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AFST 230.00 Black Diaspora, Politics of Place 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 57853

Ahmed S Ibrahim

Central to diasporic identity formation and imagination is the simultaneous belonging to a multiplicity of places. For black diasporic subjects, struggles against oppression and for new political futures inspire transgression against normative political boundaries. This class explores the role of place and politics in the making of the black diaspora in Europe and the Americas. It emphasizes the intellectual and political connections and the sense of shared identity and destiny. Through an interdisciplinary approach, this course will offer a global history of race, identity, and politics through the lens of the black diaspora.

ARBC 310.00 Advanced Media Arabic 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59200

Zaki A Haidar

Readings of excerpts from the Arabic press and listening to news editions, commentaries and other radio and TV programs from across the Arab world. Emphasis is on vocabulary expansion, text comprehension strategies, and further development of reading and listening comprehension. Class includes oral discussions and regular written assignments in Arabic.

Prerequisite: Arabic 206 or equivalent

ARTH 102.00 Introduction to Art History II 6 credits

Open: Size: 60, Registered: 50, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 57983

Ross K Elfline, Jessica F Keating

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from the fifteenth century through the present. The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, humanist and Reformation redefinitions of art in the Italian and Northern Renaissance, realism, modernity and tradition, the tension between self-expression and the art market, and the use of art for political purposes.

CAMS 214.00 Film History III 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58128

Jay S Beck

This course is designed to introduce students to recent film history, 1970-present, and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. The course charts the development of national cinemas since the 1970s while considering the effects of media consolidation and digital convergence. Moreover, the course examines how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form in the twenty-first century.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CAMS 246.00 Documentary Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 58143

Cecilia M Cornejo

This course explores the relevance and influence of documentary films by closely examining the aesthetic concerns and ethical implications inherent in these productions. We study these works both as artistic undertakings and as documents produced within a specific time, culture, and ideology. Central to our understanding of the form are issues of technology, methodology, and ethics, which are examined thematically as well as chronologically. The course offers an overview of the major historical movements in documentary film along more recent works; it combines screenings, readings, and discussions with the goal of preparing students to both understand and analyze documentary films.

Extra Time Required, weekly evening screenings T 7-9

CCST 208.00 International Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm
Synonym: 59062

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Have you just returned from Asia, Africa, Europe, or South America? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with the culture (and, when appropriate, the language) you left behind. Relying on magazines and newspapers around the world, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. You may choose to read the press in the local language, or read English-language media about your region, meeting once each week for conversational exchange. (Language of conversation is English.)

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CCST 275.00 I'm A Stranger Here Myself 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59063

Éva S Pósfay

What do enculturation, tourism, culture shock, "going native," haptics, cross-cultural adjustment, and third culture kids have in common? How do intercultural transitions shape identity? What is intercultural competence? This course explores theories about intercultural contact and tests their usefulness by applying them to the analysis of world literature, case studies, and the visual arts, and by employing students' intercultural experiences as evidence. From individualized, self-reflective exercises to community-oriented group endeavors, our activities will promote new intercultural paradigms in the classroom and the wider community. Course designed for off-campus returnees, students who have lived abroad, or who have experienced being outsiders.

CCST 398.00 The Cross-Cultural Panorama: A Capstone Workshop 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:15pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59064

Scott D Carpenter

The work of Cross-Cultural Studies traverses many disciplines, often engaging with experiences that are difficult to capture in traditional formats. In this course students will create an ePortfolio that reflects, deepens, and narrates the various forms of cross-cultural experience they have had at Carleton, drawing on coursework and off-campus study, as well as such extra-curricular activities as talks, service learning, internships and fellowships. Guided by readings and prompts, students will write a reflective essay articulating the coherence of the parts, describing both the process and the results of their pathway through the minor. Considered a capstone for CCST, but for anyone looking to thread together their experiences across culture. Course is taught as a workshop. 

