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AFST 230.00 Black Diaspora, Politics of Place 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 57853

Ahmed S Ibrahim

Central to diasporic identity formation and imagination is the simultaneous belonging to a multiplicity of places. For black diasporic subjects, struggles against oppression and for new political futures inspire transgression against normative political boundaries. This class explores the role of place and politics in the making of the black diaspora in Europe and the Americas. It emphasizes the intellectual and political connections and the sense of shared identity and destiny. Through an interdisciplinary approach, this course will offer a global history of race, identity, and politics through the lens of the black diaspora.

AMST 244.00 Approaches to Indigenous Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59069

Meredith L McCoy

Indigenous Studies is both a body of content knowledge and a research methodology. This course provides an overview of the history of exploitative research dynamics between universities and Indigenous peoples while exposing students to alternative methodologies that center Indigenous perspectives and research priorities. Students will discuss what it means to be an ethical research partner as they learn about decolonizing and Indigenous research strategies. This course brings together ideas from History, Anthropology, Law, Public Health, Education, Literature, Art, and Social Work to evaluate studies relating to Indigenous peoples for their methods, contributions, and ethics.

CCST 208.00 International Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm
Synonym: 59062

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Have you just returned from Asia, Africa, Europe, or South America? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with the culture (and, when appropriate, the language) you left behind. Relying on magazines and newspapers around the world, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. You may choose to read the press in the local language, or read English-language media about your region, meeting once each week for conversational exchange. (Language of conversation is English.)

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CCST 398.00 The Cross-Cultural Panorama: A Capstone Workshop 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:15pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59064

Scott D Carpenter

The work of Cross-Cultural Studies traverses many disciplines, often engaging with experiences that are difficult to capture in traditional formats. In this course students will create an ePortfolio that reflects, deepens, and narrates the various forms of cross-cultural experience they have had at Carleton, drawing on coursework and off-campus study, as well as such extra-curricular activities as talks, service learning, internships and fellowships. Guided by readings and prompts, students will write a reflective essay articulating the coherence of the parts, describing both the process and the results of their pathway through the minor. Considered a capstone for CCST, but for anyone looking to thread together their experiences across culture. Course is taught as a workshop. 

CLAS 123.00 Greek Archaeology and Art 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 35, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59188

Alex R Knodell

This course explores the archaeology and art of the Ancient Greek world. Beginning with prehistory, we will track the development of the material culture of Ancient Greece through the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and conclude by discussing aspects of the Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman empires that followed. We will focus throughout on aspects of archaeological practice, material culture and text, art and society, long-term social change, and the role of the past in the present.

CLAS 240.00 Rome: From Village to Superpower 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58957

Jake N Morton

This class will investigate how Rome rose from a humble village of outcasts and refugees to become the preeminent power in the entire Mediterranean. We will trace Rome's political evolution from kings to the Republic, alongside their gradual takeover of the Italian peninsula. We will study how Rome then swiftly overpowered what had been the most powerful kingdoms in the Mediterranean and established themselves as dominant. Who were these Romans and what were their political, military, religious, and social systems that enabled them to accomplish so much? What critical events shaped their development and ultimately led to total political control of the Mediterranean world? Students who previously took Classics 228 cannot take Classics 240.

DANC 266.00 Reading The Dancing Body 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58762

Judith A Howard

Dance is a field in which bodies articulate a history of sexuality, nation, gender, and race. In this course, the investigation of the body as a “text” will be anchored by intersectional and feminist perspectives. We will re-center American concert dance history, emphasizing the Africanist base of American Dance performance, contemporary black choreographers, and Native American concert dance. Through reading, writing, discussing, moving, viewing videos and performances the class will “read” the gender, race, and politics of the dancing body in the cultural/historical context of Modern, Post Modern and Contemporary Dance.

DGAH 110.00 Hacking the Humanities 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 58764

Austin P Mason

The digital world is infiltrating the academy and profoundly disrupting the arts and humanities, posing fundamental challenges to traditional models of university education, scholarly research, academic publication and creative production. This core course for the Digital Arts & Humanities minor introduces the key concepts, debates and technologies that shape DGAH, including text encoding, digital mapping (GIS), network analysis, data visualization, 3D imaging and basic programming languages. Students will learn to hack the humanities by making a collaborative, publishable DH project, while acquiring the skills and confidence necessary to actively participate in the digital world, both in college and beyond.

EUST 110.00 The Nation State in Europe 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58767

Paul Petzschmann

This course explores the role of the nation and nationalism within modern Europe and the ways in which ideas and myths about the nation have complemented and competed with conceptions of Europe as a geographic, cultural and political unity. We will explore the intellectual roots of nationalism in different countries as well as their artistic, literary and musical expressions. In addition to examining nationalism from a variety of disciplinary perspectives--sociology, anthropology, history, political science--we will explore some of the watershed, moments of European nationalism such as the French Revolution, the two world wars, and the Maastricht treaty.

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm
Synonym: 59271

Cherif Keïta

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 59272)

GERM 212.00 Contemporary Germany in Global Context 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 57888

Seth E Peabody

Over the past few years, Germany has been touted as the new leader of Europe, or even of the “free world,” and at the same time has seen a surge of bitter political division within its borders. The Berlin Wall fell thirty years ago, yet tensions between East and West remain stark. Chancellor Angela Merkel implemented an open-arms policy toward refugees, yet the extremist AfD party has orchestrated a troubling rise to power based on xenophobic sentiments. And while Germany has emerged as a global environmental leader, it has simultaneously faced passionate protest from its own youth regarding failure to meet the challenges of climate change. In this class, we examine the complexities behind these seeming contradictions in contemporary Germany by analyzing diverse texts ranging from political speeches to poetry slams. Taught in German; advanced grammar review supports analytical tasks.

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent

HIST 128.00 Slavery and Universities: Past and Present 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59448

Mike E Jirik

This class examines the history of colleges and universities and their connections to the political economy of Atlantic slavery and colonialism. Students will examine how the inception and evolution of American higher education was inextricably tied to the pocketbooks of enslavers as well as how colleges and universities directly benefited from the labor of enslaved people and the dispossession of Native Americans. Students will consider questions such as what is the role of the university in society. Central to the course will be studying this history’s impact in our own time. We will examine how scholars, activists, and university communities are grappling with these histories and their legacies today.

HIST 131.00 Saints and Society in Late Antiquity 6 credits

William L North

In Late Antiquity (200-800 CE), certain men and women around the Mediterranean and beyond came to occupy a special place in the minds and lives of their contemporaries: they were known as holy men and women or saints. What led people to perceive someone as holy? What were the consequences of holiness for the persons themselves and the surrounding societies? When they intervene in their worlds, what are their sources of authority and power?  How did these holy figures relate to the established institutions--secular and religious--that surrounded them?  Working with a rich array of evidence, we will explore themes such as asceticism, embodied and verbal pedagogy, wealth and poverty, work, marginality, cultural difference, and protest/resistance. We will journey from the lands of Gaul, Italy, and Spain to North Africa and Egypt and the Holy Land, to Armenia and the Fertile Crescent.

Extra Time Required

HIST 154.00 Social Movements in Postwar Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 57834

Seungjoo Yoon

This course tackles an evolving meaning of democracy and sovereignty in postwar Japan shaped by the transformative power of its social movements. We will place the anti-nuclear movement and anti-base struggles of the 1950s, the protest movements against revision of the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty of the 1960s, and environmentalist movements against the U.S. Cold War projects in Asia to see how they intersect with the worldwide “New Left” movements of the 1960s. Topics include student activism, labor unionism, Marxist movements, and gangsterism (yakuza). Students will engage with political art, photographs, manga, films, reportage, memoirs, autobiographies, interview records, novels, and detective stories.

HIST 159.00 Disaster, Disease, & Rumors in East Asia 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59769

Seungjoo Yoon

How are rumors generated and transmitted in a period of high anxiety like disaster? Do rumors and anxiety reciprocate? How do rumors enhance existing stereotypes and prejudices of people? Why do rumors arise in a society that suffers from inadequate information or the complete cutoff in communication? This course classifies the types and nature of rumors at the time of making modern East Asia. Thematically, it examines the interplay between wartime science, environmental conditions, and societal capacities in modern Japan, Korea, and China. Topics include rumor panics generated by epidemic, water pollution, atomic bomb, famine politics, industrial toxins, and lab leaks. 

HIST 175.00 Gender and Sexuality in Latin American History 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59433

Jennifer L Schaefer

This course analyzes constructions of gender and sexuality in Latin America from the pre-colonial and colonial periods through nation building in the nineteenth century and globalization in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Drawing on sources including testimonies, legal documents, memoirs, and art, it considers how social, political, and economic structures created unequal power relations as well as how individuals moved within these frameworks, at times even challenging them. In particular, it explores how the racial and ethnic inequalities created through conquest, colonialism, and slavery both shaped and were shaped by gender and sexuality, as well as how these inequalities persisted.

HIST 200.00 Historians for Hire 2 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 2, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am
Synonym: 58961

Antony E Adler

A two-credit course in which students work with faculty oversight to complete a variety of public history projects with community partners. Students will work on a research project requiring them to identify and analyze primary sources, draw conclusions from the primary source research, and share their research with the appropriate audience in an appropriate form. We meet once a week at Carleton to ensure students maintain professional standards and strong relationships in their work. Potential projects include educational programming, historical society archival work, and a variety of local history opportunities. 

Extra Time Required

HIST 211.00 Revolts and Resistance in Early America 6 credits

Serena R Zabin

Far from being a single entity, America in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was a world of vibrant, polyglot, globally linked, and violent societies. In this course we will learn how the enslavement of Africans and Native Americans created a state of war that bridged Europe, America, and Africa. We will examine how indigenous resistance to European settlement reshaped landscapes and cultures. We will focus throughout on the daily lives of the women and men who created and shaped the vast world of early America.

HIST 226.00 U.S. Consumer Culture 6 credits

Annette R Igra

In the period after 1880, the growth of a mass consumer society recast issues of identity, gender, race, class, family, and political life. We will explore the development of consumer culture through such topics as advertising and mass media, the body and sexuality, consumerist politics in the labor movement, and the response to the Americanization of consumption abroad. We will read contemporary critics such as Thorstein Veblen, as well as historians engaged in weighing the possibilities of abundance against the growth of corporate power.

HIST 230.00 Black Americans and the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59449

Mike E Jirik

What does a most turbulent period in U.S. history look like from the perspectives of Black women and men? What role did Black thought and resistance play in shaping the outcome of the war? What was interracial democracy during Reconstruction and why was it ultimately overthrown? These are a few of the myriad questions we will seek to answer by studying the central role of Black Americans in the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. We will examine how Black people participated in and shaped the politics of this period and we will critically engage the meanings of freedom, emancipation, and democracy.

HIST 250.00 Modern Germany 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58964

David G Tompkins

This course offers a comprehensive examination of German history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will look at the German-speaking peoples of Central Europe through the prism of politics, society, culture, and the economy. Through a range of readings, we will grapple with the many complex and contentious issues that have made German history such an interesting area of intellectual inquiry.

HIST 266.00 History of Islam in South Asia 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 310

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59659

Brendan P LaRocque

While Islam in popular thought is often associated solely with the Arab world, in reality eighty percent of the world’s Muslim population is not of Arab ethnicity.  The countries of South Asia--particularly India, Pakistan and Bangladesh--are collectively home to the largest number of Muslims. After examining the early background of the appearance and growth of Islamic societies and governments, we will explore the rich history of the expansion of Islam into the Indian subcontinent. We will take account of the role of trade and conquest in the early centuries of Islamic expansion and study the development of specifically Indian forms of Islam. The nature and impact of the Indo-Islamic empires will receive our attention, as will the interaction of Muslims with non-Muslim communities in medieval and early modern India. This will be followed by a look at the period of colonial rule, and an analysis of the specific historical contexts that gave rise to specific religious nationalist movements. We will then trace out how, once established, these movements developed according to their changing relationships to national liberation movements, secularism, state administrative systems, global economic shifts, and changing social demands. 

HIST 298.00 Junior Colloquium 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

CMC 306

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58966

Susannah R Ottaway

In the junior year, majors must take this six-credit reading and discussion course taught each year by different members of the department faculty. The course is also required for the History minor. The general purpose of History 298 is to help students reach a more sophisticated understanding of the nature of history as a discipline and of the approaches and methods of historians. A major who is considering off-campus study in the junior year should consult with their adviser on when to take History 298.

Prerequisite: At least two six credit courses in History (excluding HIST 100 and Independents) at Carleton.

Required for History majors and minors

HIST 308.00 American Cities and Nature 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Since the nation's founding, the percentage of Americans living in cities has risen nearly sixteenfold, from about five percent to the current eighty-one percent. This massive change has spawned legions of others, and all of them have bearing on the complex ways that American cities and city-dwellers have shaped and reshaped the natural world. This course will consider the nature of cities in American history, giving particular attention to the dynamic linkages binding these cultural epicenters to ecological communities, environmental forces and resource flows, to eco-politics and social values, and to those seemingly far-away places we call farms and wilderness. 

Prerequisite: History 205 or permission of the instructor

HIST 360.00 Muslims and Modernity 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

Prerequisite: At least one prior course in the history of the Middle East or Central Asia or Islam

HIST 398.01 Advanced Historical Writing 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58969

Thabiti C Willis

This course is designed to support majors in developing advanced skills in historical research and writing. Through a combination of class discussion, small group work, and one-on-one interactions with the professor, majors learn the process of constructing sophisticated, well-documented, and well-written historical arguments within the context of an extended project of their own design. They also learn and practice strategies for engaging critically with contemporary scholarship and effective techniques of peer review and the oral presentation of research. Concurrent enrollment in History 400 required. By permission of the instructor only.

HIST 400 required.

HIST 398.02 Advanced Historical Writing 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 58970

Annette R Igra

This course is designed to support majors in developing advanced skills in historical research and writing. Through a combination of class discussion, small group work, and one-on-one interactions with the professor, majors learn the process of constructing sophisticated, well-documented, and well-written historical arguments within the context of an extended project of their own design. They also learn and practice strategies for engaging critically with contemporary scholarship and effective techniques of peer review and the oral presentation of research. Concurrent enrollment in History 400 required. By permission of the instructor only.

HIST 400 required.

IDSC 251.01 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm9:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59242

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

IDSC 251.02 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59243

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

PHIL 113.00 The Individual and the Political Community 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59048

Allison E Murphy

Are human beings radically individual and atomic by nature, political animals, or something else? However we answer that question, what difference does it make for our understanding of the ways in which larger political communities come into existence and are maintained? In this course we will explore these and related questions while reading two of the most foundational works in political theory, Plato’s Republic and Hobbes’s Leviathan, as well as several contemporary pieces influenced by these thinkers.

PHIL 116.00 Sensation, Induction, Abduction, Deduction, Seduction 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59050

Jason A Decker

In every academic discipline, we make theories and argue for and against them. This is as true of theology as of geology (and as true of phys ed as of physics). What are the resources we have available to us in making these arguments? It's tempting to split the terrain into (i) raw data, and (ii) rules of right reasoning for processing the data. The most obvious source of raw data is sense experience, and the most obvious candidates for modes of right reasoning are deduction, induction, and abduction. Some philosophers, however, think that sense perception is only one of several sources of raw data (perhaps we also have a faculty of pure intuition or maybe a moral sense), and others have doubted that we have any source of raw data at all. As for the modes of "right" reasoning, Hume famously worried about our (in)ability to justify induction, and others have had similar worries about abduction and even deduction. Can more be said on behalf of our most strongly held beliefs and belief-forming practices than simply that we find them seductive---that we are attracted to them; that they resonate with us? In this course, we'll use some classic historical and contemporary philosophical texts to help us explore these and related issues.

PHIL 217.00 Reason in Context: Limitations and Possibilities 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59660

Allison E Murphy

Our reflection on significant human questions is often (perhaps always) embedded within a larger set of cultural or personal theoretical commitments. Such embeddedness suggests our reflection cannot achieve the standard of objectivity characteristic of a traditional ideal of rationality. Is this realization to be welcomed insofar as it weakens traditional dogmatic claims to truth and the associated implication that certain views or frameworks are superior to others? Or, in spite of the unmooring of the philosophical tradition from set criteria, do we still find ourselves committed to some ordering of rank and, if so, how do we make sense of this? In this course we'll examine these questions as they arise in the writings of Nietzsche, Heidegger and other continental philosophers. We will devote part of the course to the ancient sources (Plato and Aristotle) with whom the continental philosophers are in conversation.

PHIL 228.00 Freedom and Alienation in Black American Philosophy 6 credits

Eddie E O'Byrn

The struggle of freedom against forms of alienation is both a historical and contemporary characteristic of Black/African-American philosophy. In this course we will explore how a variety of Black/African-American philosophers theorize these concepts. The aim of the course is to both offer resources for familiarizing students with African-American philosophers and develop an appreciation for critical philosophical voices in the Black intellectual tradition. The course will range from slave narratives, reconstruction, and civil rights to contemporary prison abolitionism, intersectionality, and afro-pessimism. The texts of the course will include: Angela Davis’ Lectures on Liberation, Frederick Douglass’ Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells Southern Horrors, George Yancy’s African-American Philosophers 17 Conversations, and Afro-Pessimism: An Introduction. As well as select articles from historical and contemporary Black/African-American philosophers.

PHIL 272.00 Early Modern Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59052

Douglas B Marshall

This course offers an introduction to major aspects of European theories of being and knowledge during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Key topics to be examined include:  the distinction between the mind and the body; the existence and nature of God; the relationship between cause and effect; the scope and nature of human knowledge. We will place a special emphasis on understanding the philosophical thought of René Descartes, Anne Conway, G. W. Leibniz, and David Hume. Two themes will recur throughout the course: first, the evolving relationships between philosophy and the sciences of the period; second, the philosophical contributions of women in the early modern era.

PHIL 303.00 Bias, Belief, Community, Emotion 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59662

Anna Moltchanova

What is important to individuals, how they see themselves and others, and the kind of projects they pursue are shaped by traditional and moral frameworks they didn’t choose. Individual selves are encumbered by their social environments and, in this sense, always ‘biased’, but some forms of bias are pernicious because they produce patterns of inter and intra-group domination and oppression. We will explore various forms of intersubjectivity and its asymmetries through readings in social ontology and social epistemology that theorize the construction of group and individual beliefs and identities in the context of the social world they engender.

Prerequisite: One Previous Philosophy course or instructor permission

POSC 160.00 Political Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58833

Laurence D Cooper

Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions.

POSC 262.00 Displaced Lives: Freedom and Meaning 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59670

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

To feel secure and accepted by society are essential human needs. However, even a cursory look at the 20th century shows how often and unexpectedly the lives of individuals were profoundly disrupted and crushed by the forces of nature and history. Security and social acceptance are fragile gifts of history. If so, what freedom and meaning, if at all, are to be found in living a displaced life, against and through the destructive tidal waves of history? The course tries to answer this question through an engagement with the memoirs and writings of Stefan Zweig, Edward Said, Norman Manea, Mikhail Bulgakov, Karl Ove Knausgaard, and James Baldwin.

RELG 110.00 Understanding Religion 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58984

Elizabeth F Dolfi

How can we best understand the role of religion in the world today, and how should we interpret the meaning of religious traditions -- their texts and practices -- in history and culture? This class takes an exciting tour through selected themes and puzzles related to the fascinating and diverse expressions of religion throughout the world. From politics and pop culture, to religious philosophies and spiritual practices, to rituals, scriptures, gender, religious authority, and more, students will explore how these issues emerge in a variety of religions, places, and historical moments in the U.S. and across the globe.

RELG 121.00 Introduction to Christianity 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59648

Caleb S Hendrickson

This course will trace the history of Christianity from its origins in the villages of Palestine, to its emergence as the official religion of the Roman Empire, and through its evolution and expansion as the world's largest religion. The course will focus on events, persons, and ideas that have had the greatest impact on the history of Christianity, and examine how this tradition has evolved in different ways in response to different needs, cultures, and tensions--political and otherwise--around the world. This is an introductory course. No familiarity with the Bible, Christianity, or the academic study of religion is presupposed.

RELG 239.00 Religion & American Landscape 6 credits

Michael D McNally

The American landscape is rich in sacred places.  The religious imaginations, practices, and beliefs of its diverse inhabitants have shaped that landscape and been shaped by it. This course explores ways of imagining relationships between land, community, and the sacred, the mapping of religious traditions onto American land and cityscapes, and theories of sacred space and spatial practices. Topics include religious place-making practices of Indigenous, Latinx, and African Americans, as well as those of Euro-American communities from Puritans, Mormons, immigrant farmers.

RELG 250.00 It’s the End of the World: Religion, Moral Panics, and Apocalypses 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59512

Elizabeth F Dolfi

Pandemics, global climate destabilization, the collapse of good order, the rise and fall of empires, and life at the edge of civilization -- for many religious communities, in many historical moments, it has seemed clear that the world is ending. In this course, we will examine some of the ways that religious communities in the United States have imagined and narrativized impending apocalypse(es) and the problem of living when the world is falling apart. Emphasizing the cultural politics of apocalypticism, this course will explore race, gender, affect, ritual practice, epistemology, and community formation in contexts including nineteenth century millennialist movements, alien abductions, contemporary conspiracy theories, sex panics, indigenous resistance to colonialism, cold war apocalyptic literature, and Afro-futurist responses to climate collapse.

RELG 284.00 Art and Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59413

Caleb S Hendrickson

For much of recorded history, what we now call “art” and what we now call “religion” were inseparable. In the modern period, art and religion have gone their separate ways. What, if anything, continues to connect them? Is art inherently religious? Can religion be considered a form of art? In this class, we look at modern works of art (from Renaissance painting to contemporary performance art) alongside the sights and sounds of religion (including the symbols, rituals, and architecture of multiple religious traditions), seeking points of confluence and displacement between these apparently disparate areas of culture. 

RELG 287.00 Many Marys 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

The history of Christianity usually focuses on Jesus: the stories and doctrines that have revolved around him. This course will focus on Mary and the many ways she has contributed to the various lived traditions of Christianity. We will, for example, consider the mother of Jesus (Miriam, as she was first called) as she has figured in literature, art, apparition, and ritual practice around the world. We will also consider Mary Magdalene, her foil, who appears in popular discourse from the Gnostic gospels to The Da Vinci Code. Case studies, texts, images, and film will be our fare.

RELG 300.00 Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58986

Michael D McNally

What, exactly, is religion and what conditions of modernity have made it urgent to articulate such a question in the first place? Why does religion exert such force in human society and history? Is it an opiate of the masses or an illusion laden with human wish-fulfillment? Is it a social glue? A subjective experience of the sacred? Is it simply a universalized Protestant Christianity in disguise, useful in understanding, and colonizing, the non-Christian world? This seminar, for junior majors and advanced majors from related fields, explores generative theories from anthropology, sociology, psychology, literary studies, and the history of religions.

RELG 399.00 Senior Research Seminar 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58988

Asuka Sango

This seminar will acquaint students with research tools in various fields of religious studies, provide an opportunity to present and discuss research work in progress, hone writing skills, and improve oral presentation techniques.

Prerequisite: Religion 300 and acceptance of proposal for senior integrative exercise and instructor permission.

SPAN 209.00 Radio and News in Spanish 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 10, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am
Synonym: 59311

Palmar M Alvarez-Blanco

Are you interested in talking about current news while practicing your oral skills in Spanish? Have you ever considered participating in a radio program? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with your Spanish while collaborating with “El Super Barrio Latino” a radio program conducted by the Latinx community of Northfield. In each program we will explore international and domestic news and we will interview people in our community. Relying on international newspapers, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. (Language of conversation is Spanish)

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

THEA 270.00 Art and (Un)Freedom 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59685

Lizbett J Benge

Underpinned by women of color feminisms, abolitionism, and socially engaged performance practices, this course unpacks how art is a vehicle for social change in spaces of unfreedom such as: jails, prisons, ICE facilities, detention centers, and group home facilities. Work for the class will include readings and creative reading responses, researching case studies, and reflective assignments. As a culminating project, students will create individual performance-based works informed by critical understandings of punishment, crime, enslavement, surveillance, and/or state violence.  

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