ENROLL Course Search

Saved Courses (0)

Your search for courses for 21/WI and with Overlay: QRE found 99 courses.

Revise Your Search New Search

ASTR 110.00 Introduction to Astronomy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 48, Registered: 48, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58207

Valerie K Fox

An introduction to current astronomy with an emphasis on how we know what we know. Topics include the solar system; the life cycles of stars; pulsars, quasars, and black holes; and the history and future fate of the universe. No mathematics background beyond high school algebra and trigonometry is assumed.

BIOL 101.00 Human Reproduction and Sexuality 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 310

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58427

Matt S Rand

The myths surrounding human reproduction and sexuality may out weigh our collective knowledge and understanding. This course will review the basic biology of all aspects of reproduction--from genes to behavior--in an attempt to better understand one of the more basic and important processes in nature. Topics will vary widely and will be generated in part by student interest. A sample of topics might include: hormones, PMS, fertilization, pregnancy, arousal, attraction, the evolution of the orgasm, and the biology of sexuality.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 101.WL0 (Synonym 59615)

BIOL 125.52 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am2:00pm6:00pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58428

Stephan G Zweifel, Mark McKone, Annie L Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL2 (Synonym 58433)

BIOL 125.53 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
2:30pm6:30pm
Synonym: 58429

Stephan G Zweifel, Mark McKone, Sarah Deel

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL3 (Synonym 58434)

BIOL 125.54 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am2:00pm6:00pm9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58430

Stephan G Zweifel, Mark McKone, Annie L Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL4 (Synonym 58435)

BIOL 125.57 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am8:00am12:00pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58431

Stephan G Zweifel, Mark McKone, Sarah Deel

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL7 (Synonym 58436)

BIOL 126.52 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am1:45pm5:45pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58438

Mike T Nishizaki, Rika E Anderson, David Hougen-Eitzman

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL2 (Synonym 58441)

BIOL 126.54 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am1:45pm5:45pm9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58440

Rika E Anderson, Mike T Nishizaki, David Hougen-Eitzman

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL4 (Synonym 58443)

BIOL 126.59 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am8:00am12:00pm9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58439

Rika E Anderson, Mike T Nishizaki

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL9 (Synonym 58442)

BIOL 210.00 Global Change Biology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 48, Registered: 49, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58444

John L Berini

Environmental problems are caused by a complex mix of physical, biological, social, economic, political, and technological factors. This course explores how these environmental problems affect life on Earth by examining the biological processes underlying natural ecological systems and the effects of global environmental changes such as resources consumption and overharvesting, land-use change, climate warming, pollution, extinction and biodiversity loss, and invasive species.

Prerequisite: One introductory science lab course (Biology 125, 126, Chemistry 123, 128, Geology 110, 115 or 120)

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 210.WL0 (Synonym 58445)

BIOL 234.00 Microbiology with Laboratory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 58446

Raka M Mitra

A study of the metabolism, genetics, structure, and function of microorganisms. While presented in the framework of the concepts of cellular and molecular biology, the emphasis will be on the uniqueness and diversity of the microbial world. The course integrates lecture and laboratory, and will fulfill requirements of a microbiology course with lab for veterinary or pharmacy schools.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126; Concurrent registration in Biology 235

Requires concurrent registration in BIOL 235

BIOL 240.00 Genetics 6 credits

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58449

Emily K Ho

A study of the transmission of genetic information between generations of organisms, and of the mechanism of expression of information within an individual organism. The main emphasis will be on the physical and chemical basis of heredity; mutational, transmissional and functional analysis of the genetic material, and gene expression.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 or instructor permission

BIOL 244.00 Biostatistics 3 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 58484

Mark McKone

An introduction to statistical techniques commonly used in Biology. The course will use examples from primary literature to examine the different ways that biological data are organized and analyzed. Emphasis will be placed on how to choose the appropriate statistical techniques in different circumstances and how to use statistical software to carry out tests. Topics covered include variable types (categorical, parametric, and non-parametric), analysis of variance, generalized linear models, and meta-analysis. There will be an opportunity for students to analyze data from their own research experiences.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and one Biology 200 or 300 level course

BIOL 310.00 Immunology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58485

Debby R Walser-Kuntz

This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity. Topics to be covered include the structure and function of antibodies, cytokines, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in antigen presentation, cellular immunity, immunodeficiencies, and current techniques used to study immune responses.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and either Biology 240 or 280

BIOL 332.00 Human Physiology 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 42, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58486

Fernan F Jaramillo

Human Physiology seeks to understand the fundamental mechanisms responsible for the diverse functions of the body. Course topics include the function and regulation of the various physiological systems (nervous, circulatory, endocrine, excretory, respiratory, digestive, etc.), biochemistry, cellular physiology, homeostasis and acid-base chemistry. The study of human physiology provides the principal groundwork for internal medicine, pharmacology, and other related health fields. The laboratory includes a variety of experiments focusing on the function and regulation of the human body.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126; Concurrent registration in Biology 333

BIOL 333 required. Students should waitlist for BOTH 333 (lab) and 332 (lecture) to be considered for enrollment from either waitlist.