CHIN 239.00 Digital China: Media, Culture, and Society 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 57835

Shaohua Guo

This course invites students to critically examine digital media technologies in relation to social change, cultural innovation, and popular entertainment. Drawing on literature from media, literary, and cultural studies, the course engages in topics such as new media institutions, Internet businesses, global activism, gender and sexuality, and mobile applications. Special attention is paid to the implications that digital media bring forth within particular social and historical contexts, as well as the ways in which the Internet serves as the site for the negotiation of various political, economic, and cultural forces. In translation.

In translation

CLAS 123.00 Greek Archaeology and Art 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 35, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59188

Alex R Knodell

This course explores the archaeology and art of the Ancient Greek world. Beginning with prehistory, we will track the development of the material culture of Ancient Greece through the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and conclude by discussing aspects of the Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman empires that followed. We will focus throughout on aspects of archaeological practice, material culture and text, art and society, long-term social change, and the role of the past in the present.

CLAS 240.00 Rome: From Village to Superpower 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58957

Jake N Morton

This class will investigate how Rome rose from a humble village of outcasts and refugees to become the preeminent power in the entire Mediterranean. We will trace Rome's political evolution from kings to the Republic, alongside their gradual takeover of the Italian peninsula. We will study how Rome then swiftly overpowered what had been the most powerful kingdoms in the Mediterranean and established themselves as dominant. Who were these Romans and what were their political, military, religious, and social systems that enabled them to accomplish so much? What critical events shaped their development and ultimately led to total political control of the Mediterranean world? Students who previously took Classics 228 cannot take Classics 240.

ECON 277.00 History and Theory of Financial Crises 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59386

Eduard Storm

The course provides an historical perspective on financial bubbles and crashes and critically examines theories of financial crises. The course will look at the long history of financial crises to highlight recurring themes and to try to determine, among other things, what went wrong, what elements precede most crises, and which responses were effective.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ENGL 214.00 Revenge Tragedy 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59673

Pierre Hecker

Madness, murder, conspiracy, poison, incest, rape, ghosts, and lots of blood: the fashion for revenge tragedy in Elizabethan and Jacobean England led to the creation of some of the most brilliant, violent, funny, and deeply strange plays in the history of the language. Authors may include Cary, Chapman, Ford, Marston, Middleton, Kyd, Tourneur, and Webster.

1st 5 weeks

ENGL 219.00 Global Shakespeare 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59675

Pierre Hecker

Shakespeare’s plays have been reimagined and repurposed all over the world, performed on seven continents, and translated into over 100 languages. The course explores how issues of globalization, nationalism, translation (both cultural and linguistic), and (de)colonization inform our understanding of these wonderfully varied adaptations and appropriations. We will examine the social, political, and aesthetic implications of a range of international stage, film, and literary versions as we consider how other cultures respond to the hegemonic original. No prior experience with Shakespeare is necessary.

2nd 5 weeks

ENGL 359.00 World Literature in the Twenty-First Century 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 58917

Kofi Owusu

Our focus will be on contemporary writers who tend to localize the global and/or globalize the local in their decidedly textured fiction and nonfiction published since 2001. Selected writers include Zinzi Clemmons, Ta-Nehisi Coates, J.M. Coetzee, Junot Diaz, Esi Edugyan, Nuruddin Farah, Yaa Gyasi, Dinaw Mengestu, Chigozie Obioma, and Zadie Smith.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one additional 6 credit English course or instructor permission

EUST 110.00 The Nation State in Europe 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58767

Paul Petzschmann

This course explores the role of the nation and nationalism within modern Europe and the ways in which ideas and myths about the nation have complemented and competed with conceptions of Europe as a geographic, cultural and political unity. We will explore the intellectual roots of nationalism in different countries as well as their artistic, literary and musical expressions. In addition to examining nationalism from a variety of disciplinary perspectives--sociology, anthropology, history, political science--we will explore some of the watershed, moments of European nationalism such as the French Revolution, the two world wars, and the Maastricht treaty.

FREN 206.00 Contemporary French and Francophone Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59270

Sandra E Rousseau

Through texts, images and films coming from different continents, this class will present Francophone cultures and discuss the connections and tensions that have emerged between France and other French speaking countries. Focused on oral and written expression this class aims to strengthen students’ linguistic skills while introducing them to the academic discipline of French and Francophone studies. The theme will be school and education in the Francophone world.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm
Synonym: 59271

Cherif Keïta

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 59272)

FREN 236.00 Francophone Cinema and the African Experience 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59274

Cherif Keïta

Born as a response to the colonial gaze (ethnographic films, in particular) and ideological discourse, African cinema has been a determined effort to capture and affirm an African personality and consciousness. Focusing on film production from Francophone Africa and its diaspora over the past few decades, this course will address themes such as slavery, colonialism, and national identity, as well as the immigrant experience in France and in Quebec. It will provide an introduction to African symbolisms, world-views, and narrative techniques.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 350.00 Middle East and French Connection 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59283

Sandra E Rousseau

PersepolisSyngue SabourLe rocher de Tanios—three prize-winning texts written in French by authors whose native tongue was not French but Arabic or Farsi. In this class we will direct our attention to the close—albeit problematic—relations between France and the Middle East (broadly considered) through an analysis of cultural and literary objects. What has this “French connection” meant for the Middle-Eastern and for French culture?

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

GERM 150.00 German Music and Culture from Mozart to Rammstein 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 57885

Juliane Schicker

In this course, we survey significant developments in German-language culture, broadly defined, from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century. Students of all disciplines and majors are invited to receive an overview of the music and culture of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, starting in the 1750s and tracing its impact into the present time. The course includes literature, film, music, language, history, habits, news, etc., and surveys major figures, movements, and their influence on the world’s civilization. The course encourages critical engagement with the material at hand and provides the opportunity to compare it with the students’ own cultural background. Taught in English.

In Translation

GERM 212.00 Contemporary Germany in Global Context 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 57888

Seth E Peabody

Over the past few years, Germany has been touted as the new leader of Europe, or even of the “free world,” and at the same time has seen a surge of bitter political division within its borders. The Berlin Wall fell thirty years ago, yet tensions between East and West remain stark. Chancellor Angela Merkel implemented an open-arms policy toward refugees, yet the extremist AfD party has orchestrated a troubling rise to power based on xenophobic sentiments. And while Germany has emerged as a global environmental leader, it has simultaneously faced passionate protest from its own youth regarding failure to meet the challenges of climate change. In this class, we examine the complexities behind these seeming contradictions in contemporary Germany by analyzing diverse texts ranging from political speeches to poetry slams. Taught in German; advanced grammar review supports analytical tasks.

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent

GWSS 200.00 Gender, Sexuality & the Pursuit of Knowledge 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 57920

Meera Sehgal

In this course we will examine whether there are feminist and/or queer ways of knowing, the criteria by which knowledge is classified as feminist and the various methods used by feminist and queer scholars to produce this knowledge. Some questions that will occupy us are: How do we know what we know? Who does research? Does it matter who the researcher is? How does the social location (race, class, gender, sexuality) of the researcher affect research? Who is the research for? What is the relationship between knowledge, power and social justice? While answering these questions, we will consider how different feminist and queer studies researchers have dealt with them.

HIST 131.00 Saints and Society in Late Antiquity 6 credits

William L North

In Late Antiquity (200-800 CE), certain men and women around the Mediterranean and beyond came to occupy a special place in the minds and lives of their contemporaries: they were known as holy men and women or saints. What led people to perceive someone as holy? What were the consequences of holiness for the persons themselves and the surrounding societies? When they intervene in their worlds, what are their sources of authority and power?  How did these holy figures relate to the established institutions--secular and religious--that surrounded them?  Working with a rich array of evidence, we will explore themes such as asceticism, embodied and verbal pedagogy, wealth and poverty, work, marginality, cultural difference, and protest/resistance. We will journey from the lands of Gaul, Italy, and Spain to North Africa and Egypt and the Holy Land, to Armenia and the Fertile Crescent.

Extra Time Required

HIST 154.00 Social Movements in Postwar Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 57834

Seungjoo Yoon

This course tackles an evolving meaning of democracy and sovereignty in postwar Japan shaped by the transformative power of its social movements. We will place the anti-nuclear movement and anti-base struggles of the 1950s, the protest movements against revision of the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty of the 1960s, and environmentalist movements against the U.S. Cold War projects in Asia to see how they intersect with the worldwide “New Left” movements of the 1960s. Topics include student activism, labor unionism, Marxist movements, and gangsterism (yakuza). Students will engage with political art, photographs, manga, films, reportage, memoirs, autobiographies, interview records, novels, and detective stories.

HIST 159.00 Disaster, Disease, & Rumors in East Asia 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59769

Seungjoo Yoon

How are rumors generated and transmitted in a period of high anxiety like disaster? Do rumors and anxiety reciprocate? How do rumors enhance existing stereotypes and prejudices of people? Why do rumors arise in a society that suffers from inadequate information or the complete cutoff in communication? This course classifies the types and nature of rumors at the time of making modern East Asia. Thematically, it examines the interplay between wartime science, environmental conditions, and societal capacities in modern Japan, Korea, and China. Topics include rumor panics generated by epidemic, water pollution, atomic bomb, famine politics, industrial toxins, and lab leaks. 

HIST 175.00 Gender and Sexuality in Latin American History 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59433

Jennifer L Schaefer

This course analyzes constructions of gender and sexuality in Latin America from the pre-colonial and colonial periods through nation building in the nineteenth century and globalization in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Drawing on sources including testimonies, legal documents, memoirs, and art, it considers how social, political, and economic structures created unequal power relations as well as how individuals moved within these frameworks, at times even challenging them. In particular, it explores how the racial and ethnic inequalities created through conquest, colonialism, and slavery both shaped and were shaped by gender and sexuality, as well as how these inequalities persisted.

HIST 250.00 Modern Germany 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58964

David G Tompkins

This course offers a comprehensive examination of German history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will look at the German-speaking peoples of Central Europe through the prism of politics, society, culture, and the economy. Through a range of readings, we will grapple with the many complex and contentious issues that have made German history such an interesting area of intellectual inquiry.

HIST 266.00 History of Islam in South Asia 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 310

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59659

Brendan P LaRocque

While Islam in popular thought is often associated solely with the Arab world, in reality eighty percent of the world’s Muslim population is not of Arab ethnicity.  The countries of South Asia--particularly India, Pakistan and Bangladesh--are collectively home to the largest number of Muslims. After examining the early background of the appearance and growth of Islamic societies and governments, we will explore the rich history of the expansion of Islam into the Indian subcontinent. We will take account of the role of trade and conquest in the early centuries of Islamic expansion and study the development of specifically Indian forms of Islam. The nature and impact of the Indo-Islamic empires will receive our attention, as will the interaction of Muslims with non-Muslim communities in medieval and early modern India. This will be followed by a look at the period of colonial rule, and an analysis of the specific historical contexts that gave rise to specific religious nationalist movements. We will then trace out how, once established, these movements developed according to their changing relationships to national liberation movements, secularism, state administrative systems, global economic shifts, and changing social demands. 

HIST 360.00 Muslims and Modernity 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

Prerequisite: At least one prior course in the history of the Middle East or Central Asia or Islam

IDSC 151.00 Plague, War, Crisis: Reading Hobbes Reading Thucydides: Books 3-5 Revolt and Revolution 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59455

Clara S Hardy, Timothy Raylor

We will meet once a week to read and discuss Books 3-5 of Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War in Thomas Hobbes’s famed translation of 1628 (subsequent books will be discussed in the course offered in the Spring term). We will attend to the literary art and to the political and social contexts of the original Greek, as well as to Hobbes’s recontextualization of it to the England of the 1620s. This bifocal approach may provoke insights into our current predicament. 

JAPN 247.00 Japanese Book Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59391

Kevin P Mulholland

What is a book?  The answer—from a nineteenth century Japanese perspective—may surprise you. This course looks at how the Japanese woodblock-printed book is the site of colliding worlds of creative, political, social, and technological challenges. The course materials will be both in translation and physical access to real historical examples. As a hands-on approach, the class will design and publish its own woodblock-printed book.  No Japanese language is required.

In translation

JAPN 356.00 The Japanese Response to COVID-19: Japanese Language Sources 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59410

Kevin P Mulholland

How have the Japanese responded to COVID-19?  By looking at newspaper articles, news videos, blogs, poems, manga, and other visual and verbal media sources, we will understand how the Japanese peoples are understanding and coping with the dramatic shifts in society caused by the pandemic. Students are encouraged to use their own localized experiences as a starting point for discussing and researching the Japanese responses. 

Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or equivalent

LATN 234.00 Julius Caesar: the Gallic and Civil Wars 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59389

Jake N Morton

Julius Caesar spent ten years campaigning in Gaul before being called back to Rome to face a splintered Republic and protracted Civil War. Caesar wrote fascinating accounts of both these wars, going beyond tactics to include ethnography, allegories of the Roman Republic in foreign societies, and analysis of why and how the civil war erupted and who was responsible. We will read significant portions of Caesar's Gallic War and Civil War, as well as writings about Caesar by contemporaneous authors. Caesar's elegant and clear prose belies a complex explanation and justification of the collapse of the Republic.

Prerequisite: Latin 204 or equivalent

LCST 245.00 The Critical Toolbox: Who's Afraid of Theory? 6 credits

Seth E Peabody

This class introduces students to the various theoretical frameworks and the many approaches scholars can use when analyzing a text (whether this text is a film, an image, a literary piece or a performance). What do words like ‘structuralism,’ ‘ecocriticism,’ 'cultural studies,' and ‘postcolonial studies’ refer to? Most importantly, how do they help us understand the world around us? This class will be organized around interdisciplinary theoretical readings and exercises in cultural analysis.

Prerequisite: At least one 200- or 300-level course in Literary/Artistic Analysis (in any language) or instructor permission

MUSC 188.00 Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 57691

Gao Hong

The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and a Chinese approach to musical training in order to learn and perform music from China. In addition to the Wednesday meeting time, there will be one sectional rehearsal each week.

Prerequisite: Previous experience in a music ensemble, Chinese Musical instruments or instructor permission

MUSC 192.00 West African Drum Ensemble 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 2, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 57694

Jay L Johnson

The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa.

Prerequisite: Music 199 and/or instructor permission

PHIL 113.00 The Individual and the Political Community 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59048

Allison E Murphy

Are human beings radically individual and atomic by nature, political animals, or something else? However we answer that question, what difference does it make for our understanding of the ways in which larger political communities come into existence and are maintained? In this course we will explore these and related questions while reading two of the most foundational works in political theory, Plato’s Republic and Hobbes’s Leviathan, as well as several contemporary pieces influenced by these thinkers.

PHIL 272.00 Early Modern Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59052

Douglas B Marshall

This course offers an introduction to major aspects of European theories of being and knowledge during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Key topics to be examined include:  the distinction between the mind and the body; the existence and nature of God; the relationship between cause and effect; the scope and nature of human knowledge. We will place a special emphasis on understanding the philosophical thought of René Descartes, Anne Conway, G. W. Leibniz, and David Hume. Two themes will recur throughout the course: first, the evolving relationships between philosophy and the sciences of the period; second, the philosophical contributions of women in the early modern era.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58830

Kent Freeze

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 58831)

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58834

Tun Myint

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 202.00 Tools of National Power: Statecraft and Diplomatic Power 3 credits

Thomas R Hanson

In this section of three related five-week courses, we will study the role of diplomacy as a component of U.S. statecraft.  An active and informed diplomacy can help achieve international cooperation in the face of shared global threats, while helping to forestall conflict and forwarding U.S. national interests. Yet in recent decades, diplomacy has often been overshadowed by military intervention and economic sanctions as a tool of power. We will discuss the history of diplomacy, including the specific traditions of U.S. diplomatic practice. Using case studies taken from current issues, we will assess how diplomacy functions in practice and reflect on the future role of diplomats in a world of dramatic change. Course modalities will include focused readings, active class discussion, and short papers.

