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ARBC 310.00 Advanced Media Arabic 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59200

Zaki A Haidar

Readings of excerpts from the Arabic press and listening to news editions, commentaries and other radio and TV programs from across the Arab world. Emphasis is on vocabulary expansion, text comprehension strategies, and further development of reading and listening comprehension. Class includes oral discussions and regular written assignments in Arabic.

Prerequisite: Arabic 206 or equivalent

ARTH 102.00 Introduction to Art History II 6 credits

Open: Size: 60, Registered: 50, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 57983

Ross K Elfline, Jessica F Keating

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from the fifteenth century through the present. The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, humanist and Reformation redefinitions of art in the Italian and Northern Renaissance, realism, modernity and tradition, the tension between self-expression and the art market, and the use of art for political purposes.

ARTH 171.00 History of Photography 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59639

Baird E Jarman

This course covers nineteenth and twentieth century photography from its origins to the present. It will consider formal innovations in the medium, the role of photography in society, and the place of photography in the fine arts.

ARTH 240.00 Art Since 1945 6 credits

Ross K Elfline

Art from abstract expressionism to the present, with particular focus on issues such as the modernist artist-hero; the emergence of alternative or non-traditional media; the influence of the women's movement and the gay/lesbian liberation movement on contemporary art; and postmodern theory and practice.

Prerequisite: Any one term of art history

ARTH 298.00 Seminar for Art History Majors 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57978

Jessica F Keating

An intensive study of the nature of art history as an intellectual discipline and of the approaches scholars have taken to various art historical problems. Attention as well to principles of current art historical research and writing. Recommended for juniors who have declared art history as a major.

CAMS 110.00 Introduction to Cinema and Media Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59664

Carol Donelan

This course introduces students to the basic terms, concepts and methods used in cinema studies and helps build critical skills for analyzing films, technologies, industries, styles and genres, narrative strategies and ideologies. Students will develop skills in critical viewing and careful writing via assignments such as a short response essay, a plot segmentation, a shot breakdown, and various narrative and stylistic analysis papers. Classroom discussion focuses on applying critical concepts to a wide range of films. Requirements include two evening film screenings per week. Extra time.

Sophomore Priority. Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 110.WL0 (Synonym 59665)

CAMS 187.00 Cult Television and Fan Cultures 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm
Synonym: 58136

Candace I Moore

This course focuses on the history, production, and consumption of cult television. The beginning of the seminar will be focused on critically examining a number of theoretical approaches to the study of genre and fandom. Building on these approaches, the remainder of the course will focus on cult television case studies from the last eight decades. We will draw on recent scholarship to explore how cult television functions textually, industrially, and culturally. Additionally, we will study fan communities on the Internet and consider how fansites, webisodes, and sites like YouTube and Netflix transform television genres.

Extra Time Required, evening screenings

CAMS 214.00 Film History III 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58128

Jay S Beck

This course is designed to introduce students to recent film history, 1970-present, and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. The course charts the development of national cinemas since the 1970s while considering the effects of media consolidation and digital convergence. Moreover, the course examines how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form in the twenty-first century.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CAMS 246.00 Documentary Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 58143

Cecilia M Cornejo

This course explores the relevance and influence of documentary films by closely examining the aesthetic concerns and ethical implications inherent in these productions. We study these works both as artistic undertakings and as documents produced within a specific time, culture, and ideology. Central to our understanding of the form are issues of technology, methodology, and ethics, which are examined thematically as well as chronologically. The course offers an overview of the major historical movements in documentary film along more recent works; it combines screenings, readings, and discussions with the goal of preparing students to both understand and analyze documentary films.

Extra Time Required, weekly evening screenings T 7-9

CHIN 239.00 Digital China: Media, Culture, and Society 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 57835

Shaohua Guo

This course invites students to critically examine digital media technologies in relation to social change, cultural innovation, and popular entertainment. Drawing on literature from media, literary, and cultural studies, the course engages in topics such as new media institutions, Internet businesses, global activism, gender and sexuality, and mobile applications. Special attention is paid to the implications that digital media bring forth within particular social and historical contexts, as well as the ways in which the Internet serves as the site for the negotiation of various political, economic, and cultural forces. In translation.

In translation

CHIN 349.00 Tasting China: Regional Geography and Food Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57964

Lin Deng

This course creates a virtual journey that enriches students’ knowledge and understanding of Chinese food culture in geographical context through a range of textual and non-textual materials including essays by renowned writers and food critics, illustrated book chapters and magazine articles and reports, and acclaimed documentary films and videos. The course will familiarize students with culturally authentic and stylistically appropriate vocabulary and structures commonly found in cultural narratives, increase their ability to converse with extended discourse in topics relating to food culture, and enhance their comprehension and writing skills of literary and written Chinese.

Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or equivalent.

ENGL 112.00 Introduction to the Novel 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58902

Jessica L Leiman

This course explores the history and form of the British novel, tracing its development from a strange, sensational experiment in the eighteenth century to a dominant literary genre today. Among the questions that we will consider: What is a novel? What makes it such a popular form of entertainment? How does the novel participate in ongoing conversations about family, sex, class, race, and nation? How did a genre once considered a source of moral corruption become a legitimate literary form? Authors include: Daniel Defoe, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Bram Stoker, Virginia Woolf, and Jackie Kay.

ENGL 118.00 Introduction to Poetry 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58903

Constance Walker

We will look at the whole kingdom of poetry, exploring how poets use form, tone, sound, imagery, rhythm, and subject matter to create what Wallace Stevens called the "supreme fiction." Examples will be drawn from around the world, from Sappho to spoken word. Participation in discussion is mandatory; essay assignments will ask you to provide close readings of particular works; a couple of assignments will focus on the writing of poems so as to give you a full understanding of this ancient and living art.

ENGL 203.00 Other Worlds of Medieval English Literature 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 57896

George G Shuffelton

When medieval writers imagined worlds beyond their own, what did they see?  This course will examine depictions of the afterlife, the East, and magical realms of the imagination. We will read romances, saints' lives, and a masterpiece of pseudo-travel literature that influenced both Shakespeare and Columbus, alongside contemporary theories of postcolonialism, gender and race. We will visit the lands of the dead and the undead, and compare gruesome punishments and heavenly rewards. We will encounter dog-headed men, Amazons, cannibals, armies devoured by hippopotami, and roasted geese that fly onto waiting dinner tables. Be prepared. Readings in Middle English and in modern translations.

ENGL 214.00 Revenge Tragedy 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59673

Pierre Hecker

Madness, murder, conspiracy, poison, incest, rape, ghosts, and lots of blood: the fashion for revenge tragedy in Elizabethan and Jacobean England led to the creation of some of the most brilliant, violent, funny, and deeply strange plays in the history of the language. Authors may include Cary, Chapman, Ford, Marston, Middleton, Kyd, Tourneur, and Webster.

1st 5 weeks

ENGL 215.00 Modern American Literature 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59674

Michael J Kowalewski

A survey of some of the central movements and texts in American literature, from World War I to the present. Topics covered will include modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat generation and postmodernism.

ENGL 219.00 Global Shakespeare 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59675

Pierre Hecker

Shakespeare’s plays have been reimagined and repurposed all over the world, performed on seven continents, and translated into over 100 languages. The course explores how issues of globalization, nationalism, translation (both cultural and linguistic), and (de)colonization inform our understanding of these wonderfully varied adaptations and appropriations. We will examine the social, political, and aesthetic implications of a range of international stage, film, and literary versions as we consider how other cultures respond to the hegemonic original. No prior experience with Shakespeare is necessary.

2nd 5 weeks

ENGL 235.00 Asian American Literature 6 credits

Nancy J Cho

This course is an introduction to major works and authors of fiction, drama, and poetry from about 1900 to the present. We will trace the development of Asian American literary traditions while exploring the rich diversity of recent voices in the field. Authors to be read include Carlos Bulosan, Sui Sin Far, Philip Kan Gotanda, Maxine Hong Kingston, Jhumpa Lahiri, Milton Murayama, Chang-rae Lee, Li-young Lee, and John Okada.

ENGL 249.00 Modern Irish Literature: Poetry, Prose, and Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58914

Constance Walker

What can and should be the role of literature in times of bitter political conflict? Caught in partisan strife, Irish writers have grappled personally and painfully with the question. We will read works by Joyce, Yeats, and Heaney, among others, and watch films (Bloody SundayHunger) that confront the deep and ongoing divisions in Irish political life.

ENGL 258.00 Playwrights of Color: Taking the Stage 6 credits

Nancy J Cho

This course examines work by U.S. playwrights of color from the 1950s to the present, focusing on questions of race, performance, and self-representation. We will consider opportunities and limitations of the commercial theater, Off-Off Broadway, ethnic theaters, and non-traditional performance spaces. Playwrights may include Alice Childress, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ntozake Shange, Luis Valdez, Cherrie Moraga, August Wilson, David Henry Hwang, Philip Gotanda, Maria Irene Fornes, Anna Deavere Smith, and Chay Yew. We will watch selected film adaptations and attend a live performance when possible. 

ENGL 310.00 Shakespeare II 6 credits

Pierre Hecker

Continuing the work begun in Shakespeare I, this course delves deeper into the Shakespeare canon. More difficult and obscure plays are studied alongside some of the more famous ones. While focusing principally on the plays themselves as works of art, the course also explores their social, intellectual, and theatrical contexts, as well as the variety of critical response they have engendered.

Prerequisite: One English Foundations course and English 144 or 244

ENGL 328.00 Victorian Poetry 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58916

Susan Jaret McKinstry

Living in an era of rapid progress and profound doubt, Victorian poets are prolific, challenging, inventive, and insistent that poetry address contemporary questions of social inequity, science, gender, nation, self, race, and knowledge itself. Readings will include works by Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning, Oscar Wilde, Matthew Arnold, Dante Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll), Gerard Manley Hopkins, and others, as well as cultural images and documents.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one other 6 credit English course

ENGL 359.00 World Literature in the Twenty-First Century 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 58917

Kofi Owusu

Our focus will be on contemporary writers who tend to localize the global and/or globalize the local in their decidedly textured fiction and nonfiction published since 2001. Selected writers include Zinzi Clemmons, Ta-Nehisi Coates, J.M. Coetzee, Junot Diaz, Esi Edugyan, Nuruddin Farah, Yaa Gyasi, Dinaw Mengestu, Chigozie Obioma, and Zadie Smith.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one additional 6 credit English course or instructor permission

FREN 206.00 Contemporary French and Francophone Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59270

Sandra E Rousseau

Through texts, images and films coming from different continents, this class will present Francophone cultures and discuss the connections and tensions that have emerged between France and other French speaking countries. Focused on oral and written expression this class aims to strengthen students’ linguistic skills while introducing them to the academic discipline of French and Francophone studies. The theme will be school and education in the Francophone world.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 236.00 Francophone Cinema and the African Experience 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59274

Cherif Keïta

Born as a response to the colonial gaze (ethnographic films, in particular) and ideological discourse, African cinema has been a determined effort to capture and affirm an African personality and consciousness. Focusing on film production from Francophone Africa and its diaspora over the past few decades, this course will address themes such as slavery, colonialism, and national identity, as well as the immigrant experience in France and in Quebec. It will provide an introduction to African symbolisms, world-views, and narrative techniques.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 350.00 Middle East and French Connection 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59283

Sandra E Rousseau

PersepolisSyngue SabourLe rocher de Tanios—three prize-winning texts written in French by authors whose native tongue was not French but Arabic or Farsi. In this class we will direct our attention to the close—albeit problematic—relations between France and the Middle East (broadly considered) through an analysis of cultural and literary objects. What has this “French connection” meant for the Middle-Eastern and for French culture?

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

GERM 150.00 German Music and Culture from Mozart to Rammstein 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 57885

Juliane Schicker

In this course, we survey significant developments in German-language culture, broadly defined, from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century. Students of all disciplines and majors are invited to receive an overview of the music and culture of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, starting in the 1750s and tracing its impact into the present time. The course includes literature, film, music, language, history, habits, news, etc., and surveys major figures, movements, and their influence on the world’s civilization. The course encourages critical engagement with the material at hand and provides the opportunity to compare it with the students’ own cultural background. Taught in English.

In Translation

JAPN 247.00 Japanese Book Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59391

Kevin P Mulholland

What is a book?  The answer—from a nineteenth century Japanese perspective—may surprise you. This course looks at how the Japanese woodblock-printed book is the site of colliding worlds of creative, political, social, and technological challenges. The course materials will be both in translation and physical access to real historical examples. As a hands-on approach, the class will design and publish its own woodblock-printed book.  No Japanese language is required.

In translation

LATN 234.00 Julius Caesar: the Gallic and Civil Wars 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59389

Jake N Morton

Julius Caesar spent ten years campaigning in Gaul before being called back to Rome to face a splintered Republic and protracted Civil War. Caesar wrote fascinating accounts of both these wars, going beyond tactics to include ethnography, allegories of the Roman Republic in foreign societies, and analysis of why and how the civil war erupted and who was responsible. We will read significant portions of Caesar's Gallic War and Civil War, as well as writings about Caesar by contemporaneous authors. Caesar's elegant and clear prose belies a complex explanation and justification of the collapse of the Republic.

Prerequisite: Latin 204 or equivalent

LCST 245.00 The Critical Toolbox: Who's Afraid of Theory? 6 credits

Seth E Peabody

This class introduces students to the various theoretical frameworks and the many approaches scholars can use when analyzing a text (whether this text is a film, an image, a literary piece or a performance). What do words like ‘structuralism,’ ‘ecocriticism,’ 'cultural studies,' and ‘postcolonial studies’ refer to? Most importantly, how do they help us understand the world around us? This class will be organized around interdisciplinary theoretical readings and exercises in cultural analysis.

Prerequisite: At least one 200- or 300-level course in Literary/Artistic Analysis (in any language) or instructor permission

MUSC 126.00 America's Music 6 credits

Andy A Flory

A survey of American music with particular attention to the interaction of the folk, popular, and classical realms. No musical experience required.

MUSC 204.00 Theory II: Musical Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 57752

Justin M London

An investigation into the nature of musical sounds and the way they are combined to form rhythms, melodies, harmonies, and form. Topics include the nature of musical pitch, the structure of musical scales and their influence on melody, chords and their interval content, the complexity of rhythmic patterns, and chromatic harmony and modulation. Student work includes building a musical instrument, programming a drum machine, writing computer code to create harmonies and timbres, and an extended music analysis project.

Prerequisite: Music 103, or permission of the instructor as assessed by a diagnostic exam administered at the start of the term

MUSC 211.00 Western Music and its Social Ecosystems, 1600-1830 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 57747

Brooke H McCorkle

Western classical music, especially in the academy and the concert hall, enshrines the white racial frame. In this class we begin deconstructing that music’s white racial frame by interrogating how the classical canon came about, what it entails, and acknowledging how it is active in musical activities (called musicking) of the past and present. We will study the relationships between performers, listeners, and composers (social ecosystems) and consider the music and stories of those who have historically been excluded from the canon, including BIPOC, LGBTQIA+, and female artists. Through a variety of assignments including online posts, in-class discussions, and a final project that can take the form of a written paper or creative work, students will develop critical thinking, listening, and communication skills to help them succeed in their various musical endeavors. An ability to read music is not required, but students should be prepared to think deeply about sound and its meanings.

Prerequisite: Ability to read music preferred, but not required

MUSC 334.00 Marvin Gaye 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59668

Andy A Flory

This is a research-based course focused on the music and creative practices of Marvin Gaye, one of the most famous and successful popular vocalists of the 1960s and 1970s. We will begin with a furious survey of Gaye’s life and music, and move quickly into more critical readings. Along the way, students will develop individual research topics with the assistance of the instructor, and present findings to the group on a weekly basis. The seminar will culminate with individual student research presentations and a well-crafted research paper on a topic related to Gaye.

Prerequisite: The ability to read music and a previous music course, or instructor consent

RUSS 261.00 Lolita 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59710

Diane M Nemec Ignashev

Rejected by every major publisher, first released in France in 1955 by a press known for pornographic trash, Vladimir Nabokov's scandalous novel about a middle-aged immigrant college professor obsessed with a twelve-year-old girl continues to feed controversy as well as to challenge and delight readers with its labyrinthian narrative, endless wordplay, innumerable intertextual allusions, and troublesome eroticism. In addition to reading the novel, we will focus on critical approaches that address the cultural clash underlying the ostensible plot, changing reception, and reception of the novel outside the US. Thus warned, you are invited to join the jury in deliberating the designs and delights of this twentieth-century literary classic.

SPAN 205.01 Conversation and Composition 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59310

Humberto R Huergo

A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 242.00 Introduction to Latin American Literature 6 credits

Silvia Lopez

An introductory course to reading major texts in Spanish provides an historical survey of the literary movements within Latin American literature from the pre-Hispanic to the contemporary period. Recommended as a foundation course for further study. Not open to seniors.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency

Not open to seniors

SPAN 262.00 Myth and History in Central American Literature 6 credits

Yansi Y Perez

In this course we study the relationship between myth and history in Central America since its origins in the Popol Vuh, the sacred texts of the Mayans until the period of the post-civil wars era. The course is organized in a chronological manner. We will study, in addition to the Popol Vuh, the chronicles of Alvarado, some poems by Rubén Darío and Francisco Gavidia, some of the writings of Miguel Ãngel Asturias and Salarrué. The course will end with a study of critical visions of the mythical presented by more contemporary authors such as Roque Dalton and Luis de Lión. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 370.00 Indigeneity and Gender in Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58077

Walther Maradiegue

This course will examine representations of Indigenous peoples in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with special attention to constructions of race and gender. We will explore topics such as the racial and gendered associations used to construct indigeneity, the exclusion of alternative indigenous gender subjectivities, and the double subordination indigenous women have historically experienced. Some questions we will explore are: How has indigeneity been understood in nineteenth and twentieth-century Latin America? How have nineteenth-century Latin American nations imagined and disciplined female indigeneity? What new forms of indigenous gender identities became visible during the twentieth century? The course includes materials related to Central America (Mexico, Guatemala), the Andes, and the Amazon.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

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