BIOL 368.00 Seminar: Developmental Neurobiology 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58489

Eric D Hoopfer

An examination of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying development of the nervous system. We will survey recent studies of a variety of model organisms to explore key steps in neuronal development including neural induction, patterning, specification of neuronal identity, axonal guidance, synapse formation, cell death and regeneration.

Prerequisite: Biology 240 or Biology 280

CGSC 233.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58303

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with PSYC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Cognitive Science 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or permission of the instructor

CGSC 232 required. Cross listed with PSYC 233.

CGSC 233.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58304

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with PSYC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Cognitive Science 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or permission of the instructor

CGSC 232 required. Cross listed with PSYC 233.

CHEM 123.53 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 59687

Julia G Bakker-Arkema

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 123.54 Principles of Chemistry I With Problem Solving and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am9:50am10:50am
1:45pm5:45pm
Synonym: 58159

Daniela L Kohen

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128. This section of Chemistry with problem solving is periodically offered for students who wish to further develop their general analytical and critical thinking skills. This smaller section will have additional class meetings for problem solving and review. Chemistry 123 with problem solving is appropriate for students who would like to have more scheduled time to work with a faculty member on developing their scientific reasoning skills and understanding of the foundations of chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 123.59 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am8:00am12:00pm9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58195

Julia G Bakker-Arkema

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 224.52 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am1:45pm5:45pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58196

Joe Chihade

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 224.57 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58197

Joe Chihade

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 233.53 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
2:30pm6:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59741

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.54 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 21, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm5:45pm1:50pm2:50pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58160

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.59 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 21, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm8:00am12:00pm1:50pm2:50pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58161

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 234.52 Organic Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 21, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm1:45pm5:45pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58162

Chris T Calderone

The chemistry of functional groups is continued from Chemistry 233, and is extended to the multifunctional compounds found in nature, in particular carbohydrates and proteins. The laboratory focuses upon inquiry-based projects and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233

CHEM 234.57 Organic Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm8:00am12:00pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58163

Chris T Calderone

The chemistry of functional groups is continued from Chemistry 233, and is extended to the multifunctional compounds found in nature, in particular carbohydrates and proteins. The laboratory focuses upon inquiry-based projects and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233

CHEM 289.00 Climate & Health: From Science to Practice in Ethiopia 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 56103

Deborah S Gross, Tsegaye H Nega

This course is the second part of a two-term course sequence beginning with ENTS 289. This course will start with a multi-week trip to Ethiopia. While there, we will carry out a research program to assess the impact of cooking technologies on air quality in peoples’ homes, investigate the connections between regional and national environmental impacts and individual choices, and meet with national and international organizations working on these issues. We will work in both urban Addis Ababa and a rural area, Wolkite, to explore both types of settings. Back on campus during winter term, we will reflect on our experiences, analyze data, prepare and make public presentations, and propose appropriate follow-up projects.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in ENTS 289 the term before

Ethiopia Winter Break Program

CHEM 302.01 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58164

Will Hollingsworth, Trish A Ferrett

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 302.02 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58165

Will Hollingsworth, Trish A Ferrett

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 302.03 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58166

Trish A Ferrett, Will Hollingsworth

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 302.04 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58167

Trish A Ferrett, Will Hollingsworth

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 330.00 Instrumental Chemical Analysis 6 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58168

Steven M Drew

This course covers the basic principles of quantitative instrumental chemical analysis. Course topics include chromatography, electroanalytical chemistry, analytical spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The background needed to understand the theory and application of these instrumental techniques will be covered. In addition, students will have the opportunity to explore current research in the field of analytical chemistry through the reading and presentation of articles from the primary literature.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 (230) and Chemistry 233; Concurrent registration in Chemistry 331

Requires concurrent registration in Chemistry 331

CHEM 331.01 Instrumental Chemical Analysis Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 4, Registered: 3, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
8:00am12:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58200

Steven M Drew

This laboratory provides students with experience in using instrumental methods for quantitative chemical analysis. Laboratory work consists of several assigned experiments that use instrumental techniques such as liquid and gas chromatography, UV spectrophotometry and fluorometry, mass spectrometry, and voltammetry. This laboratory concludes with an instrumental analysis project that is researched and designed by student groups.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Chemistry 330; Chemistry 224 (230) and 233

CHEM 330 required.