1st five week

POSC 235.00 The Endless War on Terror 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 57836

Summer N Forester

In the aftermath of 9/11, the U.S. launched the Global War on Terror to purportedly find, stop,and defeat every terrorist group with a global reach. Without question, the Global War on Terror has radically shaped everything from U.S. foreign policies and domestic institutions to civil liberties and pop culture. In this course, we will examine the events of 9/11 and then critically assess the immediate and long-term ramifications of the endless Global War on Terror on different states and communities around the world. While we will certainly spend time interrogating U.S. policies from the Bush, Obama, and Trump administrations, we will also examine reactions to those policies across both the global north and the global south.

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58849

Greg G Marfleet

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 284.00 War and Peace in Northern Ireland 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58851

Dev Gupta

This class examines the decades-long conflict in Northern Ireland between Catholics and Protestants known as "The Troubles." We will investigate the causes of violence in this region and explore the different phases of the conflict, including initial mobilization of peaceful protestors, radicalization into violent resistance, and de-escalation. We will also consider the international dimensions of the conflict and how groups forged transnational ties with diaspora groups and separatist movements around the world. Finally, we will explore the consequences of this conflict on present-day Northern Ireland's politics and identify lessons from the peace process for other societies in conflict.

POSC 355.00 Identity, Culture and Rights* 6 credits

Barbara Allen

This course will look at the contemporary debate in multiculturalism in the context of a variety of liberal philosophical traditions, including contractarians, libertarians, and Utilitarians. These views of the relationship of individual to community will be compared to those of the communitarian and egalitarian traditions. Research papers may use a number of feminist theory frameworks and methods.

RELG 121.00 Introduction to Christianity 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59648

Caleb S Hendrickson

This course will trace the history of Christianity from its origins in the villages of Palestine, to its emergence as the official religion of the Roman Empire, and through its evolution and expansion as the world's largest religion. The course will focus on events, persons, and ideas that have had the greatest impact on the history of Christianity, and examine how this tradition has evolved in different ways in response to different needs, cultures, and tensions--political and otherwise--around the world. This is an introductory course. No familiarity with the Bible, Christianity, or the academic study of religion is presupposed.

RUSS 293.00 Advanced Russian Skill Development 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59750

Anna M Dotlibova

In this course students use authentic materials to learn about selected aspects of Russian culture in global context, while continuing to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. For students who have completed the language requirement in Russian.  

 

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or instructor consent

RUSS 301.00 Current Events in the Russophone Media 3 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59721

Diane M Nemec Ignashev

In weekly meetings we will discuss in Russian current events taking place in Russia and around the world as reported by the Russophone online media. Emphasis will be on reading, listening, and conversation. Vocabulary building by topics; grammar as needed.

Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent registration in Russian 205 or instructor consent

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59030

Ahmed S Ibrahim

An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 59031)

SOAN 208.00 Gentrification 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59596

Colin McLaughlin-Alcock

Gentrification, a process of neighborhood-level class displacement, whereby devalued urban areas are redeveloped into trendy hubs, is one of the predominant modes of urban change in the twenty-first century. In this class, we will first develop a general understanding of how gentrification works. Then we will direct ethnographic attention to explore how gentrification takes place in specific contexts around the globe. We will examine how social boundaries, power relationships, and identities are reorganized through gentrification; how class and racial disparity are produced and enforced; how the social meaning of place impacts neighborhood change; and how communities have resisted gentrification.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 226.00 Anthropology of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59034

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

We all lead gendered lives, in our felt identities as well as through how we are perceived, advantaged, and disadvantaged by others. This course examines gender and gender relations from an anthropological perspective, centering and contextualizing the global human diversity of gendered experiences. Key concepts such as gender, voice/mutedness, status, public and private spheres, and the gendered division of labor—and their intellectual history—let us explore intriguing questions such as how many genders there are, and whether gender is mutable. The course focuses on two areas: 1) the role of sex, sexuality, and procreation in creating cultural notions of gender, and 2) the impacts of colonialism, globalization, and economic underdevelopment on gender relations.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above.

SOAN 228.00 Public Sociology of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59017

Wes D Markofski

From the discipline’s earliest days, sociologists have considered religion a fascinating and perplexing object of study. Classical sociologists devoted enormous attention to the topic of religion, famously linking it to the development of capitalism and Western modernity (Weber), to social solidarity and symbolic classification systems (Durkheim), to political passivity and social conservatism (Marx), and to the varying forms of social, economic, and political life found in the world’s great civilizations. This course focuses on special topics in the contemporary sociology of religion, with a particular emphasis on religion in public and political life in American and global civil society.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses number 200 or above

SOAN 233.00 Anthropology of Food 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59018

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Food is the way to a person's heart but perhaps even more interesting, the window into a society's soul. Simply speaking understating a society's foodways is the best way to comprehend the complexity between people, culture and nature. This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior, from food procurement and consumption practices to the politics of nutrition and diets. In doing so we hope to elucidate how food is more than mere sustenance and that often the act of eating is a manifestation of power, resistance, identity, and community. Class fees apply.

Sophomore Priority, Class Fees Apply

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 233.WL0 (Synonym 59695)

SOAN 331.00 Anthropological Thought and Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59010

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

A systematic introduction to the theoretical foundations of social and cultural anthropology with special emphasis given to twentieth century British, French and American schools. The course deals with such seminal figures as Morgan, Boas, Malinowski, Radcliffe-Brown, Levi-Straus, Harris, Sahlins, Bourdieu, Geertz, and Appadurai. The reading strikes a balance between ethnographic accounts and theoretical statements.

Prerequisite: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 or instructor permission

SPAN 205.01 Conversation and Composition 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59310

Humberto R Huergo

A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 209.00 Radio and News in Spanish 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 10, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am
Synonym: 59311

Palmar M Alvarez-Blanco

Are you interested in talking about current news while practicing your oral skills in Spanish? Have you ever considered participating in a radio program? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with your Spanish while collaborating with “El Super Barrio Latino” a radio program conducted by the Latinx community of Northfield. In each program we will explore international and domestic news and we will interview people in our community. Relying on international newspapers, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. (Language of conversation is Spanish)

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 242.00 Introduction to Latin American Literature 6 credits

Silvia Lopez

An introductory course to reading major texts in Spanish provides an historical survey of the literary movements within Latin American literature from the pre-Hispanic to the contemporary period. Recommended as a foundation course for further study. Not open to seniors.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency

Not open to seniors

SPAN 262.00 Myth and History in Central American Literature 6 credits

Yansi Y Perez

In this course we study the relationship between myth and history in Central America since its origins in the Popol Vuh, the sacred texts of the Mayans until the period of the post-civil wars era. The course is organized in a chronological manner. We will study, in addition to the Popol Vuh, the chronicles of Alvarado, some poems by Rubén Darío and Francisco Gavidia, some of the writings of Miguel Ãngel Asturias and Salarrué. The course will end with a study of critical visions of the mythical presented by more contemporary authors such as Roque Dalton and Luis de Lión. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 370.00 Indigeneity and Gender in Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58077

Walther Maradiegue

This course will examine representations of Indigenous peoples in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with special attention to constructions of race and gender. We will explore topics such as the racial and gendered associations used to construct indigeneity, the exclusion of alternative indigenous gender subjectivities, and the double subordination indigenous women have historically experienced. Some questions we will explore are: How has indigeneity been understood in nineteenth and twentieth-century Latin America? How have nineteenth-century Latin American nations imagined and disciplined female indigeneity? What new forms of indigenous gender identities became visible during the twentieth century? The course includes materials related to Central America (Mexico, Guatemala), the Andes, and the Amazon.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

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