged citizenship around the globe.

In Translation

GERM 223F.00 Thinking Green in German 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59900

Kiley Kost

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent and concurrent registration in German 223

GERM 320.00 Life under Socialism: Culture and Society in East Germany 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57884

Juliane Schicker

What was life like under “actually existing socialism?” What films, books, music, and other media did people in the German Democratic Republic (or East Germany) consume and how did they cope with their country’s dictatorship? How can the experiences of people—particularly women—living in the GDR provide useful context for contemporary socio-political issues in the United States and beyond? We will discuss topics such as gender equality, education, health care, and queer life in the GDR. Taught in German.

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent

GRK 220.00 Euripides 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 244

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 57811

Kirk W Ormand

We will read Euripides’ Helen in Greek, in which the tragedian creates a plot around the non-standard version of events: Helen never went to Troy, she spent the entire war in Egypt; the Greeks and Trojans were fooled by a simulacrum. The resulting play is a tragicomedy or a romantitragedy that deliberately skews literary expectations. We will read a number of Euripides’ other extant tragedies in English, as well as critical studies that examine key issues in Euripidean criticism: the genre of tragedy, Euripides' depiction of women, and the role of rhetoric in late fifth-century Athens.

Prerequisite: Greek 204 or the equivalent

GWSS 398.00 Transnational Feminist Activism 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 59724

Meera Sehgal

This course focuses on transnational feminist activism in an era of globalization, militarism and religious fundamentalism. We will learn about the debates around different theories of social change, the challenges and pitfalls of global sisterhood and the various "pedagogies of crossing" borders. We will explore case studies of how feminists have collaborated, built networks, mobilized resources and coalitions for collective action, in addition to the obstacles and constraints they have encountered and surmounted in their search for gender and sexual justice.

HIST 139.00 Foundations of Modern Europe 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 5

Weitz Center 236 / Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59759

Susannah R Ottaway

A narrative and survey of the early modern period (fifteenth through eighteenth centuries). The course examines the Renaissance, Reformation, Contact with the Americas, the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. We compare the development of states and societies across Western Europe, with particularly close examination of the history of Spain.

HIST 153.00 Modern China: China with Mao 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57813

Seungjoo Yoon

This survey course of twentieth-century China examines how ordinary people interacted with Mao, the chief architect of Communist China. We will scrutinize social change over time by looking at patterns of contestations and negotiations between Mao and his rivals among peasants, workers, students, women, intellectuals, ethnic minorities, and local cadres. Topics include the operation of the new democracy, social classification and distribution, food and famine politics, the changing meaning of family and education, body and biomedicine, mass science and archaeological projects, and Mao’s exhibition culture. Students will engage with images, memoirs, autobiographies, interviews, oral histories, films, “garbage materials,” and archival sources.

HIST 176.00 Immigrants and Identity in Latin American History, 1845-present 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 5

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 59431

Jennifer L Schaefer

During the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, immigration to Latin America rapidly increased and immigrant communities responded to and reshaped national identities, cultural production, political movements, and social structures. This course analyzes multiple immigrant experiences, including Eastern European Jewish immigration to Argentina, Japanese immigration to Brazil, and Middle Eastern immigration to Mexico. This course focuses on the experiences produced by the voluntary immigration that increased after the end of the transatlantic slave system and forced migration. It considers how Afro-Latin American identities and the legacies of slavery intersected with narratives around citizenship, nationality, ethnicity, and race.

HIST 183.00 History of Early West Africa 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 5

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58972

Thabiti C Willis

This course surveys the history of West Africa during the pre-colonial period from 790 to 1590. It chronicles the rise and fall of the kingdoms of Ancient Ghana, Mali, and Songhai. We will examine the transition from decentralized to centralized societies, the relations between nomadic and settler groups, the institution of divine kingship, the emergence of new ruling dynasties, the consolidation of trade networks, and the development of the classical Islamic world. Students will learn how scholars have used archeological evidence, African oral traditions, and the writings of Muslim travelers to reconstruct this important era of West African history.

HIST 231.00 Mapping the World Before Mercator 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 8

Olin 141

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 59923

Victoria Morse

This course will explore early maps primarily in medieval and early modern Europe. After an introduction to the rhetoric of maps and world cartography, we will examine the functions and forms of medieval European and Islamic maps and then look closely at the continuities and transformations in map-making during the period of European exploration. The focus of the course will be on understanding each map within its own cultural context and how maps can be used to answer historical questions. We will work closely with the maps in Gould Library Special Collections to expand campus awareness of the collection.

HIST 240.00 Tsars and Serfs, Cossacks and Revolutionaries: The Empire that was Russia 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 7

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 58974

Adeeb Khalid

Nicholas II, the last Tsar-Emperor of Russia, ruled over an empire that stretched from the Baltic to the Pacific. Territorial expansion over three-and-a-half centuries had brought under Russian rule a vast empire of immense diversity. The empire's subjects spoke a myriad languages, belonged to numerous religious communities, and related to the state in a wide variety of ways. Its artists produced some of the greatest literature and music of the nineteenth century and it offered fertile ground for ideologies of both conservative imperialism and radical revolution. This course surveys the panorama of this empire from its inception in the sixteenth century to its demise in the flames of World War I. Among the key analytical questions addressed are the following: How did the Russian Empire manage its diversity? How does Russia compare with other colonial empires? What understandings of political order legitimized it and how were they challenged?

HIST 288.00 Reason, Authority, and Love in Medieval France 3 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 59959

William L North

In a series of letters written after the abrupt and violent ending of their sexual relationship, Peter Abelard, a controversial and creative teacher and philosopher, and Heloise, a respected abbess and thinker, explored central questions about the nature of gender roles, love, authority, and the place of reason in human affairs. In other works, Abelard articulated new approaches to ethical judgment (the primacy of intention), the status of universals, and the potential of logical argument to foster interreligious dialogue. Through their use of dialectic, his works modelled new approaches to metaphysics, ontology, anthropology, and the nature and use of authorities. Through close reading and discussion of these works and those of select contemporaries, this course will explore the key philosophical, social, and institutional dynamics of a moment of profound change in medieval thought and culture.

1st 5 weeks

HIST 289.00 Gender and Ethics in Late Medieval France 3 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 59958

William L North

Acknowledged by contemporaries as one of the leading intellects of her time, Christine de Pizan (ca. 1364-ca. 1431) was an author of unusual literary range, resilience, and perceptiveness. In addition to composing romances, poetry, quasi-autobiographical works, royal biography, and political theory, she became one of the most articulate critics of the patriarchy and misogyny of her world and a critical voice in defense of female capability. Using Christine's writings along with other contemporary documents as a foundation, we will explore perceptions of gender, the analysis and resistance to misogyny, the ethics love and personal relations, and the exercise of patriarchal power (and resistance to it) in domestic and public spheres in late medieval France.

2nd 5 weeks

HIST 383.00 Africa's Colonial Legacies 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58978

Thabiti C Willis

This course deepens understanding of the causes, manifestations, and implications of warfare in modern Africa by highlighting African perspectives on colonialism's legacies. Drawing from cases in South Africa, Uganda, Kenya, Algeria, and Sudan, the course questions whether Britain's policy of indirect rule, France's direct rule, and South Africa's apartheid rule were variants of despotism and how colonial rule shaped possibilities of resistance, reform, and repression. Students also will learn how different historical actors participated in and experienced war as well as produce an original research paper that thoughtfully uses primary and secondary resources. 

IDSC 152.00 Plague, War, Crisis: Reading Hobbes Reading Thucydides: Books 6-8 Catastrophe and Coup 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59456

Timothy Raylor, Clara S Hardy

We will meet once a week to read and discuss Books 6-8 of Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War in Thomas Hobbes’s famed translation of 1628. We will attend to the literary art and to the political and social contexts of the original Greek, as well as to Hobbes’s recontextualization of it to the England of the 1620s. This bifocal approach may provoke insights into our current predicament. 

LTAM 250.00 Indigeneity and Power in the Andes: Land, Labor, Knowledge 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59377

Walther Maradiegue

In this course, we will read, discuss, and engage with recent scholarship on colonialism, indigenous and communitarian feminism, and some of the issues and movements of indigenous peoples in the Andean region. We will examine the colonial and twentieth-century origins of the movements for indigenous rights in the Andes and seek an understanding of the varied meanings of indigeneity across time. We will emphasize the comparative study of Indigenous-State relations across the Andean countries, and highlight the role of indigenous women and other gender identities for the development of native agendas for autonomy and sovereign rights. Our primary materials will mainly focus on literature and visual arts authored by indigenous artists. Other readings will draw from scholarship in history, anthropology, and Indigenous Studies. This course will be taught in English.

LTAM 398.00 Latin American Forum 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59954

Yansi Y Perez

This colloquium will explore specific issues or works in Latin American Studies through discussion of a common reading, public presentation, project, and/or performance that constitute the annual Latin American Forum. Students will be required to attend two meetings during the term to discuss the common reading or other material and must attend, without exception. All events of the Forum which take place during fourth week of spring term (on Friday afternoon and Saturday morning). A short integrative essay or report will be required at the end of the term. Intended as capstone for the Latin American Studies minor.

MUSC 188.00 Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59337

Gao Hong

The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and a Chinese approach to musical training in order to learn and perform music from China. In addition to the Wednesday meeting time, there will be one sectional rehearsal each week.

Prerequisite: Previous experience in a music ensemble, Chinese Musical instruments or instructor permission

PHIL 273.00 Kant's Metaphysics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57818

Douglas B Marshall

In this course we aim to understand the metaphysics and the theory of cognition developed by Immanuel Kant in his monumental work, Critique of Pure Reason. Some of the main questions Kant addresses: How does the mind represent the world? Can we distinguish the way things appear to us from the way they are in themselves? What are space and time?  Does every event have a cause? Is it possible to have knowledge independent of experience? We will think about these questions and attempt to shed light on Kant’s systematic answers to them by means of careful reading and interpretation of Kant’s text.  

PHIL 274.00 Existentialism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Synonym: 59058

Anna Moltchanova

We will consider the emergence and development of major themes of existentialism in the works of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, as well as "classical" existentialists such as Heidegger, Sartre and De Beauvoir. We will discuss key issues put forward by the existentialist movement, such as "the question of being" and human historicity, freedom and responsibility and look at how different authors analyzed the nature and ambitions of the Self and diverse aspects of subjectivity.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 3

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58855

Dev Gupta

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 58856)

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 15

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58859

Summer N Forester

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 206.00 Tools of National Power: Statecraft and Economic Power 3 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 1

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm9:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57825

Ross L Wilson

In this section of three related five-week courses covering the Tools of National Power, we’ll assess the economic mechanisms governments use to advance their interests and influence others. Nations have always used economic policies in efforts to secure prosperity, address economic, political, and security priorities, and, where necessary, confront other states. We’ll look at the application of economic power and seek to assess the efficacy and effect of economic tools in international relations. Course readings, short papers, and significant classroom discussion will deliver content to students and set the stage for the final course, diplomacy, in the study of the Tools of National Power.

2nd 5 weeks

POSC 231.00 American Foreign Policy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59926

Greg G Marfleet

An introduction to the actors and processes of American foreign policymaking and to the substance of American foreign policy. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of how knowledge of the past, the global policy environment, the processes of foreign policymaking, and the specifics of a foreign policy issue come together to help determine modern American foreign policy. The course will review the structure of the international system of states, state power and interests, the historical context of American foreign policy, actors in American foreign affairs, models of foreign policy decision making, and the instruments of foreign policy.

Prerequisite: Political Science 122, AP American Government, or AP U.S. History is highly recommended

POSC 264.00 Politics of Contemporary China 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58872

Kent Freeze

This course examines the political, social and economic transformation of China over the past thirty years. Students will explore the transformation of the countryside from a primarily agricultural society into the factory of the world. Particular emphasis will be placed on economic development and how this has changed state-society relations at the grassroots. The class will explore these changes among farmers, the working class and the emerging middle class. Students will also explore how the Chinese Communist Party has survived and even thrived while many other Communist regimes have fallen and assess the relationship between economic development and democratization.

POSC 268.00 Global Environmental Politics and Policy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59928

Tun Myint

Global environmental politics and policy is the most prominent field that challenges traditional state-centric ways of thinking about international problems and solutions. This course examines local-global dynamics of environmental problems. The course will cover five arenas crucial to understanding the nature and origin of global environmental politics and policymaking mechanisms: (1) international environmental law; (2) world political orders; (3) human-environment interactions through politics and markets; (4) paradigms of sustainable development; and (5) dynamics of human values and rules.

POSC 323.00 Revolutionary Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59684

Eric S Mosinger

Cycles of revolutionary upheaval and counterrevolutionary violence punctuated Latin America’s tumultuous twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This course compares “successful” revolutions (Cuba [1959], Nicaragua [1979]) with “unsuccessful” (Bolivia [1952], Chile [1970]) and abortive (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Peru in the 1970s and 1980s) attempts at revolutionary change. We will examine questions including, why do revolutionary outbreaks occur? Why do revolutionaries take power in some countries and fail in others? How can we explain (counter-)revolutionary mobilization, violence, and terror? Do revolutions produce enduring social change, or reproduce enduring problems? What do Latin America’s revolutionary legacies mean for twenty-first century politics?

POSC 324.00 Rebels and Risk Takers: Women and War in the Middle East* 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 6

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm9:30pm7:00pm9:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58873

Summer N Forester

How are women (and gender more broadly) shaping and shaped by war and conflict in the Middle East? Far from the trope of the subjugated, veiled, and abused Middle Eastern woman, women in the Middle East are active social and political agents. In wars and conflicts in the Middle East region, women have, for example, been combatants, soldiers, activists, spies, homemakers, writers, and political leaders. This course surveys conflicts involving Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Israel, Jordan, and Iraq--along with Western powers like the U.S., UK, and Australia--through the wartime experiences of women.

POSC 333.00 Global Social Changes and Sustainability* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 58874

Tun Myint

This course is about the relationship between social changes and ecological changes to understand and to be able to advance analytical concepts, research methods, and theories of society-nature interactions. How do livelihoods of individuals and groups change over time and how do the changes affect ecological sustainability? What are the roles of human institutions in ecological sustainability? What are the roles of ecosystem dynamics in institutional sustainability? Students will learn fundamental theories and concepts that explain linkages between social change and environmental changes and gain methods and skills to measure social changes qualitatively and quantitatively.

Extra Time required.

POSC 366.00 Urban Political Economy* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 310

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59927

Richard A Keiser

City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? A research paper will be required. Students who have taken POSC 266 remain welcome to take POSC 366.

RELG 152.00 Religions in Japanese Culture 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 11

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59738

Asuka Sango

An introduction to the major religious traditions of Japan, from earliest times to the present. Combining thematic and historical approaches, this course will scrutinize both defining characteristics of, and interactions among, various religious traditions, including worship of the kami (local deities), Buddhism, shamanistic practices, Christianity, and new religious movements. We also will discuss issues crucial in the study of religion, such as the relation between religion and violence, gender, modernity, nationalism and war.

RELG 232.00 Queer Religions 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 8

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59508

Elizabeth F Dolfi

Passions, pleasures, ecstasies, and desires bear on religion and sexuality alike, but intersections and tensions between these two domains are complicated. This course wagers that bringing the hotly contested categories “queer” and “religion” together will illuminate the diverse range of bodies, activities, and identities that inhabit both. The course explores religion and sexuality in Modern Western thought, erotic elements in religious texts and art, and novels and narratives of religious belief and practice in queer lives. The course combines concrete cases with theoretical tools that queer and feminist scholars have used to analyze religious and sexual communities, bodies, and identities.

RELG 283.00 Mysticism and Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59896

Kristin C Bloomer

Love. Emptiness. Union. Ecstasy. These are some ways that humans have described “mystical experience,” often defined as an immediate encounter with God, ultimate reality, or the absolute—however those may be construed. This course interrogates “mysticism” across traditions, with close attention to issues of gender, sexuality, and race, through studying a number of famous female and male mystics across historical periods. Questions include: What, exactly, is mysticism? Is it gendered? Is it just the firing of a bunch of neurons? What is the role of the body in mystical practice? Are mystics critics of institutionalized religion? Radicals for social justice?

RUSS 280.00 1917 2 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am11:30am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59967

Laura Goering

Short texts in a variety of genres connected with the momentous events of 1917 provide the basis for continued development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 

Prerequisite: Instructor permission required. Waitlist only. Russian 205 or 293 required. Not open to students who have received credit for a 300-level Russian course.