CHEM 331.02 Instrumental Chemical Analysis Laboratory 2 credits

Closed: Size: 4, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58169

Steven M Drew

This laboratory provides students with experience in using instrumental methods for quantitative chemical analysis. Laboratory work consists of several assigned experiments that use instrumental techniques such as liquid and gas chromatography, UV spectrophotometry and fluorometry, mass spectrometry, and voltammetry. This laboratory concludes with an instrumental analysis project that is researched and designed by student groups.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Chemistry 330; Chemistry 224 (230) and 233

CHEM 330 required.

CHEM 344.00 Quantum Chemistry 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58170

Trish A Ferrett

This course introduces quantum mechanics with an emphasis on chemical and spectroscopic applications. The focus will be on atomic and molecular quantum behavior involving electrons, rotations, and vibrations. The objective is to develop both a deeper understanding of bonding as well as an appreciation of how spectroscopy provides insight into the microscopic world of molecules.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128, Mathematics 120 or 211 and six credits from Physics 131 to 165

CLAS 123.00 Greek Archaeology and Art 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 35, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59188

Alex R Knodell

This course explores the archaeology and art of the Ancient Greek world. Beginning with prehistory, we will track the development of the material culture of Ancient Greece through the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and conclude by discussing aspects of the Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman empires that followed. We will focus throughout on aspects of archaeological practice, material culture and text, art and society, long-term social change, and the role of the past in the present.

CS 111.01 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58540

Layla K Oesper

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL1 (Synonym 58543)

CS 111.02 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58541

Sneha Narayan

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL2 (Synonym 58544)

CS 111.03 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:10pm7:00pm8:10pm7:00pm8:00pm
Synonym: 58542

David R Musicant

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

CS 111.04 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59563

James O Ryan

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

CS 201.01 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58545

Anya E Vostinar

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 201.WL1 (Synonym 58547)

CS 201.02 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58546

Aaron W Bauer

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

CS 311.00 Computer Graphics 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59560

Josh R Davis

Scientific simulations, movies, and video games often incorporate computer-generated images of fictitious worlds. How are these worlds represented inside a computer? How are they “photographed” to produce the images that we see? What performance constraints and design trade-offs come into play? In this course we learn the basic theory and methodology of three-dimensional computer graphics, including both triangle rasterization and ray tracing. Familiarity with vectors, matrices, and the C programming language is recommended but not required.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

CS 314.00 Data Visualization 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58565

Eric C Alexander

Understanding the wealth of data that surrounds us can be challenging. Luckily, we have evolved incredible tools for finding patterns in large amounts of information: our eyes! Data visualization is concerned with taking information and turning it into pictures to better communicate patterns or discover new insights. It combines aspects of computer graphics, human-computer interaction, design, and perceptual psychology. In this course, we will learn the different ways in which data can be expressed visually and which methods work best for which tasks. Using this knowledge, we will critique existing visualizations as well as design and build new ones.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

DGAH 110.00 Hacking the Humanities 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 58764

Austin P Mason

The digital world is infiltrating the academy and profoundly disrupting the arts and humanities, posing fundamental challenges to traditional models of university education, scholarly research, academic publication and creative production. This core course for the Digital Arts & Humanities minor introduces the key concepts, debates and technologies that shape DGAH, including text encoding, digital mapping (GIS), network analysis, data visualization, 3D imaging and basic programming languages. Students will learn to hack the humanities by making a collaborative, publishable DH project, while acquiring the skills and confidence necessary to actively participate in the digital world, both in college and beyond.

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59110

Michael T Hemesath

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59356

Eduard Storm

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.03 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59385

Yaniv Ben-Ami

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59112

Faress F Bhuiyan

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59113

Mark T Kanazawa

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59114

Jenny Bourne

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 267.00 Behavioral Economics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59125

Jonathan M Lafky

This course introduces experimental economics and behavioral economics as two complementary approaches to understanding economic decision making. We will study the use of controlled experiments to test and critique economic theories, as well as how these theories can be improved by introducing psychologically plausible assumptions to our models. We will read a broad survey of experimental and behavioral results, including risk and time preferences, prospect theory, other-regarding preferences, the design of laboratory and field experiments, and biases in decision making.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 271.00 Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59126

Mark T Kanazawa

This course focuses on environmental economics, energy economics, and the relationship between them. Economic incentives for pollution abatement, the industrial organization of energy production, optimal depletion rates of energy sources, and the environmental and economic consequences of alternate energy sources are analyzed.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 274.00 Labor Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59127

Faress F Bhuiyan

Why do some people choose to work and others do not? Why are some people paid higher wages than others? What are the economic benefits of education for the individual and for society? How do government policies, such as subsidized child care, the Earned Income Tax Credit and the income tax influence whether people work and the number of hours they choose to work? These are some of the questions examined in labor economics. This course will focus on the labor supply and human capital decisions of individuals and households.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 282.00 The Theory of Investment Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59387

Yaniv Ben-Ami

This course provides an introduction to the main financial instruments that are used to fund economic activity. We will explore how investment products function and learn how to price a few of them. Attention will be given to the choices investors make, and should make, when allocating portfolios. Topics include bond pricing, stock pricing, option pricing, the mortgage market, hedge funds, private equity, optimal portfolios, defaults, financial intermediary capital, and investors' behavioral biases.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 330.00 Intermediate Price Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59115

Jenny Bourne

An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111

ECON 331.00 Intermediate Macro Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59128

Nathan D Grawe

Analysis of the forces determining the general level of output, employment, and prices with special emphasis on the role of money and on interest rate determination. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275) or permission of the instructor and Economics 110 and 111

ENTS 120.52 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am1:45pm5:45pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59644

Tsegaye H Nega

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 120.WL2 (Synonym 59646)

ENTS 120.53 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 59645

Tsegaye H Nega

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 120.WL3 (Synonym 59647)

GEOL 110.52 Introduction to Geology and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am1:45pm5:45pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58280

Bereket Haileab

An introduction to the study of earth systems, physical processes operating on the earth, and the history of the earth.  Weekly online laboratories included.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken another 100-level Geology course

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 110.WL2 (Synonym 58281)

GEOL 315.53 Paleoclimate 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 58277

Dan P Maxbauer

The main objective of paleoclimatology is to reconstruct past climates in order to improve our understanding of the processes involved in controlling Earth’s climate at various timescales. This course will focus on climate reconstructions from local climate archives. Lab and some class time will be dedicated to group research projects. Reading and discussing primary literature is expected along with presentations and writing assignments related to research topics. Laboratories and one weekend field trip included.

Prerequisite: Two 200 level geology courses, or instructor consent

Extra Time Required

MUSC 204.00 Theory II: Musical Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 57752

Justin M London

An investigation into the nature of musical sounds and the way they are combined to form rhythms, melodies, harmonies, and form. Topics include the nature of musical pitch, the structure of musical scales and their influence on melody, chords and their interval content, the complexity of rhythmic patterns, and chromatic harmony and modulation. Student work includes building a musical instrument, programming a drum machine, writing computer code to create harmonies and timbres, and an extended music analysis project.

Prerequisite: Music 103, or permission of the instructor as assessed by a diagnostic exam administered at the start of the term

PHIL 303.00 Bias, Belief, Community, Emotion 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59662

Anna Moltchanova

What is important to individuals, how they see themselves and others, and the kind of projects they pursue are shaped by traditional and moral frameworks they didn’t choose. Individual selves are encumbered by their social environments and, in this sense, always ‘biased’, but some forms of bias are pernicious because they produce patterns of inter and intra-group domination and oppression. We will explore various forms of intersubjectivity and its asymmetries through readings in social ontology and social epistemology that theorize the construction of group and individual beliefs and identities in the context of the social world they engender.

Prerequisite: One Previous Philosophy course or instructor permission

PHYS 143.52 Physical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm5:45pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58220

Helen K Minsky

This course begins with an introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 144, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 143.WL2 (Synonym 58221)

PHYS 144.54 Astrophysical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm5:45pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58222

Barry N Costanzi, Chris J West

This course begins by considering basic principles of physics in the realm of planetary systems, black holes and dark matter in the universe. Conservation of energy and momentum will be used to explore large-scale phenomena in the cosmos. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 143, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students. Appropriate for students with prior calculus-based physics course such as an AP or IB course.

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 144.WL4 (Synonym 58224)

PHYS 144.57 Astrophysical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm8:00am12:00pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58223

Barry N Costanzi

This course begins by considering basic principles of physics in the realm of planetary systems, black holes and dark matter in the universe. Conservation of energy and momentum will be used to explore large-scale phenomena in the cosmos. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 143, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students. Appropriate for students with prior calculus-based physics course such as an AP or IB course.

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 144.WL7 (Synonym 58225)

PHYS 165.52 Introduction to Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am1:45pm5:45pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58226

David C Harrison

A study of the principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics with an emphasis on real-world applications including electronics, laser physics, astronomy, and medicine. Topics include electric and magnetic fields, electric potentials, DC and AC circuits, geometric and wave optics, and relevant properties of matter. Designed for science majors who want additional background in physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 143, 144, or 145. Mathematics 120 or 121 suggested

PHYS 165.59 Introduction to Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58227

David C Harrison

A study of the principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics with an emphasis on real-world applications including electronics, laser physics, astronomy, and medicine. Topics include electric and magnetic fields, electric potentials, DC and AC circuits, geometric and wave optics, and relevant properties of matter. Designed for science majors who want additional background in physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 143, 144, or 145. Mathematics 120 or 121 suggested

PHYS 231.00 Analytical and Computational Mechanics 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58228

Jay D Tasson

An analytical and computational treatment of classical mechanics using Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms. A variety of systems, including some whose equations of motion cannot be solved analytically, will be explored. Possible examples include harmonic oscillators, central-force problems, chaotic dynamics, astrophysical systems, and medieval siege engines.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 143 or 144 and Mathematics 210 or 211 or instructor permission

Formerly PHYS 229/230

PHYS 345.00 Advanced Optics 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 3, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 034

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm
Synonym: 58258

Marty Baylor

This is a laboratory course that will serve as a follow-up to Physics 344, Classical and Quantum Optics. Students will conduct a number of experiments pertaining to optical phenomena. The experiments will display effects pertaining to classical, quantum, and non-linear optics. The lab will take place once a week for four hours each session.

Prerequisite: Corequisite Physics 344 or permission of the instructor

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Krissy K Lunz Trujillo

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58834

Tun Myint

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 209.00 Money and Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 58846

Melanie Freeze

Modern elections have become multibillion-dollar ventures. How does money influence electoral and policy outcomes in the United States? Who donates and why do people or groups donate? Where does all the money go? How has campaign finance been regulated and what are proposed reforms? Focusing on recent elections, we will explore these questions by delving into the world of campaign finance.

POSC 212.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Kimberly K Smith

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58835

Eric S Mosinger

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275) or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5)

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58849

Greg G Marfleet

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 328.00 Foreign Policy Analysis* 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm9:30pm7:00pm9:30pm
Synonym: 58853

Greg G Marfleet

Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended.

PSYC 200.00 Measurement and Data Analysis in Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58334

Julie J Neiworth

The course considers the role of measurement and data analysis focused on behavioral sciences. Various forms of measurement and standards for the evaluation of measures are explored. Students learn how to summarize, organize, and evaluate data using a variety of techniques that are applicable to research in psychology and other disciplines. Among the analyses discussed and applied are tests of means, various forms of analysis of variance, correlation and regression, planned and post-hoc comparisons, as well as various non-parametric tests. Research design is also explored.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor consent; Concurrent registration in Psychology 201

PSYC 201 required.

PSYC 201.01 Measurement and Data Analysis Lab 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58335

Julie J Neiworth

This lab course accompanies the lecture course, Psychology 200, and must be taken during the same term. The lab will provide an opportunity to explore lecture topics more deeply, and in particular emphasize data collection and computational skills.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 and concurrent registration in Psychology 200

PSYC 200 required.

PSYC 201.02 Measurement and Data Analysis Lab 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58336

Julie J Neiworth

This lab course accompanies the lecture course, Psychology 200, and must be taken during the same term. The lab will provide an opportunity to explore lecture topics more deeply, and in particular emphasize data collection and computational skills.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 and concurrent registration in Psychology 200

PSYC 200 required.

PSYC 218.00 Hormones, Brain, and Behavior 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 58353

Sarah H Meerts

In this course, students will learn about how hormones act in the brain and the body to affect behaviors. This course draws heavily on biological psychology and students learn about techniques in neuroendocrinology to better understand cellular function, neural circuits, and the display of behaviors. Team-based learning and case studies are used to explore the endocrine system, sexual differentiation, the stress response, thirst and digestion, and reproductive behaviors. The experimental evidence upon which our understanding of hormones, brain, and behavior is constructed is emphasized.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110. Psychology 216 recommended or permission of the instructor

PSYC 221.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Sensation and Perception 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
9:00am12:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58355

Julia F Strand

This course accompanies Psychology 220. Students will replicate classical phenomena and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human perceptual processes. Psychology 221 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 220. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

PSYC 220 required

PSYC 221.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Sensation and Perception 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm4:45pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58356

Julia F Strand

This course accompanies Psychology 220. Students will replicate classical phenomena and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human perceptual processes. Psychology 221 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 220. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

PSYC 220 required

PSYC 233.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 58306

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with CGSC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both to complete the LS requirement

Prerequisite: Psychology 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or instructor permission.

PSYC 232 required. Cross listed with CGSC 233.

Cross-listed with CGSC 233.01

PSYC 233.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 58307

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with CGSC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both to complete the LS requirement

Prerequisite: Psychology 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or instructor permission.

PSYC 232 required. Cross listed with CGSC 233.

Cross-listed with CGSC 233.02

PSYC 253.01 Research Methods in Personality 2 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Olin 06

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58359

Neil S Lutsky

A laboratory to undertake research on topics in personality. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 252. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 252 and 253 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 252 required

PSYC 253.02 Research Methods in Personality 2 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Olin 06

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58360

Neil S Lutsky

A laboratory to undertake research on topics in personality. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 252. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 252 and 253 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 252 required

SOAN 314.00 Contemporary Issues in Critical Criminology 6 credits

Annette M Nierobisz

In this course we examine contemporary criminological issues from the critical perspectives offered by sociologists. Topics under examination include: how crime is conventionally defined, measured, and theorized; societal reactions to crime; and punishment of those who are deemed criminal. While exploring these topics, we will consider the impact of race, gender, and social class in shaping individuals’ interactions with the U.S. criminal justice system. Students will also seek a cross-national comparative understanding. Course readings primarily consist of theoretical and ethnographic accounts supplemented with statistical summaries.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

STAT 120.01 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 57873

Samuel D Ihlenfeldt

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 120.02 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 57874

Samuel D Ihlenfeldt

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: STAT 120.WL2 (Synonym 57879)

STAT 120.03 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 57875

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: STAT 120.WL3 (Synonym 57878)

STAT 220.00 Introduction to Data Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58603

Katie R St. Clair

(Formerly Mathematics 285) This course will cover the computational side of data analysis, including data acquisition, management, and visualization tools. Topics may include: data scraping, clean up and manipulation, data visualization using packages such as ggplots, understanding and visualizing spatial and network data, and supervised and unsupervised classification methods. We will use the statistics software R in this course.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275)

Formerly Mathematics 285

STAT 230.00 Applied Regression Analysis 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58604

Laura M Chihara

(Formerly Mathematics 245) A second course in statistics covering simple linear regression, multiple regression and ANOVA, and logistic regression. Exploratory graphical methods, model building and model checking techniques will be emphasized with extensive use of statistical software to analyze real-life data.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275), Psychology 200, or AP Statistics Exam score of 4 or 5.

Formerly Mathematics 245

STAT 250.00 Introduction to Statistical Inference 6 credits

Closed: Size: 28, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58606

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly Mathematics 275) Introduction to modern mathematical statistics. The mathematics underlying fundamental statistical concepts will be covered as well as applications of these ideas to real-life data. Topics include: resampling methods (permutation tests, bootstrap intervals), classical methods (parametric hypothesis tests and confidence intervals), parameter estimation, goodness-of-fit tests, regression, and Bayesian methods. The statistical package R will be used to analyze data sets.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 240 Probability (formerly Mathematics 265)

Formerly Mathematics 275

STAT 285.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:10pm
Synonym: 59415

Katie R St. Clair

(Formerly MATH 280) Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) and instructor permission

Formerly Mathematics 280

STAT 285.02 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 60000

Katie R St. Clair

(Formerly MATH 280) Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) and instructor permission

Formerly Mathematics 280

STAT 330.00 Advanced Statistical Modeling 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58611

Laura M Chihara

(Formerly MATH 345) Topics include linear mixed effects models for repeated measures, longitudinal or hierarchical data and generalized linear models (of which logistic and Poisson regression are special cases) including zero-inflated Poisson models. Depending on time, additional topics could include survival analysis, generalized additive models or models for spatial data.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 and 250 (formerly Mathematics 245 and 275) or permission of the instructor

Formerly Mathematics 345

Search for Courses

This data updates hourly. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the Search for Classes option in The Hub

Instructional Mode
Class Period
Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests