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Instructional Modes

Course instruction will be delivered in one of four modes:

  • Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction — (only students physically on campus can enroll)
  • Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction — (only students physically on campus can enroll)
  • Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person — (can enroll students both on-campus and remote)
  • Online a web-based course that meets virtually — courses meet either synchronously, meaning the course meets primarily at specifically-scheduled times, or asynchronously, meaning the course may have occasional scheduled meeting times but is primarily offered without real-time, scheduled interaction — assignments are generally due with specific deadlines and exams may be conducted at specific times — (can enroll students both on-campus and remote)

AFST 130.00 Global Islam and Blackness 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57855

Ahmed S Ibrahim

This course will introduce students to key trends and moments in Islamic thought and activism in Africa and the black diaspora. It explores the historical construction of the categories of “race” and “religion” through a focus on Islam and blackness. We will analyze how blackness and Islam, and their relationship, has been conceptualized and presented by non-Africans, as well as the history of Islam in Africa and in the black diaspora. We will explore the construction of blackness within Islamic history and cultures, highlighting the notion of the Moor in medieval times and the Nation of Islam in U.S. history.

AMST 115.00 Introduction to American Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 4

Online Course

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59072

Nancy J Cho

This overview of the "interdisciplinary discipline" of American Studies will focus on the ways American Studies engages with and departs from other scholarly fields of inquiry. We will study the stories of those who have been marginalized in the social, political, cultural, and economic life of the United States due to their class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, citizenship, and level of ability. We will explore contemporary American Studies concerns like racial and class formation, the production of space and place, the consumption and circulation of culture, and transnational histories.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: AMST 115.WL0 (Synonym 59073)

AMST 254.00 The 1930s: Social and Cultural Impact of the Great Depression 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59764

Elizabeth McKinsey

Through cultural manifestations--literature, painting, movies, radio, historic preservation, and music--we will trace progress from shock and despair to hope in the ‘30s and see how Americans of all races and classes coped with the disruptions and opportunities of economic cataclysm, political shifts, new social programs and expectations, and technology. Materials will include texts on the New Deal, labor, the Great Migration and race relations; fiction, essays, and plays by Steinbeck, Nathaniel West, James Agee, Thornton Wilder, Meridel LeSueur, Hurston, and Wright; popular movies and music; and photography, painting, Art Deco, and the 1939 World’s Fair.

AMST 269.00 Woodstock Nation 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 11

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59835

Michael J Kowalewski

"If you remember the Sixties, you weren't there."  We will test the truth of that popular adage by exploring the American youth counterculture of the 1960s, particularly the turbulent period of the late sixties. Using examples from literature, music, and film, we will examine the hope and idealism, the violence, confusion, wacky creativity, and social mores of this seminal decade in American culture. Topics explored will include the Beat Generation, the Vietnam War, Civil Rights, LSD, and the rise of environmentalism, feminism, and Black Power. 

Extra Time Required

AMST 396.00 Producing Latinidad 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57831

Adriana Estill

As Arlene Dávila points out in Latinos Inc, Latinidad—the term that names a set of presumably common attributes that connects Latinxs in the U.S.—emerges in part from communities but, importantly, is developed heavily by the media, advertising, and other political and social institutions, including academia. In this course we consider how ideas and imaginings of who Latinxs are and what Latinidad is develop within political spaces (the electorate, the census), in local places, and through various media, including television, advertising, and music. We will consider how individual writers and artists contribute to the conversation. Throughout, we will engage with social and cultural theories about racial formation, gender, and sexuality.

Prerequisite: American Studies 115 or instructor consent

ARBC 144.00 Arabic Literature at War 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59942

Zaki A Haidar

Arabic literature is a vibrant and humane tradition. At the same time, several Arab societies have experienced periods of exceedingly violent conflict throughout the twentieth and into the twenty-first centuries. In this course, we will investigate the ways these two currents—war and the literary—converge in several Arab societies. As members of societies at war, but also as literary artists, how do authors represent these conflicting narratives? What sorts of war stories do they tell, how do they tell them, and what sort of literary practice is produced? We will study the birth of the Lebanese Civil War novel as a bona fide genre in the 1970s and 80s, how literature informed anti-colonial struggles in Palestine and Algeria from the 1950s to the present, and read some works of genre-bending horror and science fiction that have appeared in the wake of Iraq’s recent destruction. Taught in English, no knowledge of Arabic is required.

In translation

BIOL 374.00 Seminar: Grassland Ecology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58504

Daniel Hern√°ndez

Grassland ecosystems cover one third of the Earth's surface and occur on every continent except Antarctica. Grasslands provide habitat for millions of species, play a major role in global carbon and nutrient cycles, and are the primary source of agricultural land, making them an important ecosystem both ecologically and economically. This course will utilize scientific literature to explore the environmental and biological characteristics of the world's grasslands from population dynamics to ecosystem processes. Topics include competition and succession, plant-animal interactions, carbon and nutrient cycling, the role of disturbances such as fire and land use change, and grassland management and restoration. Waitlist only.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126, and one of Biology 210, 238, 248, 321 or 352 and instructor permission

Waitlist Only.

CAMS 110.00 Introduction to Cinema and Media Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 12

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58138

Carol Donelan

This course introduces students to the basic terms, concepts and methods used in cinema studies and helps build critical skills for analyzing films, technologies, industries, styles and genres, narrative strategies and ideologies. Students will develop skills in critical viewing and careful writing via assignments such as a short response essay, a plot segmentation, a shot breakdown, and various narrative and stylistic analysis papers. Classroom discussion focuses on applying critical concepts to a wide range of films. Requirements include two evening film screenings per week. Extra time.

Sophomore Priority. Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 110.WL0 (Synonym 58139)

CAMS 280.00 Advanced Screenwriting 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 2

Online Course

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59892

Tawnya M Bhattacharya

Topic: Advanced Writing for Television. This is an intensive writing practicum for motivated students to complete a well-structured original television pilot. The course will explore dramatic structure, character motivation and action, and the complex interplay between plot and character. Students will refine their tools for television writing as they develop and revise their pilot's logline, tone, stakes, theme, and more. Over ten weeks students will move from concept to outline and then to a full draft of their original pilot. Weekly feedback provides students with an honest evaluation of their material in a dynamic and supportive environment.

Prerequisite: Cinema and Media Studies 170, 264, 278 or 279, or instructor consent

CCST 180.00 Crossing Borders: Global Contexts of Migration and Immigration 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57958

David G Tompkins

This course will grapple with the issue of immigration and migration from both global and interdisciplinary perspectives. Through several different case studies (including such regions as the Americas, Africa, Europe, and more), taught by faculty from different departments, students will gain a deeper understanding of one of the burning issues of our time.

ECON 275.00 Law and Economics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 2

Hulings 310

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Synonym: 59136

Jenny Bourne

Legal rules and institutions influence people's behavior. By setting acceptable levels of pollution, structuring guidelines for contract negotiations, deciding who should pay for the costs of an accident, and determining punishment for crimes, courts and legislatures create incentives. How do economic considerations factor into legal rules, and how do laws affect economic output and distribution? In this class, we use court cases, experiments, and current legal controversies to explore such issues.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ENGL 109.00 The Craft of Academic Writing 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 5

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58930

Timothy Raylor

This course is designed to demystify the practice of academic writing and to introduce students to the skills they’ll need to write effectively in a variety of academic disciplines and contexts. Students will learn how to respond to other authors’ claims, frame clear arguments of their own, structure essays to develop a clear logical flow, integrate outside sources into their writing, and improve their writing through revision. All sections will include a variety of readings, multiple writing assignments, and substantial feedback from the course instructor.

ENGL 112.00 Introduction to the Novel 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59939

Jessica L Leiman

This course explores the history and form of the British novel, tracing its development from a strange, sensational experiment in the eighteenth century to a dominant literary genre today. Among the questions that we will consider: What is a novel? What makes it such a popular form of entertainment? How does the novel participate in ongoing conversations about family, sex, class, race, and nation? How did a genre once considered a source of moral corruption become a legitimate literary form? Authors include: Daniel Defoe, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Bram Stoker, Virginia Woolf, and Jackie Kay.

ENGL 115.00 The Art of Storytelling 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58919

Kofi Owusu

Jorge Luis Borges is quoted as saying that "unlike the novel, a short story may be, for all purposes, essential." This course focuses attention primarily on the short story as an enduring form. We will read short stories drawn from different literary traditions and from various parts of the world. Stories to be read include those by Aksenov, Atwood, Beckett, Borges, Camus, Cheever, Cisneros, Farah, Fuentes, Gordimer, Ishiguro, Kundera, Mahfouz, Marquez, Moravia, Nabokov, Narayan, Pritchett, Rushdie, Trevor, Welty, and Xue. 

ENGL 116.00 The Art of Drama 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 58931

Peter J Balaam

An exploration of drama approached as literature and in performance. New digital resources enable us to take world-class productions from the National Theatre and elsewhere as our texts. Drawing examples both globally and across time, we will consider plays and recent productions in their historical and cultural contexts. Students will develop critical vocabularies, debate interpretations, and hone their interpretive and rhetorical skills in writing reviews and essays. Additional time required for viewing performances.

Extra Time Required

ENGL 160.00 Creative Writing 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 2

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58920

Christopher M Martin

You will work in several genres and forms, among them: traditional and experimental poetry, prose fiction, and creative nonfiction. In your writing you will explore the relationship between the self, the imagination, the word, and the world. In this practitioner’s guide to the creative writing process, we will examine writings from past and current authors, and your writings will be critiqued in a workshop setting and revised throughout the term. 

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENGL 160.WL0 (Synonym 58921)

ENGL 160.02 Creative Writing 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 1

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 60019

Gregory G Hewett

You will work in several genres and forms, among them: traditional and experimental poetry, prose fiction, and creative nonfiction. In your writing you will explore the relationship between the self, the imagination, the word, and the world. In this practitioner’s guide to the creative writing process, we will examine writings from past and current authors, and your writings will be critiqued in a workshop setting and revised throughout the term. 

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENGL 160.WL2 (Synonym 60020)

ENGL 187.00 Murder 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 8

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58922

Pierre Hecker

From the ancient Greeks to the Bible to the modern serial killer novel, murder has always been a preeminent topic of intellectual and artistic investigation. Covering a range of genres, including fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film, this transhistorical survey will explore why homicide has been the subject of such fierce attention from so many great minds. Works may include: the Bible, Shakespeare, De Quincey, Poe, Thompson, Capote, Tey, McGinniss, Auster, French, Malcolm, Wilder, and Morris, as well as critical, legal, and other materials. Warning: not for the faint-hearted. (May not be retaken as ENGL 395.)

May not be retaken as ENGL 395 Murder

ENGL 221.00 "Moby-Dick" & Race: Whiteness and the Whale 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59880

Peter J Balaam

From its famous opening line to its apocalyptic close, Melville’s lofty and profane romance of the whaling-industry is gripped by the myths and marked by the traumas of race. Exploring its black-and-white thematics and racialized characters in nineteenth- as well as twenty-first-century social and political contexts, this course takes Melville’s stupendous book as an anatomy of "whiteness" as a racial construct in U.S. cultural history.

ENGL 222.00 The Art of Jane Austen 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59940

Constance Walker

All of Jane Austen's fiction will be read; the works she did not complete or choose to publish during her lifetime will be studied in an attempt to understand the art of her mature comic masterpieces, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion.

ENGL 234.00 Literature of the American South 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59765

Elizabeth McKinsey

Masterpieces of the "Southern Renaissance" of the early and mid-twentieth century, in the context of American regionalism and particularly the culture of the South, the legacy of slavery and race relations, social and gender roles, and the modernist movement in literature. Authors will include Allen Tate, Jean Toomer, William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Zora Neale Hurston, Eudora Welty, Katherine Anne Porter, William Percy, and others.

ENGL 245.00 Bollywood Nation 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 2

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58937

Arnab Chakladar

This course will serve as an introduction to Bollywood or popular Hindi cinema from India. We will trace the history of this cinema and analyze its formal components. We will watch and discuss some of the most celebrated and popular films of the last 60 years with particular emphasis on urban thrillers and social dramas.

ENGL 265.00 News Stories 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 3

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58939

Susan Jaret McKinstry

This journalism course explores the process of moving from event to news story. Students will study and write different forms of journalism (including news, reviews, features, interviews, investigative pieces, and images), critique one another’s writing, and revise their pieces for a final portfolio of professional work.

ENGL 266.00 Research Writing 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59754

George Cusack

This writing-rich course will address techniques for designing an extended research project and using that research to write in a variety of genres. Students will begin the term by designing an overall research topic in an area of their interests (not necessarily limited to literary studies or the humanities). Over the course of the term, students will research this topic independently while the class examines how different audiences and purposes determine the ways that writers use evidence, organize information, and convey their ideas. Writing assignments throughout the term will draw on students’ research and may include project proposals, literature reviews, blog posts, op-ed pieces, and posters.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENGL 266.WL0 (Synonym 59755)

ENGL 285.00 Textual Technologies from Parchment to Pixel 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58940

George G Shuffelton, Austin P Mason

As readers, we rarely consider the technologies, practices, and transactions that deliver us our texts. This course introduces students to the material study of writing, manuscripts, books, printing, and digital media. It attends to the processes of copying, revision, editing, and circulation; familiarizes students with the disciplines of descriptive bibliography, paleography, and textual criticism; and introduces the principles of editing, in both print and electronic media. It offers hands-on practice in most of these areas.

ENGL 295.00 Critical Methods 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58925

Susan Jaret McKinstry

Required of students majoring in English, this course explores practical and theoretical issues in literary analysis and contemporary criticism. Not open to first year students.

Prerequisite: One English Foundations course and one prior 6 credit English course

Not open to first year students.

ENGL 329.00 The City in American Literature 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 3

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 58941

Nancy J Cho

How do American authors "write the city"? The city as both material reality and metaphor has fueled the imagination of diverse novelists, poets, and playwrights, through tales of fallen women and con men, immigrant dreams, and visions of apocalypse. After studying the realistic tradition of urban fiction at the turn of the twentieth century, we will turn to modern and contemporary re-imaginings of the city, with a focus on Chicago, New York and Los Angeles. Selected films, photographs, and historical sources will supplement our investigations of how writers face the challenge of representing urban worlds.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one other 6 credit English course, or instructor permission

ENGL 350.00 The Postcolonial Novel: Forms and Contexts 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59941

Arnab Chakladar

Authors from the colonies and ex-colonies of England have complicated our understandings of the locations, forms and indeed the language of the contemporary English novel. This course will examine these questions and the theoretical and interpretive frames in which these writers have often been placed, and probe their place in the global marketplace (and awards stage). We will read a number of major novelists of the postcolonial era from Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and the diaspora as well as some of the central works of postcolonial literary criticism.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one additional 6 credit English course

ENGL 370.00 Advanced Fiction Workshop 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:50pm4:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58927

Gregory B Smith

An advanced course in the writing of fiction. Students will write three to four short stories or novel chapters which will be read and critiqued by the class. 

Prerequisite: English 160, 161, 263, 265, 270, 271, 273, Cinema and Media Studies 271, 278, 279, Cross Cultural Studies 270 or Theater 246

ENGL 371.00 Advanced Poetry Workshop 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
2:30pm5:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58928

Gregory G Hewett

For students with some experience in writing poetry, this workshop further develops craft and vision. Readings and exercises will be used to expand the poet's individual range, and to explore the power of poetic language. Over the ten weeks, each poet will write and revise a significant portfolio. 

Prerequisite: English 160, 161, 263, 265, 270, 271, 273, Cinema and Media Studies 271, 278, 279, Cross Cultural Studies 270 or Theater 246

ENGL 395.00 Seductive Fictions 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59894

Jessica L Leiman

Stories of virtue in distress and innocence ruined preoccupied English novelists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  This course will focus on the English seduction novel, considering the following questions: What was the allure of the seduction plot?  What does it reveal about sexual relations, gender, power, and class during this period?  How does the seduction plot address and provoke concerns about novel-reading itself during a time when the genre was considered both an instrument of education and an agent of moral corruption?  Authors include: Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Susanna Rowson, and Bram Stoker.

Prerequisite: English 295 and one 300 level English course

GWSS 398.00 Transnational Feminist Activism 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 59724

Meera Sehgal

This course focuses on transnational feminist activism in an era of globalization, militarism and religious fundamentalism. We will learn about the debates around different theories of social change, the challenges and pitfalls of global sisterhood and the various "pedagogies of crossing" borders. We will explore case studies of how feminists have collaborated, built networks, mobilized resources and coalitions for collective action, in addition to the obstacles and constraints they have encountered and surmounted in their search for gender and sexual justice.

HIST 153.00 Modern China: China with Mao 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57813

Seungjoo Yoon

This survey course of twentieth-century China examines how ordinary people interacted with Mao, the chief architect of Communist China. We will scrutinize social change over time by looking at patterns of contestations and negotiations between Mao and his rivals among peasants, workers, students, women, intellectuals, ethnic minorities, and local cadres. Topics include the operation of the new democracy, social classification and distribution, food and famine politics, the changing meaning of family and education, body and biomedicine, mass science and archaeological projects, and Mao’s exhibition culture. Students will engage with images, memoirs, autobiographies, interviews, oral histories, films, “garbage materials,” and archival sources.

HIST 176.00 Immigrants and Identity in Latin American History, 1845-present 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 5

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 59431

Jennifer L Schaefer

During the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, immigration to Latin America rapidly increased and immigrant communities responded to and reshaped national identities, cultural production, political movements, and social structures. This course analyzes multiple immigrant experiences, including Eastern European Jewish immigration to Argentina, Japanese immigration to Brazil, and Middle Eastern immigration to Mexico. This course focuses on the experiences produced by the voluntary immigration that increased after the end of the transatlantic slave system and forced migration. It considers how Afro-Latin American identities and the legacies of slavery intersected with narratives around citizenship, nationality, ethnicity, and race.

HIST 231.00 Mapping the World Before Mercator 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 8

Olin 141

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 59923

Victoria Morse

This course will explore early maps primarily in medieval and early modern Europe. After an introduction to the rhetoric of maps and world cartography, we will examine the functions and forms of medieval European and Islamic maps and then look closely at the continuities and transformations in map-making during the period of European exploration. The focus of the course will be on understanding each map within its own cultural context and how maps can be used to answer historical questions. We will work closely with the maps in Gould Library Special Collections to expand campus awareness of the collection.

HIST 287.00 From Alchemy to the Atom Bomb: The Scientific Revolution and the Making of the Modern World 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 1

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58976

Antony E Adler

This course examines the growth of modern science since the Renaissance with an emphasis on the Scientific Revolution, the development of scientific methodology, and the emergence of new scientific disciplines. How might a history of science focused on scientific networks operating within society, rather than on individual scientists, change our understanding of “genius,” “progress,” and “scientific impartiality?” We will consider a range of scientific developments, treating science both as a body of knowledge and as a set of practices, and will gauge the extent to which our knowledge of the natural world is tied to who, when, and where such knowledge has been produced and circulated.

HIST 301.00 Indigenous Histories at Carleton 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Other Tags:

Synonym: 57819

Meredith L McCoy

Carleton's new campus land acknowledgement affirms that this is Dakota land, but how did Carleton come to be here? What are the histories of Indigenous faculty, students, and staff at Carleton? In this course, students;will investigate Indigenous histories on our campus by conducting original research about how Carleton acquired its landbase, its historic relationships to Dakota and Anishinaabeg people, histories of on-campus activism, the shifting demographics of Native students on campus, and the histories of;Indigenous faculty and staff, among others. Students will situate these histories within the broader context of federal Indian policies and Indigenous resistance.

HIST 383.00 Africa's Colonial Legacies 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58978

Thabiti C Willis

This course deepens understanding of the causes, manifestations, and implications of warfare in modern Africa by highlighting African perspectives on colonialism's legacies. Drawing from cases in South Africa, Uganda, Kenya, Algeria, and Sudan, the course questions whether Britain's policy of indirect rule, France's direct rule, and South Africa's apartheid rule were variants of despotism and how colonial rule shaped possibilities of resistance, reform, and repression. Students also will learn how different historical actors participated in and experienced war as well as produce an original research paper that thoughtfully uses primary and secondary resources. 

MUSC 111.00 Music and Storytelling in the Western World 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57833

Brooke H McCorkle

Music is about relationships. Music is literally a series of relationships between organized sounds, but beyond that it is also about relationships between people. Through music, human beings tell stories about who they are, where they come from, what they value, and what dreams they hold for the future. In this course, the concept of storytelling via organized sound provides a framework for students to understand music in the “Western” world and its relationship to people and their values at given times and places. Instead of a chronological history, this course explores a series of topics where music and narrative intersect: mythology, dance, religion, politics, instrumental music, and audiovisual genres. Students will acquire the ability to write about sound and its meaning via blog posts, interpretive listening assignments, and a final creative project that incorporates personal experience with musical description. An ability to read music not required.

MUSC 115.00 Listening to the Movies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 5

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57748

Brooke H McCorkle

We all watch movies, whether it’s in a theater, on television, a computer, or a smart phone. But we rarely listen to movies. This class is an introduction to film music and sound and how it changed based on technological and stylistic developments from the silent era to the present day. Throughout the term, students will watch, speak, and write about a variety of films in order to develop literacy in theories of film music and sound. Class assignments including quizzes, cue charts, and short essays will culminate in a final project that may take the form of an analytical term paper or creative project designed by the student in consultation with the instructor. An ability to read music not required.

Extra Time Required

MUSC 130.00 The History of Jazz 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 8

Weitz Center M104

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Synonym: 59931

Andy A Flory

A survey of jazz from its beginnings to the present day focusing on the performer/composers and their music.

MUSC 232.00 Golden Age of R & B 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 2

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Synonym: 58090

Andy A Flory

A survey of rhythm and blues from 1945 to 1975, focusing on performers, composers and the music industry.

Not open to students who have taken MUSC 132

PHIL 122.00 Identity and Leadership 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 3

Online Course

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59055

Eddie E O'Byrn

Leaders who face tragedy and violence inspire others with their personal narratives of self-creation and meaning-making. This course invites students to investigate the relationship between the subjective meaning-making experience and various manifestations of the ‘problem of evil’. We will read a variety of texts that highlight narrative experiences of tragedy, self-transformation, and models of leadership as empowerment. The course approaches these topics from a variety of philosophical lenses including: Existentialism, Feminist Philosophy, Africana Philosophy, Queer Studies, Disability Studies, and Religious Studies. The texts of this course will include: Book of Job, Victor Frankl’s Man’s Search For Meaning, Lucy Delaney’s From the Darkness Cometh the Light, Susan Brison’s Aftermath: Violence and the Remaking of the Self, and Eli Clare’s Exile and Pride.

PHIL 273.00 Kant's Metaphysics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57818

Douglas B Marshall

In this course we aim to understand the metaphysics and the theory of cognition developed by Immanuel Kant in his monumental work, Critique of Pure Reason. Some of the main questions Kant addresses: How does the mind represent the world? Can we distinguish the way things appear to us from the way they are in themselves? What are space and time?  Does every event have a cause? Is it possible to have knowledge independent of experience? We will think about these questions and attempt to shed light on Kant’s systematic answers to them by means of careful reading and interpretation of Kant’s text.  

PHIL 274.00 Existentialism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Synonym: 59058

Anna Moltchanova

We will consider the emergence and development of major themes of existentialism in the works of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, as well as "classical" existentialists such as Heidegger, Sartre and De Beauvoir. We will discuss key issues put forward by the existentialist movement, such as "the question of being" and human historicity, freedom and responsibility and look at how different authors analyzed the nature and ambitions of the Self and diverse aspects of subjectivity.

PHIL 287.00 Conspiracy Theories and Dogmatism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 10

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Synonym: 57814

Jason A Decker

Conspiracy theories hit us where we are intellectually most vulnerable. Like global skeptical scenarios that occupy and perplex philosophers, they suggest a gap between appearance and reality; they suggest that we have formed our beliefs on the basis of massively misleading evidence. Often, they concern possibilities that we have never even considered, let alone properly assessed. The volume of evidence and arguments that conspiracy theorists offer for their theories can be vast and intricate. Yet it seems that, in some cases, we are perfectly within our epistemic rights in dogmatically ignoring or avoiding this volume of evidence and arguments. This won't do as a general policy, though, for history forces us to admit that sometimes conspiracy theorists are right. Theories like Bayesian formal epistemology that seem well-suited to guide us through these difficult waters often make our situation even more puzzling and problematic. To make fresh headway on these issues, this course will look critically at how philosophers, psychologists and political scientists have approached conspiracy theories and conspiracy theorists. We will consider topics such as cognitive dsyfunction and bias, epistemic trust, peer disagreement, the puzzle of misleading evidence, dogmatism, and formal theories of probabilistic reasoning. Along the way we will have occasion to consider many strange and fascinating conspiracy theories---a few of which have turned out to be true.

PHIL 320.01 Virtue Ethics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 7

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Other Tags:

Synonym: 60015

Allison E Murphy

What is a good human life? Who is a good person? Virtue ethicists think about these questions in terms of two central ideas. Virtues, such as justice or courage, make us a certain type of person (they give us a certain character). Wisdom (phronesis) enables good judgments about how to act in particular situations. How should we think about the relationship between virtues and wisdom? How does being wise differ from being (merely) intelligent or clever? These will be central questions for us to reflect on as we read several core texts from the contemporary tradition of virtue ethics. We will also spend some time on related concerns, such as what view of human nature, if any, is presupposed by virtue ethics, and how we should understand the relationship between being virtuous and being happy.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 3

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58855

Dev Gupta

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 58856)

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 2

Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 58857

Krissy K Lunz Trujillo

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 160.00 Political Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:00pm1:45pm3:00pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58858

Laurence D Cooper

Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions.

POSC 216.00 Politics in the Post-Truth Society 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 4

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59895

Krissy K Lunz Trujillo

We live in an age marked by attacks on democratic institutions, suspicion of expertise, and a general sense that facts are disposable in the face of inconvenient truths. This course will examine misinformation and anti-intellectualism in the past and today, how and why people adopt misinformation and conspiracy theories, the political effects of the post-truth era, and what mitigates the spread of misinformation. Through readings, discussions, and investigative projects, students will both advance their knowledge on the topic and learn to better evaluate information and evidence. This course focuses on the United States but occasionally includes a comparative and/or non-U.S. perspective.

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 6

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Synonym: 58860

Kent Freeze

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275) or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5)

POSC 268.00 Global Environmental Politics and Policy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59928

Tun Myint

Global environmental politics and policy is the most prominent field that challenges traditional state-centric ways of thinking about international problems and solutions. This course examines local-global dynamics of environmental problems. The course will cover five arenas crucial to understanding the nature and origin of global environmental politics and policymaking mechanisms: (1) international environmental law; (2) world political orders; (3) human-environment interactions through politics and markets; (4) paradigms of sustainable development; and (5) dynamics of human values and rules.

POSC 323.00 Revolutionary Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59684

Eric S Mosinger

Cycles of revolutionary upheaval and counterrevolutionary violence punctuated Latin America’s tumultuous twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This course compares “successful” revolutions (Cuba [1959], Nicaragua [1979]) with “unsuccessful” (Bolivia [1952], Chile [1970]) and abortive (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Peru in the 1970s and 1980s) attempts at revolutionary change. We will examine questions including, why do revolutionary outbreaks occur? Why do revolutionaries take power in some countries and fail in others? How can we explain (counter-)revolutionary mobilization, violence, and terror? Do revolutions produce enduring social change, or reproduce enduring problems? What do Latin America’s revolutionary legacies mean for twenty-first century politics?

POSC 333.00 Global Social Changes and Sustainability* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 58874

Tun Myint

This course is about the relationship between social changes and ecological changes to understand and to be able to advance analytical concepts, research methods, and theories of society-nature interactions. How do livelihoods of individuals and groups change over time and how do the changes affect ecological sustainability? What are the roles of human institutions in ecological sustainability? What are the roles of ecosystem dynamics in institutional sustainability? Students will learn fundamental theories and concepts that explain linkages between social change and environmental changes and gain methods and skills to measure social changes qualitatively and quantitatively.

Extra Time required.

POSC 352.00 Political Theory of Alexis de Tocqueville* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 58875

Laurence D Cooper

This course will be devoted to close study of Tocqueville's Democracy in America, which has plausibly been described as the best book ever written about democracy and the best book every written about America. Tocqueville uncovers the myriad ways in which equality, including especially the passion for equality, determines the character and the possibilities of modern humanity. Tocqueville thereby provides a political education that is also an education toward self-knowledge.

PSYC 370.00 Behavioral Neuroimmunology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 310

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58370

Gisel G Flores-Montoya

The immune system directly influences the central nervous system and behavior during both health and disease. The course will have an emphasis on animal behavior (e.g. memory and sociability assays) and techniques in neuroimmunology that range from genetic engineering (e.g. CRISPR and DREADD) to immune cell function, detection of surface receptors, and protein expression (e.g. flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, immune cell migration assays, ELISA, and western blot.) The topics that will be covered range from how cytokines influence behavior to effects of gut microbiota in brain function and behavior. This course will primarily use empirical research that will help you develop a deeper understanding of molecular techniques, cell biology, and develop strong analytical skills of biological findings in immunology and its connection with animal behavior. 

Prerequisite: Neuroscience 127 or Psychology 216 recommended or instructor permission

RELG 110.00 Understanding Religion 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 5

Leighton 305 / Leighton 304

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 58989

Kristin C Bloomer

How can we best understand the role of religion in the world today, and how should we interpret the meaning of religious traditions -- their texts and practices -- in history and culture? This class takes an exciting tour through selected themes and puzzles related to the fascinating and diverse expressions of religion throughout the world. From politics and pop culture, to religious philosophies and spiritual practices, to rituals, scriptures, gender, religious authority, and more, students will explore how these issues emerge in a variety of religions, places, and historical moments in the U.S. and across the globe.

RELG 152.00 Religions in Japanese Culture 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 11

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59738

Asuka Sango

An introduction to the major religious traditions of Japan, from earliest times to the present. Combining thematic and historical approaches, this course will scrutinize both defining characteristics of, and interactions among, various religious traditions, including worship of the kami (local deities), Buddhism, shamanistic practices, Christianity, and new religious movements. We also will discuss issues crucial in the study of religion, such as the relation between religion and violence, gender, modernity, nationalism and war.

RELG 232.00 Queer Religions 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 8

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59508

Elizabeth F Dolfi

Passions, pleasures, ecstasies, and desires bear on religion and sexuality alike, but intersections and tensions between these two domains are complicated. This course wagers that bringing the hotly contested categories “queer” and “religion” together will illuminate the diverse range of bodies, activities, and identities that inhabit both. The course explores religion and sexuality in Modern Western thought, erotic elements in religious texts and art, and novels and narratives of religious belief and practice in queer lives. The course combines concrete cases with theoretical tools that queer and feminist scholars have used to analyze religious and sexual communities, bodies, and identities.

RELG 246.00 Christianity and Capitalism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 8

Boliou 104 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59517

Elizabeth F Dolfi

The Bible says that “the love of money is the root of all evil,” but the history of Christianity and mammon contains multitudes – voluntary poverty and acquisitive empires, radical utopian communities and the blessings of business, peace movement feasts and prosperity gospels, colonialism and humanitarian neo-liberalism, and commodity fetishism for Christ. This course will use a breadth of historical case studies alongside critical theories of modernity and capitalism to explore Christianity’s relationship with wealth, from pre-modern economic theologies, to faith in modern industrial capitalism and Christianity’s vexed entanglements with late capitalist ideologies and practices.

RELG 274.00 Religion and Bioethics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 12

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59921

Caleb S Hendrickson

This class examines the ethical principles that often guide decision-making in health care. It focuses on principles espoused by many religious and humanistic traditions, within the context of a modern, pluralistic society. Using plentiful case studies, we consider a number of issues in bioethics, including assisted suicide; maternal-fetal relations; artificial reproduction, including human cloning; the use of human subjects in research; health care justice and reform; triage and allocation of sparse medical resources; and public health issues surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic.

RELG 283.00 Mysticism and Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59896

Kristin C Bloomer

Love. Emptiness. Union. Ecstasy. These are some ways that humans have described “mystical experience,” often defined as an immediate encounter with God, ultimate reality, or the absolute—however those may be construed. This course interrogates “mysticism” across traditions, with close attention to issues of gender, sexuality, and race, through studying a number of famous female and male mystics across historical periods. Questions include: What, exactly, is mysticism? Is it gendered? Is it just the firing of a bunch of neurons? What is the role of the body in mystical practice? Are mystics critics of institutionalized religion? Radicals for social justice?

RELG 289.00 Global Religions in Minnesota 6 credits

Michael D McNally

Somali Muslims in Rice County? Hindus in Maple Grove? Hmong shamans in St. Paul hospitals? Sun Dances in Pipestone? In light of globalization, the religious landscape of Minnesota, like America more broadly, has become more visibly diverse. Lake Wobegon stereotypes aside, Minnesota has always been characterized by some diversity but the realities of immigration, dispossession, dislocation, economics, and technology have made religious diversity more pressing in its implications for every arena of civic and cultural life. This course bridges theoretical knowledge with engaged field research focused on how Midwestern contexts shape global religious communities and how these communities challenge and transform Minnesota.

RELG 344.00 Lived Religion in America 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59922

Michael D McNally

The practices of popular, or local, or lived religion in American culture often blur the distinction between the sacred and profane and elude religious studies frameworks based on the narrative, theological, or institutional foundations of "official" religion. This course explores American religion primarily through the lens of the practices of lived religion with respect to ritual, the body, the life cycle, the market, leisure, and popular culture. Consideration of a wide range of topics, including ritual healing, Christmas, cremation, and Elvis, will nourish an ongoing discussion about how to make sense of lived religion.

SOAN 108.00 In & Out of Africa: How Transnational Black Lives Matter 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 1

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59868

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

In our contemporary world-on-the-move, people forge ties across countries and continents. This course introduces students to an Africanist transnational anthropology, emphasizing practices of care and connection among African migrants in both the U.S. and Europe. In families, migrant organizations, and workplaces, diasporic Africans circulate stories and strategies that respond to nationalist and often racist attitudes they encounter in their places of migration. Through readings by African/diaspora scholars and creative multi-method assignments, this course engages with the back-and-forth, profoundly transnational movement of connections, people, ideas, and institutions.

SOAN 206.00 Critical Perspectives on Work in the Twenty-first Century 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59568

Annette M Nierobisz

The American employment landscape continues to shift rapidly. In this course, we explore how social statuses such as gender, race, social class, age, and disability impact different types of workers who find themselves also challenged by work overload, new technologies, downsizing, and an unstable economy that mandates a reconsideration of retirement goals. Both ethnographic and statistical accounts inform our study of the academic field called, “Sociology of Work, Occupations, and Organizations.” While reviewing course material you will concurrently investigate a career of personal interest, learning what your “dream job” encompasses and how it functions in the contemporary world.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 240.00 Methods of Social Research 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 59025

Liz Y Raleigh

The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are considered. Student will demonstrate their knowledge by developing a research proposal that is implementable.

Prerequisite: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111; Sociology/Anthropology 239, Mathematics 215 or Statistics 120

SOAN 333.00 Environmental Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 9

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59038

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Can we learn to use resources sustainably? Are there people in the world that know how to manage their environment appropriately? What are the causes behind environmental degradation? These questions are commonly asked in public and academic forums but what discussions often overlook is the fact that these are fundamentally social questions and thus social analysis is needed to understand them fully. This course aims at exploring key issues of human/nature interactions by using anthropological critiques and frameworks of analysis to show how culture is a critical variable to understanding these interactions in all their complexity.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 395.00 Ethnography of Reproduction 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59735

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

This seminar explores the meanings of reproductive beliefs and practices in comparative perspective. Using ethnographies, it explores the relation between human and social reproduction. It focuses on (but is not limited to) ethnographic examples from the United States/Canada and from sub-Saharan Africa (societies with relatively low fertility and high utilization of technology and societies with mostly high fertility and low utilization of technology). Topics examined include fertility and birth, fertility rites, new reproductive technologies, abortion, population control, infertility, child survival and child loss.

Prerequisite: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 and 226 or 262; or instructor permission

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