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CCST 275.00 I'm A Stranger Here Myself 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59063

Éva S Pósfay

What do enculturation, tourism, culture shock, "going native," haptics, cross-cultural adjustment, and third culture kids have in common? How do intercultural transitions shape identity? What is intercultural competence? This course explores theories about intercultural contact and tests their usefulness by applying them to the analysis of world literature, case studies, and the visual arts, and by employing students' intercultural experiences as evidence. From individualized, self-reflective exercises to community-oriented group endeavors, our activities will promote new intercultural paradigms in the classroom and the wider community. Course designed for off-campus returnees, students who have lived abroad, or who have experienced being outsiders.

CGSC 130.00 What Minds Are What They Do: An Introduction to Cognitive Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59640

Jason A Decker

An interdisciplinary examination of issues concerning the mind and mental phenomena. The course will draw on work from diverse fields such as artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, and neuroscience. Topics to be discussed include: the mind-body problem, embodied cognition, perception, representation, reasoning, and learning.

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59110

Michael T Hemesath

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 161

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59356

Eduard Storm

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.03 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59385

Yaniv Ben-Ami

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59112

Faress F Bhuiyan

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59113

Mark T Kanazawa

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59114

Jenny Bourne

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 267.00 Behavioral Economics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59125

Jonathan M Lafky

This course introduces experimental economics and behavioral economics as two complementary approaches to understanding economic decision making. We will study the use of controlled experiments to test and critique economic theories, as well as how these theories can be improved by introducing psychologically plausible assumptions to our models. We will read a broad survey of experimental and behavioral results, including risk and time preferences, prospect theory, other-regarding preferences, the design of laboratory and field experiments, and biases in decision making.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 271.00 Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59126

Mark T Kanazawa

This course focuses on environmental economics, energy economics, and the relationship between them. Economic incentives for pollution abatement, the industrial organization of energy production, optimal depletion rates of energy sources, and the environmental and economic consequences of alternate energy sources are analyzed.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 274.00 Labor Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59127

Faress F Bhuiyan

Why do some people choose to work and others do not? Why are some people paid higher wages than others? What are the economic benefits of education for the individual and for society? How do government policies, such as subsidized child care, the Earned Income Tax Credit and the income tax influence whether people work and the number of hours they choose to work? These are some of the questions examined in labor economics. This course will focus on the labor supply and human capital decisions of individuals and households.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 277.00 History and Theory of Financial Crises 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59386

Eduard Storm

The course provides an historical perspective on financial bubbles and crashes and critically examines theories of financial crises. The course will look at the long history of financial crises to highlight recurring themes and to try to determine, among other things, what went wrong, what elements precede most crises, and which responses were effective.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 282.00 The Theory of Investment Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59387

Yaniv Ben-Ami

This course provides an introduction to the main financial instruments that are used to fund economic activity. We will explore how investment products function and learn how to price a few of them. Attention will be given to the choices investors make, and should make, when allocating portfolios. Topics include bond pricing, stock pricing, option pricing, the mortgage market, hedge funds, private equity, optimal portfolios, defaults, financial intermediary capital, and investors' behavioral biases.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 330.00 Intermediate Price Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59115

Jenny Bourne

An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111

ECON 331.00 Intermediate Macro Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59128

Nathan D Grawe

Analysis of the forces determining the general level of output, employment, and prices with special emphasis on the role of money and on interest rate determination. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275) or permission of the instructor and Economics 110 and 111

EDUC 110.00 Introduction to Educational Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58717

Jeff A Snyder

This course will focus on education as a multidisciplinary field of study. We will explore the meanings of education within individual lives and institutional contexts, learn to critically examine the assumptions that writers, psychologists, sociologists and philosophers bring to the study of education, and read texts from a variety of disciplines. What has "education" meant in the past? What does "education" mean in contemporary American society? What might "education" mean to people with differing circumstances and perspectives? And what should "education" mean in the future? Open only to first-and second-year students.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: EDUC 110.WL0 (Synonym 58718)

EDUC 338.00 Multicultural Education 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59629

Jeff A Snyder

This course focuses on the respect for human diversity, especially as these relate to various racial, cultural and economic groups, and to women. It includes lectures and discussions intended to aid students in relating to a wide variety of persons, cultures, and life styles.

Prerequisite: 100 or 200-level Educational Studies course or instructor permission

ENTS 120.52 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am1:45pm5:45pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59644

Tsegaye H Nega

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 120.WL2 (Synonym 59646)

ENTS 120.53 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 59645

Tsegaye H Nega

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 120.WL3 (Synonym 59647)

ENTS 310.00 Topics in Environmental Law and Policy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59643

Kimberly K Smith

This seminar will examine topical issues in domestic and international environmental law and policy. We will aim to understand how environmental laws work to achieve policy objectives, with attention also to debates about the role of markets and community-based environmental management. The specific topics may change from year to year, but may include approaches to sustainable development, sustainable agriculture, protection of endangered species, and conservation and management of water resources. This course has no prerequisites and is suitable for students of environmental studies, political science, international relations and political economy.

GWSS 110.00 Introduction to Gender, Women's & Sexuality Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57916

Iveta Jusova

This course is an introduction to the ways in which gender and sexuality structure our world, and to the ways feminists challenge established intellectual frameworks. However, since gender and sexuality are not homogeneous categories, but are crosscut by class, race, ethnicity, citizenship and culture, we also consider the ways differences in social location intersect with gender and sexuality.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GWSS 110.WL0 (Synonym 59357)

GWSS 200.00 Gender, Sexuality & the Pursuit of Knowledge 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 57920

Meera Sehgal

In this course we will examine whether there are feminist and/or queer ways of knowing, the criteria by which knowledge is classified as feminist and the various methods used by feminist and queer scholars to produce this knowledge. Some questions that will occupy us are: How do we know what we know? Who does research? Does it matter who the researcher is? How does the social location (race, class, gender, sexuality) of the researcher affect research? Who is the research for? What is the relationship between knowledge, power and social justice? While answering these questions, we will consider how different feminist and queer studies researchers have dealt with them.

MUSC 246.00 Music in Racism and Antiracism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59722

Deborah Appleman, Ronald Rodman, Melinda Russell

Music has a long, ugly history as a tool for the transmission of racism, and a vital one as a weapon against it. We will survey important instantiations at the intersections of music and racism in blackface minstrelsy, western classical music, Dalit music, Albinism, the U.S. national anthem, white nationalism, and the anti-apartheid movement, among others. Centering racism and antiracism, we will investigate the careers and musical output of five musicians: Paul Robeson, Pete Seeger, Hazel Scott, Charity Bailey, and Janelle Monae. Students will complete an original guided research project on a topic of their choice. No musical experience required.

PE 350.00 Methods: Principles and Philosophy of Coaching 3 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 3, Waitlist: 0

West Gym 213

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57557

Aaron D Rushing

This course emphasizes the methods of teaching skills, structure, and strategies of team oriented sports. Emphasis is placed on understanding the coaching profession at different levels, developing coaching skills and creating a philosophy of coaching.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58830

Kent Freeze

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 58831)

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Krissy K Lunz Trujillo

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58834

Tun Myint

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 202.00 Tools of National Power: Statecraft and Diplomatic Power 3 credits

Thomas R Hanson

In this section of three related five-week courses, we will study the role of diplomacy as a component of U.S. statecraft.  An active and informed diplomacy can help achieve international cooperation in the face of shared global threats, while helping to forestall conflict and forwarding U.S. national interests. Yet in recent decades, diplomacy has often been overshadowed by military intervention and economic sanctions as a tool of power. We will discuss the history of diplomacy, including the specific traditions of U.S. diplomatic practice. Using case studies taken from current issues, we will assess how diplomacy functions in practice and reflect on the future role of diplomats in a world of dramatic change. Course modalities will include focused readings, active class discussion, and short papers.

1st five week

POSC 209.00 Money and Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 58846

Melanie Freeze

Modern elections have become multibillion-dollar ventures. How does money influence electoral and policy outcomes in the United States? Who donates and why do people or groups donate? Where does all the money go? How has campaign finance been regulated and what are proposed reforms? Focusing on recent elections, we will explore these questions by delving into the world of campaign finance.

POSC 212.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Kimberly K Smith

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

POSC 229.00 The U.S. Congress: Coordination and Conflict 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57852

Melanie Freeze

How does Congress make public policy? What factors inhibit or enhance legislative productivity? Is the policymaking process too partisan? This course provides a comprehensive introduction to congressional organization and procedures, the policy process, and the core debates and theories surrounding legislative politics in the United States Congress. The path of policy within Congress is an incredibly complex and conflict-ridden coordination problem. As a class, we will explore how the underlying motivations to win office, produce policy, and gain prestige drive congressional member behaviors. We will also carefully consider the institutional details of the House and Senate that constrain these legislative actors and influence legislative outcomes. 

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58835

Eric S Mosinger

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275) or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5)

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58849

Greg G Marfleet

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 284.00 War and Peace in Northern Ireland 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58851

Dev Gupta

This class examines the decades-long conflict in Northern Ireland between Catholics and Protestants known as "The Troubles." We will investigate the causes of violence in this region and explore the different phases of the conflict, including initial mobilization of peaceful protestors, radicalization into violent resistance, and de-escalation. We will also consider the international dimensions of the conflict and how groups forged transnational ties with diaspora groups and separatist movements around the world. Finally, we will explore the consequences of this conflict on present-day Northern Ireland's politics and identify lessons from the peace process for other societies in conflict.

POSC 306.00 The Psychology of Identity Politics and Group Behavior 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59635

Krissy K Lunz Trujillo

In recent years we have heard a lot about “identity politics.” This course aims to answer the question, why do people form group-based identities and how do they impact mass political attitudes and behavior? Using examples from American politics, we will examine the psychological underpinnings of identity and group-based affiliations as well as their political consequences. In doing so, we will explore how bias, prejudice, and social hierarchy are formed, maintained, and changed. Such evaluations will be based on discussions of various dominant and minority group identities including partisanship, race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, religion, and place. 

POSC 328.00 Foreign Policy Analysis* 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm9:30pm7:00pm9:30pm
Synonym: 58853

Greg G Marfleet

Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended.

POSC 355.00 Identity, Culture and Rights* 6 credits

Barbara Allen

This course will look at the contemporary debate in multiculturalism in the context of a variety of liberal philosophical traditions, including contractarians, libertarians, and Utilitarians. These views of the relationship of individual to community will be compared to those of the communitarian and egalitarian traditions. Research papers may use a number of feminist theory frameworks and methods.

PSYC 110.01 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58333

Emily A Hazlett

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 110.02 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58349

Mija M Van Der Wege

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 263.00 Sleep and Dreaming 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 236

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59676

Lawrence J Wichlinski

This course will examine recent experimental findings and current perspectives on sleep, dreaming, sleep disorders, and states of consciousness.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 384.00 Psychology of Prejudice 6 credits

Sharon A Akimoto

This seminar introduces students to major psychological theories and research on the development, perpetuation and reduction of prejudice. A social and historical approach to race, culture, ethnicity and race relations will provide a backdrop for examining psychological theory and research on prejudice formation and reduction. Major areas to be discussed are cognitive social learning, group conflict and contact hypothesis.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. Psychology 256 or 258 recommended

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59030

Ahmed S Ibrahim

An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 59031)

SOAN 111.00 Introduction to Sociology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59008

Wes D Markofski

Sociology is an intellectual discipline, spanning the gap between the sciences and humanities while often (though not always) involving itself in public policy debates, social reform, and political activism. Sociologists study a startling variety of topics using qualitative and quantitative methods. Still, amidst all this diversity, sociology is centered on a set of core historical theorists (Marx/Weber/Durkheim) and research topics (race/class/gender inequality). We will explore these theoretical and empirical foundations by reading and discussing influential texts and select topics in the study of social inequality while relating them to our own experiences and understanding of the social world. 

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 111.WL0 (Synonym 59009)

SOAN 208.00 Gentrification 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59596

Colin McLaughlin-Alcock

Gentrification, a process of neighborhood-level class displacement, whereby devalued urban areas are redeveloped into trendy hubs, is one of the predominant modes of urban change in the twenty-first century. In this class, we will first develop a general understanding of how gentrification works. Then we will direct ethnographic attention to explore how gentrification takes place in specific contexts around the globe. We will examine how social boundaries, power relationships, and identities are reorganized through gentrification; how class and racial disparity are produced and enforced; how the social meaning of place impacts neighborhood change; and how communities have resisted gentrification.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 226.00 Anthropology of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59034

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

We all lead gendered lives, in our felt identities as well as through how we are perceived, advantaged, and disadvantaged by others. This course examines gender and gender relations from an anthropological perspective, centering and contextualizing the global human diversity of gendered experiences. Key concepts such as gender, voice/mutedness, status, public and private spheres, and the gendered division of labor—and their intellectual history—let us explore intriguing questions such as how many genders there are, and whether gender is mutable. The course focuses on two areas: 1) the role of sex, sexuality, and procreation in creating cultural notions of gender, and 2) the impacts of colonialism, globalization, and economic underdevelopment on gender relations.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above.

SOAN 228.00 Public Sociology of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59017

Wes D Markofski

From the discipline’s earliest days, sociologists have considered religion a fascinating and perplexing object of study. Classical sociologists devoted enormous attention to the topic of religion, famously linking it to the development of capitalism and Western modernity (Weber), to social solidarity and symbolic classification systems (Durkheim), to political passivity and social conservatism (Marx), and to the varying forms of social, economic, and political life found in the world’s great civilizations. This course focuses on special topics in the contemporary sociology of religion, with a particular emphasis on religion in public and political life in American and global civil society.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses number 200 or above

SOAN 233.00 Anthropology of Food 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59018

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Food is the way to a person's heart but perhaps even more interesting, the window into a society's soul. Simply speaking understating a society's foodways is the best way to comprehend the complexity between people, culture and nature. This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior, from food procurement and consumption practices to the politics of nutrition and diets. In doing so we hope to elucidate how food is more than mere sustenance and that often the act of eating is a manifestation of power, resistance, identity, and community. Class fees apply.

Sophomore Priority, Class Fees Apply

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 233.WL0 (Synonym 59695)

SOAN 314.00 Contemporary Issues in Critical Criminology 6 credits

Annette M Nierobisz

In this course we examine contemporary criminological issues from the critical perspectives offered by sociologists. Topics under examination include: how crime is conventionally defined, measured, and theorized; societal reactions to crime; and punishment of those who are deemed criminal. While exploring these topics, we will consider the impact of race, gender, and social class in shaping individuals’ interactions with the U.S. criminal justice system. Students will also seek a cross-national comparative understanding. Course readings primarily consist of theoretical and ethnographic accounts supplemented with statistical summaries.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 325.00 Sociology of Adoption and Assisted Reproduction 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59020

Liz Y Raleigh

Where do babies come from? Whereas once the answer was relatively straight forward, the growth of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and adoption has changed the field of potential answers. Nowadays babies can come from birthmothers, egg donors, and surrogates. In this course we will examine the meaning and making of families across these different types of formations and contextualize the popularity of ART relative to the decrease in adoption. We will take a sociological approach to analyzing these issues, paying particular attention to questions surrounding women's rights, baby "markets," and the racialization of children placed for adoption in the U.S.

Prerequisite: Prior Sociology/Anthropology course or instructor permission

SOAN 331.00 Anthropological Thought and Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59010

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

A systematic introduction to the theoretical foundations of social and cultural anthropology with special emphasis given to twentieth century British, French and American schools. The course deals with such seminal figures as Morgan, Boas, Malinowski, Radcliffe-Brown, Levi-Straus, Harris, Sahlins, Bourdieu, Geertz, and Appadurai. The reading strikes a balance between ethnographic accounts and theoretical statements.

Prerequisite: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 or instructor permission

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