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Instructional Modes

Course instruction will be delivered in one of four modes:

  • Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction — (only students physically on campus can enroll)
  • Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction — (only students physically on campus can enroll)
  • Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person — (can enroll students both on-campus and remote)
  • Online a web-based course that meets virtually — courses meet either synchronously, meaning the course meets primarily at specifically-scheduled times, or asynchronously, meaning the course may have occasional scheduled meeting times but is primarily offered without real-time, scheduled interaction — assignments are generally due with specific deadlines and exams may be conducted at specific times — (can enroll students both on-campus and remote)

AMST 269.00 Woodstock Nation 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 11

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59835

Michael J Kowalewski

"If you remember the Sixties, you weren't there."  We will test the truth of that popular adage by exploring the American youth counterculture of the 1960s, particularly the turbulent period of the late sixties. Using examples from literature, music, and film, we will examine the hope and idealism, the violence, confusion, wacky creativity, and social mores of this seminal decade in American culture. Topics explored will include the Beat Generation, the Vietnam War, Civil Rights, LSD, and the rise of environmentalism, feminism, and Black Power. 

Extra Time Required

ARBC 144.00 Arabic Literature at War 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59942

Zaki A Haidar

Arabic literature is a vibrant and humane tradition. At the same time, several Arab societies have experienced periods of exceedingly violent conflict throughout the twentieth and into the twenty-first centuries. In this course, we will investigate the ways these two currents—war and the literary—converge in several Arab societies. As members of societies at war, but also as literary artists, how do authors represent these conflicting narratives? What sorts of war stories do they tell, how do they tell them, and what sort of literary practice is produced? We will study the birth of the Lebanese Civil War novel as a bona fide genre in the 1970s and 80s, how literature informed anti-colonial struggles in Palestine and Algeria from the 1950s to the present, and read some works of genre-bending horror and science fiction that have appeared in the wake of Iraq’s recent destruction. Taught in English, no knowledge of Arabic is required.

In translation

ARBC 222.00 Music in the Middle East 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59204

Yaron Klein

The Middle East is home to a great number of musical styles, genres, and traditions. Regional, ideological, and cultural diversity, national identity, and cross-cultural encounters--all express themselves in music. We will explore some of the many musical traditions in the Arab world, from early twentieth century to the present. Class discussions based on readings in English and guided listening. No prior music knowledge required, but interested students with or without musical background can participate in an optional, hands-on Arab music performance workshop, on Western or a few (provided) Middle Eastern instruments throughout the term.

ARBC 371.00 Readings in Premodern Arabic Science 3 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59206

Yaron Klein

It is difficult to overstate Arab scientists' contribution to science. A translation movement from Greek, Persian and Sanskrit into Arabic initiated in the eighth century, led to centuries of innovative scientific investigation, during which Arab scientists reshaped science in a variety of disciplines: from mathematics to astronomy, physics, optics and medicine. Many of their works entered Latin and the European curriculum during the Renaissance. In this reading course we will explore some of the achievements and thought processes in premodern Arabic scientific literature by reading selections from several seminal works. We will examine these in the cultural contexts in which they emerged and to which they contributed, and reflect on modern Western perceptions of this intellectual project. Readings and class discussions will be in both Arabic and English.

Prerequisite: Arabic 206 or equivalent

ARTH 166.00 Chinese Art and Culture 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 5

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57979

Kathleen M Ryor

This course will survey art and architecture in China from its prehistoric beginnings to the end of the nineteenth century. It will examine various types of visual art forms within their social, political and cultural contexts. Major themes that will also be explored include: the role of ritual in the production and use of art, the relationship between the court and secular elite and art, and theories about creativity and expression.

ARTH 220.00 The Origins of Manga: Japanese Prints 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 11

Boliou 104

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59914

Kathleen M Ryor

Pictures of the floating world, or ukiyoe, were an integral part of popular culture in Japan and functioned as illustrations, advertisements, and souvenirs. This course will examine the development of both style and subject matter in Japanese prints within the socio-economic context of the seventeenth through twentieth centuries. Emphasis will be placed on the prominent position of women and the nature of gendered activity in these prints.

ARTH 236.00 Baroque Art 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 3

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 57980

Jessica F Keating

This course examines European artistic production in Italy, Spain, France, and the Netherlands from the end of the sixteenth century through the seventeenth century. The aim of the course is to interrogate how religious revolution and reformation, scientific discoveries, and political transformations brought about a proliferation of remarkably varied types of artistic production that permeated and altered the sacred, political, and private spheres. The class will examine in depth select works of painting, sculpture, prints, and drawings, by Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velázquez, Rubens, and Rembrandt, among many others.

ARTH 241.00 Contemporary Art for Artists 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
12:30pm3:00pm12:30pm3:00pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57981

Ross K Elfline

This course is a survey of major artistic movements after 1945 as well as an introduction to significant tendencies in current art and craft production. The goal of this course is to develop a familiarity with the important debates, discussions, and critical issues facing artists today. By the end of the course, students will be able to relate their own work as cultural producers to these significant contemporary artistic developments. Students will read, write about, and discuss primary sources, artist statements, and theoretical essays covering a wide range of media with the ultimate goal of articulating their own artistic project.

Prerequisite: Any two studio art courses or permission from the instructor. Not open to students who have previously taken Art History 240

Extra Time Required

CAMS 110.00 Introduction to Cinema and Media Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 12

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58138

Carol Donelan

This course introduces students to the basic terms, concepts and methods used in cinema studies and helps build critical skills for analyzing films, technologies, industries, styles and genres, narrative strategies and ideologies. Students will develop skills in critical viewing and careful writing via assignments such as a short response essay, a plot segmentation, a shot breakdown, and various narrative and stylistic analysis papers. Classroom discussion focuses on applying critical concepts to a wide range of films. Requirements include two evening film screenings per week. Extra time.

Sophomore Priority. Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 110.WL0 (Synonym 58139)

CAMS 212.00 Contemporary Spanish Cinema 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 2

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58142

Jay S Beck

This course serves as a historical and critical survey of Spanish cinema from the early 1970s to the present. Topics of study will include the redefinition of Spanish identity in the post-Franco era, the rewriting of national history through cinema, cinematic representations of gender and sexuality, emergent genres, regional cinemas and identities, stars and transnational film projects, and new Spanish auteurs from the 1980s to the present.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CAMS 340.00 Television Studies Seminar 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58144

Candace I Moore

This seminar aims to develop students into savvy critical theorists of television, knowledgeable about the field, and capable of challenging previous scholarship to invent new paradigms. The first half of the course surveys texts foundational to television studies while the second half focuses primarily on television theory and criticism produced over the last two decades. Television Studies covers a spectrum of approaches to thinking and writing critically about television, including: semiotics; ideological critique; cultural studies; genre and narrative theories; audience studies; production studies; and scholarship positioning post-network television within the contexts of media convergence and digital media. 

Prerequisite: Cinema and Media Studies 110 or instructor permission

CHIN 252.00 The Chinese Language: A Linguistic and Cultural Survey 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57965

Lin Deng

This course offers a unique introduction to the Chinese language for anyone curious about its defining characteristics and how they shaped, impacted, or relate to certain social, political, and cultural practices and traditions in China, present and past. This course will prepare students with the knowledge to make informed judgment on common misconceptions or prejudices, by non-Chinese and Chinese speakers, concerning the Chinese language or its writing system. Students are expected to learn about some general linguistic concepts and notions in regard to structural features of human language and its relationship with mind, society, and culture through this course. No prior knowledge of Chinese or linguistics is required.

In Translation

CHIN 364.00 Chinese Classic Tales and Modern Adaptation 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57837

Shaohua Guo

This course introduces to students influential Chinese classic tales and their modern adaptation across media platforms. Students improve their listening and speaking skills through viewing and discussing visual materials. Students develop their reading and writing proficiencies through analyzing authentic texts, formulating their own arguments, and writing critical essays. The overarching goal of this course is to increase students’ fluency in all aspects of Chinese language learning and to deepen students’ understanding of the role that cultural tradition plays in shaping China’s present.

Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or equivalent (students who have taken one 300-level course at Carleton are qualified to register)

CLAS 215.00 Ancient Greek and Roman Sexuality 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 57828

Kirk W Ormand

In this course we will question whether or not the ancient Greeks and Romans defined “sexuality” by object-choice, whether they understood sexuality as an integral component of one’s personal identity, and whether they had a concept of “sexuality” as we currently understand it. Emphasis will be on primary texts that demonstrate notions of sexual normativity and/or identity, such as Aristophanes’ Thesmophoriazousae, Plato’s Symposium, Aeschines’ Against Timarchos, and poetry of Sappho, Catullus, Ovid, Martial, and Juvenal. We will also read modern critical theorists (Foucault, Halperin, Richlin, Winkler), and will interrogate their arguments.

ENGL 112.00 Introduction to the Novel 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59939

Jessica L Leiman

This course explores the history and form of the British novel, tracing its development from a strange, sensational experiment in the eighteenth century to a dominant literary genre today. Among the questions that we will consider: What is a novel? What makes it such a popular form of entertainment? How does the novel participate in ongoing conversations about family, sex, class, race, and nation? How did a genre once considered a source of moral corruption become a legitimate literary form? Authors include: Daniel Defoe, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Bram Stoker, Virginia Woolf, and Jackie Kay.

ENGL 115.00 The Art of Storytelling 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58919

Kofi Owusu

Jorge Luis Borges is quoted as saying that "unlike the novel, a short story may be, for all purposes, essential." This course focuses attention primarily on the short story as an enduring form. We will read short stories drawn from different literary traditions and from various parts of the world. Stories to be read include those by Aksenov, Atwood, Beckett, Borges, Camus, Cheever, Cisneros, Farah, Fuentes, Gordimer, Ishiguro, Kundera, Mahfouz, Marquez, Moravia, Nabokov, Narayan, Pritchett, Rushdie, Trevor, Welty, and Xue. 

ENGL 116.00 The Art of Drama 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 58931

Peter J Balaam

An exploration of drama approached as literature and in performance. New digital resources enable us to take world-class productions from the National Theatre and elsewhere as our texts. Drawing examples both globally and across time, we will consider plays and recent productions in their historical and cultural contexts. Students will develop critical vocabularies, debate interpretations, and hone their interpretive and rhetorical skills in writing reviews and essays. Additional time required for viewing performances.

Extra Time Required

ENGL 187.00 Murder 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 8

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58922

Pierre Hecker

From the ancient Greeks to the Bible to the modern serial killer novel, murder has always been a preeminent topic of intellectual and artistic investigation. Covering a range of genres, including fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film, this transhistorical survey will explore why homicide has been the subject of such fierce attention from so many great minds. Works may include: the Bible, Shakespeare, De Quincey, Poe, Thompson, Capote, Tey, McGinniss, Auster, French, Malcolm, Wilder, and Morris, as well as critical, legal, and other materials. Warning: not for the faint-hearted. (May not be retaken as ENGL 395.)

May not be retaken as ENGL 395 Murder

ENGL 207.00 Princes. Poets. Power 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58932

Timothy Raylor

Can you serve power without sacrificing your principles or risking your life?  We examine the classic explorations of the problem--Machiavelli's Prince, Castiglione's Courtier, and More's Utopia--and investigate the place of poets and poetry at court of Henry VIII, tracing the birth of the English sonnet, and the role of poetry in the rise and fall of Anne Boleyn.

1st 5 weeks

ENGL 208.00 The Faerie Queene 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58933

Timothy Raylor

Spenser's romance epic: an Arthurian quest-cycle, celebrating the Virgin Queen, Elizabeth I, and England's imperial destiny.  Readers encounter knights, ladies, and lady-knights; enchanted groves and magic castles; dragons and sorcerers; and are put through a series of moral tests and hermeneutic challenges.

2nd 5 weeks

ENGL 221.00 "Moby-Dick" & Race: Whiteness and the Whale 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 59880

Peter J Balaam

From its famous opening line to its apocalyptic close, Melville’s lofty and profane romance of the whaling-industry is gripped by the myths and marked by the traumas of race. Exploring its black-and-white thematics and racialized characters in nineteenth- as well as twenty-first-century social and political contexts, this course takes Melville’s stupendous book as an anatomy of "whiteness" as a racial construct in U.S. cultural history.

ENGL 222.00 The Art of Jane Austen 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59940

Constance Walker

All of Jane Austen's fiction will be read; the works she did not complete or choose to publish during her lifetime will be studied in an attempt to understand the art of her mature comic masterpieces, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion.

ENGL 234.00 Literature of the American South 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59765

Elizabeth McKinsey

Masterpieces of the "Southern Renaissance" of the early and mid-twentieth century, in the context of American regionalism and particularly the culture of the South, the legacy of slavery and race relations, social and gender roles, and the modernist movement in literature. Authors will include Allen Tate, Jean Toomer, William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Zora Neale Hurston, Eudora Welty, Katherine Anne Porter, William Percy, and others.

ENGL 238.00 African Literature in English 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58936

Kofi Owusu

This is a course on texts drawn from English-speaking Africa since the 1950's. Authors to be read include Chinua Achebe, Ama Ata Aidoo, Ayi Kwei Armah, Buchi Emecheta, Bessie Head, Benjamin Kwakye, and Wole Soyinka.

ENGL 245.00 Bollywood Nation 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 2

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 58937

Arnab Chakladar

This course will serve as an introduction to Bollywood or popular Hindi cinema from India. We will trace the history of this cinema and analyze its formal components. We will watch and discuss some of the most celebrated and popular films of the last 60 years with particular emphasis on urban thrillers and social dramas.

ENGL 295.00 Critical Methods 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58925

Susan Jaret McKinstry

Required of students majoring in English, this course explores practical and theoretical issues in literary analysis and contemporary criticism. Not open to first year students.

Prerequisite: One English Foundations course and one prior 6 credit English course

Not open to first year students.

ENGL 329.00 The City in American Literature 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 3

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Hybrid combines both required face-to-face and online instruction

Synonym: 58941

Nancy J Cho

How do American authors "write the city"? The city as both material reality and metaphor has fueled the imagination of diverse novelists, poets, and playwrights, through tales of fallen women and con men, immigrant dreams, and visions of apocalypse. After studying the realistic tradition of urban fiction at the turn of the twentieth century, we will turn to modern and contemporary re-imaginings of the city, with a focus on Chicago, New York and Los Angeles. Selected films, photographs, and historical sources will supplement our investigations of how writers face the challenge of representing urban worlds.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one other 6 credit English course, or instructor permission

ENGL 350.00 The Postcolonial Novel: Forms and Contexts 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59941

Arnab Chakladar

Authors from the colonies and ex-colonies of England have complicated our understandings of the locations, forms and indeed the language of the contemporary English novel. This course will examine these questions and the theoretical and interpretive frames in which these writers have often been placed, and probe their place in the global marketplace (and awards stage). We will read a number of major novelists of the postcolonial era from Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and the diaspora as well as some of the central works of postcolonial literary criticism.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one additional 6 credit English course

ENGL 395.00 Seductive Fictions 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59894

Jessica L Leiman

Stories of virtue in distress and innocence ruined preoccupied English novelists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  This course will focus on the English seduction novel, considering the following questions: What was the allure of the seduction plot?  What does it reveal about sexual relations, gender, power, and class during this period?  How does the seduction plot address and provoke concerns about novel-reading itself during a time when the genre was considered both an instrument of education and an agent of moral corruption?  Authors include: Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Susanna Rowson, and Bram Stoker.

Prerequisite: English 295 and one 300 level English course

FREN 241.00 The Lyric and Other Seductions 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59282

Scott D Carpenter

French lyric poetry occupies a privileged position in the literary landscape of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. However, it also shares a common heritage with less literary siblings, such as popular music and even advertising. Starting with the study of such poets as Lamartine, Desbordes-Valmore, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Valéry, and Bonnefoy, we will also investigate poetic techniques in popular songs and contemporary ads. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 307.00 The French Art of Living Well 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59427

Cathy Yandell

Why is “la joie de vivre” inseparable from the idea French culture? Recognizing that there are as many definitions of what constitutes “la joie de vivre” as there are French speakers in the world, this course will explore and interrogate various approaches to defining--and living--the good life. Philosophers, writers, podcasts, videos, and songs will inform our analyses, from Montaigne to the present.

Prerequisite: One course beyond French 204

GERM 223.00 Thinking Green: Sustainability, Literature, and Culture in Germany 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 1

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57893

Kiley Kost

Germany is a recognized worldwide leader in environmental movements thanks to the nuclear power phase-out, the renewable energy transition, and the rise of the Green Party. Similarly, there is a long aesthetic tradition depicting nature and the nonhuman world in German-language literature and poetry. In this course, conducted in English, we will trace the development of contemporary Germany’s environmental practices through its literary and cultural legacy by reading and analyzing texts from established writers and thinkers. We will connect these literary and historic roots to contemporary environmental issues, look at successful protest movements, and explore Germany as a model for environmental initiatives and engaged citizenship around the globe.

In Translation

GERM 223F.00 Thinking Green in German 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59900

Kiley Kost

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent and concurrent registration in German 223

GRK 220.00 Euripides 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 244

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Instructional Mode:

Mixed Mode some students participate online and others participate in-person

Synonym: 57811

Kirk W Ormand

We will read Euripides’ Helen in Greek, in which the tragedian creates a plot around the non-standard version of events: Helen never went to Troy, she spent the entire war in Egypt; the Greeks and Trojans were fooled by a simulacrum. The resulting play is a tragicomedy or a romantitragedy that deliberately skews literary expectations. We will read a number of Euripides’ other extant tragedies in English, as well as critical studies that examine key issues in Euripidean criticism: the genre of tragedy, Euripides' depiction of women, and the role of rhetoric in late fifth-century Athens.

Prerequisite: Greek 204 or the equivalent

MUSC 111.00 Music and Storytelling in the Western World 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57833

Brooke H McCorkle

Music is about relationships. Music is literally a series of relationships between organized sounds, but beyond that it is also about relationships between people. Through music, human beings tell stories about who they are, where they come from, what they value, and what dreams they hold for the future. In this course, the concept of storytelling via organized sound provides a framework for students to understand music in the “Western” world and its relationship to people and their values at given times and places. Instead of a chronological history, this course explores a series of topics where music and narrative intersect: mythology, dance, religion, politics, instrumental music, and audiovisual genres. Students will acquire the ability to write about sound and its meaning via blog posts, interpretive listening assignments, and a final creative project that incorporates personal experience with musical description. An ability to read music not required.

MUSC 115.00 Listening to the Movies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 5

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 57748

Brooke H McCorkle

We all watch movies, whether it’s in a theater, on television, a computer, or a smart phone. But we rarely listen to movies. This class is an introduction to film music and sound and how it changed based on technological and stylistic developments from the silent era to the present day. Throughout the term, students will watch, speak, and write about a variety of films in order to develop literacy in theories of film music and sound. Class assignments including quizzes, cue charts, and short essays will culminate in a final project that may take the form of an analytical term paper or creative project designed by the student in consultation with the instructor. An ability to read music not required.

Extra Time Required

MUSC 130.00 The History of Jazz 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 8

Weitz Center M104

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Synonym: 59931

Andy A Flory

A survey of jazz from its beginnings to the present day focusing on the performer/composers and their music.

MUSC 232.00 Golden Age of R & B 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 2

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Face-to-Face in-person, classroom-based instruction

Synonym: 58090

Andy A Flory

A survey of rhythm and blues from 1945 to 1975, focusing on performers, composers and the music industry.

Not open to students who have taken MUSC 132

RUSS 395.00 Senior Seminar: The Cult of Stalin 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59158

Anna M Dotlibova

Drawing on materials from film, literature, architecture, and mass culture, we will examine the cult of Iosif Stalin during "the Leader's" lifetime and continuing into subsequent eras through both repudiation and periodic revivals. We will address the pagan and Christian foundations of the Stalin cult, as well as its connections with the cult of Lenin. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Prerequisite: At least 6 credits at the level of Russian 330 or higher or instructor permission

SPAN 205.01 Conversation and Composition 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 3

Online Course

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59323

Jorge Brioso

A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 244.00 Spain Today: Recent Changes through Narrative and Film 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59326

Palmar M Alvarez-Blanco

Since the death of Franco in 1975, Spain has undergone huge political, socio-economic, and cultural transformations. Changes in the traditional roles of women, the legalization of gay marriage, the decline of the Catholic church, the increase of immigrants, Catalan and Basque nationalisms, and the integration of Spain in the European Union, have all challenged the definition of a national identity. Through contemporary narrative and film, this course will examine some of these changes and how they contribute to the creation of what we call Spain today.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 366.00 Jorge Luis Borges: Less a Man Than a Vast and Complex Literature 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Online Course

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Instructional Mode:

Online a web-based course that meets virtually

Synonym: 59328

Jorge Brioso

Borges once said about Quevedo that he was less a man than a vast and complex literature. This phrase is probably the best definition for Borges as well. We will discuss the many writers encompassed by Borges: the vanguard writer, the poet, the detective short story writer, the fantastic story writer, the essayist. We will also study his many literary masks: H. Bustoc Domecq (the apocryphal writer he created with Bioy Casares) a pseudonym he used to write chronicles and detective stories. We will study his impact on contemporary writers and philosophers such as Foucault, Derrida, Roberto Bolaño, etc.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

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