RUSS 395.00 Senior Seminar: The Cult of Stalin 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59158

Anna M Dotlibova

Drawing on materials from film, literature, architecture, and mass culture, we will examine the cult of Iosif Stalin during "the Leader's" lifetime and continuing into subsequent eras through both repudiation and periodic revivals. We will address the pagan and Christian foundations of the Stalin cult, as well as its connections with the cult of Lenin. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Prerequisite: At least 6 credits at the level of Russian 330 or higher or instructor permission

SOAN 108.00 In & Out of Africa: How Transnational Black Lives Matter 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 1

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59868

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

In our contemporary world-on-the-move, people forge ties across countries and continents. This course introduces students to an Africanist transnational anthropology, emphasizing practices of care and connection among African migrants in both the U.S. and Europe. In families, migrant organizations, and workplaces, diasporic Africans circulate stories and strategies that respond to nationalist and often racist attitudes they encounter in their places of migration. Through readings by African/diaspora scholars and creative multi-method assignments, this course engages with the back-and-forth, profoundly transnational movement of connections, people, ideas, and institutions.

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 4

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59021

Ahmed S Ibrahim

An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 59022)

SOAN 333.00 Environmental Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 9

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59038

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Can we learn to use resources sustainably? Are there people in the world that know how to manage their environment appropriately? What are the causes behind environmental degradation? These questions are commonly asked in public and academic forums but what discussions often overlook is the fact that these are fundamentally social questions and thus social analysis is needed to understand them fully. This course aims at exploring key issues of human/nature interactions by using anthropological critiques and frameworks of analysis to show how culture is a critical variable to understanding these interactions in all their complexity.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 353.00 Ethnography of Latin America 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 2

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59035

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

This course explores the origins and development of contemporary lived experiences in Latin America as interpreted through ethnographic works in anthropology. We will examine and analyze the structural processes that have shaped contact among indigenous, European, and non-European immigrants (e.g. African and Asian peoples) in Latin America since the Conquest and through colonial periods to understand today's Latin American societies. We will pay special attention to the impacts of global capitalist expansion and state formation, sites of resilience and resistance, as well as the movement of Latin American peoples throughout the world today. Course themes will address gender, identity, social organization, indigeneity, immigration, social inequality and environment.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

Not open to students who have taken SOAN 250

SOAN 395.00 Ethnography of Reproduction 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59735

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

This seminar explores the meanings of reproductive beliefs and practices in comparative perspective. Using ethnographies, it explores the relation between human and social reproduction. It focuses on (but is not limited to) ethnographic examples from the United States/Canada and from sub-Saharan Africa (societies with relatively low fertility and high utilization of technology and societies with mostly high fertility and low utilization of technology). Topics examined include fertility and birth, fertility rites, new reproductive technologies, abortion, population control, infertility, child survival and child loss.

Prerequisite: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 and 226 or 262; or instructor permission

SPAN 205.01 Conversation and Composition 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 3

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59323

Jorge Brioso

A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 209.00 Radio and News in Spanish 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 10, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 1

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59325

Palmar M Alvarez-Blanco

Are you interested in talking about current news while practicing your oral skills in Spanish? Have you ever considered participating in a radio program? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with your Spanish while collaborating with “El Super Barrio Latino” a radio program conducted by the Latinx community of Northfield. In each program we will explore international and domestic news and we will interview people in our community. Relying on international newspapers, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. (Language of conversation is Spanish)

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 244.00 Spain Today: Recent Changes through Narrative and Film 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59326

Palmar M Alvarez-Blanco

Since the death of Franco in 1975, Spain has undergone huge political, socio-economic, and cultural transformations. Changes in the traditional roles of women, the legalization of gay marriage, the decline of the Catholic church, the increase of immigrants, Catalan and Basque nationalisms, and the integration of Spain in the European Union, have all challenged the definition of a national identity. Through contemporary narrative and film, this course will examine some of these changes and how they contribute to the creation of what we call Spain today.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 366.00 Jorge Luis Borges: Less a Man Than a Vast and Complex Literature 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59328

Jorge Brioso

Borges once said about Quevedo that he was less a man than a vast and complex literature. This phrase is probably the best definition for Borges as well. We will discuss the many writers encompassed by Borges: the vanguard writer, the poet, the detective short story writer, the fantastic story writer, the essayist. We will also study his many literary masks: H. Bustoc Domecq (the apocryphal writer he created with Bioy Casares) a pseudonym he used to write chronicles and detective stories. We will study his impact on contemporary writers and philosophers such as Foucault, Derrida, Roberto Bolaño, etc.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

Search for Courses

This data updates hourly. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the Search for Classes option in The Hub

Instructional Mode
Select one or more instructional modes that your residential situation will allow you to attend.
Class Period
Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests