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AFST 230.00 Black Diaspora, Politics of Place 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 57853

Ahmed S Ibrahim

Central to diasporic identity formation and imagination is the simultaneous belonging to a multiplicity of places. For black diasporic subjects, struggles against oppression and for new political futures inspire transgression against normative political boundaries. This class explores the role of place and politics in the making of the black diaspora in Europe and the Americas. It emphasizes the intellectual and political connections and the sense of shared identity and destiny. Through an interdisciplinary approach, this course will offer a global history of race, identity, and politics through the lens of the black diaspora.

AFST 398.00 Africana Studies Capstone 3 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 1, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58770

Thabiti C Willis

This course gives Africana Studies majors and minors the opportunity to apply what they have learned by preparing for and presenting at the annual National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) conference. Under the guidance of Africana Studies faculty members, students will interrogate the origins and institutionalization of Africana Studies; revise an Africana Studies-themed research paper completed in a previous course into a conference paper; and prepare and submit a paper proposal for NCBS. At NCBS, students will present their own research and engage with the work of Africana Studies scholars at panels, plenaries and workshops. Afterward, they will write a short assessment of the conference and their experience in Africana Studies at Carleton. 

AMST 244.00 Approaches to Indigenous Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59069

Meredith L McCoy

Indigenous Studies is both a body of content knowledge and a research methodology. This course provides an overview of the history of exploitative research dynamics between universities and Indigenous peoples while exposing students to alternative methodologies that center Indigenous perspectives and research priorities. Students will discuss what it means to be an ethical research partner as they learn about decolonizing and Indigenous research strategies. This course brings together ideas from History, Anthropology, Law, Public Health, Education, Literature, Art, and Social Work to evaluate studies relating to Indigenous peoples for their methods, contributions, and ethics.

AMST 345.00 Theory and Practice of American Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59076

Meredith L McCoy

Introduction to some of the animating debates within American Studies from the 1930s to the present. We will study select themes, theories, and methodologies in the writings of a number of scholars and try to understand 1) the often highly contested nature of debates about how best to study American culture; and 2) how various theories and forms of analysis in American Studies have evolved and transformed themselves over the last seventy years. Not designed to be a fine-grained institutional history of American Studies, but a vigorous exploration of some of the central questions of interpretation in the field. Normally taken by majors in their junior year.

Prerequisite: American Studies 115, 287 or instructor permission

AMST 399.00 Senior Seminar in American Studies 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59407

Adriana Estill

This seminar focuses on advanced skills in American Studies research, critical reading, writing, and presentation. Engagement with one scholarly talk, keyed to the current year's comps exam theme, will be part of the course. Through a combination of class discussion, small group work and presentations, and one-on-one interactions with the professor, majors learn the process of crafting and supporting independent interdisciplinary arguments, no matter which option for comps they are pursuing. Students also will learn effective strategies for peer review and oral presentation.

Prerequisite: American Studies 345

ARBC 102.01 Elementary Arabic 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59196

Sahar H Ramadan

This course sequence introduces non-Arabic speakers to the sounds, script, and basic grammar of Arabic--the language of 200 million speakers in the Arab world and the liturgical language of over a billion Muslims. Students will develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Modern Standard Arabic. Classes will incorporate readings and audio-visual material from contemporary Arabic media, as well as popular music.

Prerequisite: Arabic 101 or equivalent

ARBC 205.01 Intermediate Arabic 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59198

Yaron Klein

In this course sequence students will continue to develop their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills, while building a solid foundation of Arabic grammar (morphology and syntax). Students will develop their ability to express ideas in Modern Standard Arabic by writing essays and preparing oral presentations. Classes will incorporate readings and audio-visual material from contemporary Arabic media, as well as popular music.

Prerequisite: Arabic 204 or equivalent

ARBC 205.02 Intermediate Arabic 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59199

Zaki A Haidar

In this course sequence students will continue to develop their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills, while building a solid foundation of Arabic grammar (morphology and syntax). Students will develop their ability to express ideas in Modern Standard Arabic by writing essays and preparing oral presentations. Classes will incorporate readings and audio-visual material from contemporary Arabic media, as well as popular music.

Prerequisite: Arabic 204 or equivalent

ARBC 310.00 Advanced Media Arabic 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59200

Zaki A Haidar

Readings of excerpts from the Arabic press and listening to news editions, commentaries and other radio and TV programs from across the Arab world. Emphasis is on vocabulary expansion, text comprehension strategies, and further development of reading and listening comprehension. Class includes oral discussions and regular written assignments in Arabic.

Prerequisite: Arabic 206 or equivalent

ARTH 102.00 Introduction to Art History II 6 credits

Open: Size: 60, Registered: 50, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 57983

Ross K Elfline, Jessica F Keating

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from the fifteenth century through the present. The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, humanist and Reformation redefinitions of art in the Italian and Northern Renaissance, realism, modernity and tradition, the tension between self-expression and the art market, and the use of art for political purposes.

ARTH 298.00 Seminar for Art History Majors 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57978

Jessica F Keating

An intensive study of the nature of art history as an intellectual discipline and of the approaches scholars have taken to various art historical problems. Attention as well to principles of current art historical research and writing. Recommended for juniors who have declared art history as a major.

ASTR 110.00 Introduction to Astronomy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 48, Registered: 48, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58207

Valerie K Fox

An introduction to current astronomy with an emphasis on how we know what we know. Topics include the solar system; the life cycles of stars; pulsars, quasars, and black holes; and the history and future fate of the universe. No mathematics background beyond high school algebra and trigonometry is assumed.

BIOL 125.52 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am2:00pm6:00pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58428

Stephan G Zweifel, Mark McKone, Annie L Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL2 (Synonym 58433)

BIOL 125.53 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
2:30pm6:30pm
Synonym: 58429

Stephan G Zweifel, Mark McKone, Sarah Deel

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL3 (Synonym 58434)

BIOL 125.54 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am2:00pm6:00pm9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58430

Stephan G Zweifel, Mark McKone, Annie L Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL4 (Synonym 58435)

BIOL 125.57 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am8:00am12:00pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58431

Stephan G Zweifel, Mark McKone, Sarah Deel

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL7 (Synonym 58436)

BIOL 126.52 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am1:45pm5:45pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58438

Mike T Nishizaki, Rika E Anderson, David Hougen-Eitzman

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL2 (Synonym 58441)

BIOL 126.54 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am1:45pm5:45pm9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58440

Rika E Anderson, Mike T Nishizaki, David Hougen-Eitzman

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

BIOL 126.59 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am8:00am12:00pm9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58439

Rika E Anderson, Mike T Nishizaki

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL9 (Synonym 58442)

BIOL 210.00 Global Change Biology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 48, Registered: 49, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58444

John L Berini

Environmental problems are caused by a complex mix of physical, biological, social, economic, political, and technological factors. This course explores how these environmental problems affect life on Earth by examining the biological processes underlying natural ecological systems and the effects of global environmental changes such as resources consumption and overharvesting, land-use change, climate warming, pollution, extinction and biodiversity loss, and invasive species.

Prerequisite: One introductory science lab course (Biology 125, 126, Chemistry 123, 128, Geology 110, 115 or 120)

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 210.WL0 (Synonym 58445)

BIOL 234.00 Microbiology with Laboratory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 58446

Raka M Mitra

A study of the metabolism, genetics, structure, and function of microorganisms. While presented in the framework of the concepts of cellular and molecular biology, the emphasis will be on the uniqueness and diversity of the microbial world. The course integrates lecture and laboratory, and will fulfill requirements of a microbiology course with lab for veterinary or pharmacy schools.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126; Concurrent registration in Biology 235

Requires concurrent registration in BIOL 235

BIOL 235.00 Microbiology Laboratory 2 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm
Synonym: 58448

Raka M Mitra

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126; Concurrent registration in Biology 234

BIOL 234 required

BIOL 240.00 Genetics 6 credits

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58449

Emily K Ho

A study of the transmission of genetic information between generations of organisms, and of the mechanism of expression of information within an individual organism. The main emphasis will be on the physical and chemical basis of heredity; mutational, transmissional and functional analysis of the genetic material, and gene expression.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 or instructor permission

BIOL 244.00 Biostatistics 3 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 58484

Mark McKone

An introduction to statistical techniques commonly used in Biology. The course will use examples from primary literature to examine the different ways that biological data are organized and analyzed. Emphasis will be placed on how to choose the appropriate statistical techniques in different circumstances and how to use statistical software to carry out tests. Topics covered include variable types (categorical, parametric, and non-parametric), analysis of variance, generalized linear models, and meta-analysis. There will be an opportunity for students to analyze data from their own research experiences.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and one Biology 200 or 300 level course

BIOL 310.00 Immunology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58485

Debby R Walser-Kuntz

This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity. Topics to be covered include the structure and function of antibodies, cytokines, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in antigen presentation, cellular immunity, immunodeficiencies, and current techniques used to study immune responses.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and either Biology 240 or 280

BIOL 332.00 Human Physiology 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 42, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58486

Fernan F Jaramillo

Human Physiology seeks to understand the fundamental mechanisms responsible for the diverse functions of the body. Course topics include the function and regulation of the various physiological systems (nervous, circulatory, endocrine, excretory, respiratory, digestive, etc.), biochemistry, cellular physiology, homeostasis and acid-base chemistry. The study of human physiology provides the principal groundwork for internal medicine, pharmacology, and other related health fields. The laboratory includes a variety of experiments focusing on the function and regulation of the human body.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126; Concurrent registration in Biology 333

BIOL 333 required. Students should waitlist for BOTH 333 (lab) and 332 (lecture) to be considered for enrollment from either waitlist.

BIOL 333.01 Human Physiology Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58487

Fernan F Jaramillo

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Biology 332; Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 332 required. Students should waitlist for BOTH 333 (lab) and 332 (lecture) to be considered for enrollment from either waitlist.

BIOL 333.02 Human Physiology Laboratory 2 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:00am12:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58488

Fernan F Jaramillo

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Biology 332; Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 332 required. Students should waitlist for BOTH 333 (lab) and 332 (lecture) to be considered for enrollment from either waitlist.

BIOL 368.00 Seminar: Developmental Neurobiology 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58489

Eric D Hoopfer

An examination of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying development of the nervous system. We will survey recent studies of a variety of model organisms to explore key steps in neuronal development including neural induction, patterning, specification of neuronal identity, axonal guidance, synapse formation, cell death and regeneration.

Prerequisite: Biology 240 or Biology 280

BIOL 399.00 Critical Reading and Analysis of Primary Literature 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 1, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 58451

Stephan G Zweifel

Guided instruction in reading and interpretation of contemporary primary literature in Biology.

Prerequisite: Biology 125, 126 and 3-upper-level Biology courses; concurrent registration in Biology 400

BIOL 400 required.

CAMS 101.00 Making Media 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59688

Paul Hager

This class introduces students to the process of making moving-image media. How do we generate creative ideas? How do we translate those ideas into moving images and sound? Students will draw inspiration from a variety of sources that are personal, cultural, and observational, and in doing so, develop confidence in their own artistic practice and perspective. Production exercises using consumer tools (smartphones, basic editing software) will introduce students to strategies for ideation and development for narrative, documentary, and experimental approaches to media production. Those planning to enroll in 200-level CAMS production courses will need to take CAMS 111 as a prerequisite. Students who have taken CAMS 111 cannot take CAMS 101.

CAMS 110.00 Introduction to Cinema and Media Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59664

Carol Donelan

This course introduces students to the basic terms, concepts and methods used in cinema studies and helps build critical skills for analyzing films, technologies, industries, styles and genres, narrative strategies and ideologies. Students will develop skills in critical viewing and careful writing via assignments such as a short response essay, a plot segmentation, a shot breakdown, and various narrative and stylistic analysis papers. Classroom discussion focuses on applying critical concepts to a wide range of films. Requirements include two evening film screenings per week. Extra time.

Sophomore Priority. Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 110.WL0 (Synonym 59665)

CAMS 111.01 Digital Foundations 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58123

Laska Jimsen

This class introduces students to the full range of production tools and forms, building both the technical and conceptual skills needed to continue at more advanced levels. We will explore the aesthetics and mechanics of shooting digital video, the role of sound and how to record and mix it, field and studio production, lighting, and editing with Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Course work will include individual and group production projects, readings, and writing. This is an essential foundation for anyone interested in moving-image production and learning the specifics of CAMS' studios, cameras, and lighting equipment.

Sophomore Priority. Extra Time required.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 111.WL1 (Synonym 58125)

CAMS 111.02 Digital Foundations 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58124

Laska Jimsen

This class introduces students to the full range of production tools and forms, building both the technical and conceptual skills needed to continue at more advanced levels. We will explore the aesthetics and mechanics of shooting digital video, the role of sound and how to record and mix it, field and studio production, lighting, and editing with Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Course work will include individual and group production projects, readings, and writing. This is an essential foundation for anyone interested in moving-image production and learning the specifics of CAMS' studios, cameras, and lighting equipment.

Sophomore Priority. Extra Time required.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 111.WL2 (Synonym 58126)

CAMS 187.00 Cult Television and Fan Cultures 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm
Synonym: 58136

Candace I Moore

This course focuses on the history, production, and consumption of cult television. The beginning of the seminar will be focused on critically examining a number of theoretical approaches to the study of genre and fandom. Building on these approaches, the remainder of the course will focus on cult television case studies from the last eight decades. We will draw on recent scholarship to explore how cult television functions textually, industrially, and culturally. Additionally, we will study fan communities on the Internet and consider how fansites, webisodes, and sites like YouTube and Netflix transform television genres.

Extra Time Required, evening screenings

CAMS 214.00 Film History III 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58128

Jay S Beck

This course is designed to introduce students to recent film history, 1970-present, and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. The course charts the development of national cinemas since the 1970s while considering the effects of media consolidation and digital convergence. Moreover, the course examines how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form in the twenty-first century.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CAMS 246.00 Documentary Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 58143

Cecilia M Cornejo

This course explores the relevance and influence of documentary films by closely examining the aesthetic concerns and ethical implications inherent in these productions. We study these works both as artistic undertakings and as documents produced within a specific time, culture, and ideology. Central to our understanding of the form are issues of technology, methodology, and ethics, which are examined thematically as well as chronologically. The course offers an overview of the major historical movements in documentary film along more recent works; it combines screenings, readings, and discussions with the goal of preparing students to both understand and analyze documentary films.

Extra Time Required, evening screenings

CAMS 264.00 Story Development Workshop 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59663

Catherine Licata

This course explores the creative practice of developing stories for narrative films. Students will draw inspiration from a variety of sources that are personal, cultural, or observational, and in doing so, develop confidence in their own artistic practice and perspective. We will learn the fundamentals of dramatic tools, use these tools to make screen ideas evolve, consider audience reception, and practice giving and receiving constructive critique. By the end of term, students will have generated ideas for future production projects that reflect their thematic concerns, and have a fully developed outline for a project that may be realized in an upper level production course.

Prerequisite: Cinema and Media Studies 111

CAMS 371.00 Advanced Production Workshop II 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58129

Catherine Licata

Advanced Production Workshop II is taken in conjunction with CAMS 400 for students completing production comps. Production projects are inherently collaborative; this course supports collaboration through workshops, crewing, and informed critique. This course is the second in the advanced production workshop sequence with a focus on production and post-production. Please contact instructor for further information.

Prerequisite: Cinema and Media Studies 370 or instructor consent

Project Proposal required, Extra Time Required

CCST 208.00 International Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm
Synonym: 59062

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Have you just returned from Asia, Africa, Europe, or South America? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with the culture (and, when appropriate, the language) you left behind. Relying on magazines and newspapers around the world, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. You may choose to read the press in the local language, or read English-language media about your region, meeting once each week for conversational exchange. (Language of conversation is English.)

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CCST 275.00 I'm A Stranger Here Myself 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59063

Éva S Pósfay

What do enculturation, tourism, culture shock, "going native," haptics, cross-cultural adjustment, and third culture kids have in common? How do intercultural transitions shape identity? What is intercultural competence? This course explores theories about intercultural contact and tests their usefulness by applying them to the analysis of world literature, case studies, and the visual arts, and by employing students' intercultural experiences as evidence. From individualized, self-reflective exercises to community-oriented group endeavors, our activities will promote new intercultural paradigms in the classroom and the wider community. Course designed for off-campus returnees, students who have lived abroad, or who have experienced being outsiders.

CCST 398.00 The Cross-Cultural Panorama: A Capstone Workshop 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:15pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59064

Scott D Carpenter

The work of Cross-Cultural Studies traverses many disciplines, often engaging with experiences that are difficult to capture in traditional formats. In this course students will create an ePortfolio that reflects, deepens, and narrates the various forms of cross-cultural experience they have had at Carleton, drawing on coursework and off-campus study, as well as such extra-curricular activities as talks, service learning, internships and fellowships. Guided by readings and prompts, students will write a reflective essay articulating the coherence of the parts, describing both the process and the results of their pathway through the minor. Considered a capstone for CCST, but for anyone looking to thread together their experiences across culture. Course is taught as a workshop. 

CGSC 233.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58303

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with PSYC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Cognitive Science 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or permission of the instructor

CGSC 232 required. Cross listed with PSYC 233.

CGSC 233.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58304

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with PSYC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Cognitive Science 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or permission of the instructor

CGSC 232 required. Cross listed with PSYC 233.

CHEM 123.53 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 59687

Julia G Bakker-Arkema

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 123.54 Principles of Chemistry I With Problem Solving and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am9:50am10:50am
1:45pm5:45pm
Synonym: 58159

Daniela L Kohen

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128. This section of Chemistry with problem solving is periodically offered for students who wish to further develop their general analytical and critical thinking skills. This smaller section will have additional class meetings for problem solving and review. Chemistry 123 with problem solving is appropriate for students who would like to have more scheduled time to work with a faculty member on developing their scientific reasoning skills and understanding of the foundations of chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 123.59 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am8:00am12:00pm9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58195

Julia G Bakker-Arkema

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 224.52 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am1:45pm5:45pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58196

Joe Chihade

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 224.57 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58197

Joe Chihade

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 233.53 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
2:30pm6:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59741

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.54 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 21, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm5:45pm1:50pm2:50pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58160

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.59 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 21, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm8:00am12:00pm1:50pm2:50pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58161

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 234.52 Organic Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 21, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm1:45pm5:45pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58162

Chris T Calderone

The chemistry of functional groups is continued from Chemistry 233, and is extended to the multifunctional compounds found in nature, in particular carbohydrates and proteins. The laboratory focuses upon inquiry-based projects and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233

CHEM 234.57 Organic Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm8:00am12:00pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58163

Chris T Calderone

The chemistry of functional groups is continued from Chemistry 233, and is extended to the multifunctional compounds found in nature, in particular carbohydrates and proteins. The laboratory focuses upon inquiry-based projects and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233

CHEM 289.00 Climate & Health: From Science to Practice in Ethiopia 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 56103

Deborah S Gross, Tsegaye H Nega

This course is the second part of a two-term course sequence beginning with ENTS 289. This course will start with a multi-week trip to Ethiopia. While there, we will carry out a research program to assess the impact of cooking technologies on air quality in peoples’ homes, investigate the connections between regional and national environmental impacts and individual choices, and meet with national and international organizations working on these issues. We will work in both urban Addis Ababa and a rural area, Wolkite, to explore both types of settings. Back on campus during winter term, we will reflect on our experiences, analyze data, prepare and make public presentations, and propose appropriate follow-up projects.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in ENTS 289 the term before

Ethiopia Winter Break Program

CHEM 302.01 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58164

Will Hollingsworth, Trish A Ferrett

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 302.02 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58165

Will Hollingsworth, Trish A Ferrett

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 302.03 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58166

Trish A Ferrett, Will Hollingsworth

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 302.04 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm5:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58167

Trish A Ferrett, Will Hollingsworth

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 344.00 Quantum Chemistry 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58170

Trish A Ferrett

This course introduces quantum mechanics with an emphasis on chemical and spectroscopic applications. The focus will be on atomic and molecular quantum behavior involving electrons, rotations, and vibrations. The objective is to develop both a deeper understanding of bonding as well as an appreciation of how spectroscopy provides insight into the microscopic world of molecules.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128, Mathematics 120 or 211 and six credits from Physics 131 to 165

CHIN 102.01 Elementary Chinese 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:15am9:20am8:30am9:40am8:15am9:20am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59211

Faye Merritt

Continuation of Chinese 101.

Prerequisite: Chinese 101 or equivalent

CHIN 205.01 Intermediate Chinese 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:05am12:10pm11:30am12:40pm11:05am12:10pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59212

Shaohua Guo, Lin Deng

Continuation of Chinese 204. Completion of this course with a C- or better fulfills the language requirement.

Prerequisite: Chinese 204, Chinese 280 or placement

CHIN 205.02 Intermediate Chinese 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm2:50pm1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm2:50pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59213

Shaohua Guo, Lin Deng

Continuation of Chinese 204. Completion of this course with a C- or better fulfills the language requirement.

Prerequisite: Chinese 204, Chinese 280 or placement

CHIN 239.00 Digital China: Media, Culture, and Society 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 57835

Shaohua Guo

This course invites students to critically examine digital media technologies in relation to social change, cultural innovation, and popular entertainment. Drawing on literature from media, literary, and cultural studies, the course engages in topics such as new media institutions, Internet businesses, global activism, gender and sexuality, and mobile applications. Special attention is paid to the implications that digital media bring forth within particular social and historical contexts, as well as the ways in which the Internet serves as the site for the negotiation of various political, economic, and cultural forces. In translation.

In translation

CHIN 349.00 Tasting China: Regional Geography and Food Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57964

Lin Deng

This course creates a virtual journey that enriches students’ knowledge and understanding of Chinese food culture in geographical context through a range of textual and non-textual materials including essays by renowned writers and food critics, illustrated book chapters and magazine articles and reports, and acclaimed documentary films and videos. The course will familiarize students with culturally authentic and stylistically appropriate vocabulary and structures commonly found in cultural narratives, increase their ability to converse with extended discourse in topics relating to food culture, and enhance their comprehension and writing skills of literary and written Chinese.

Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or equivalent.

CLAS 123.00 Greek Archaeology and Art 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 35, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59188

Alex R Knodell

This course explores the archaeology and art of the Ancient Greek world. Beginning with prehistory, we will track the development of the material culture of Ancient Greece through the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and conclude by discussing aspects of the Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman empires that followed. We will focus throughout on aspects of archaeological practice, material culture and text, art and society, long-term social change, and the role of the past in the present.

CS 111.01 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58540

Layla K Oesper

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL1 (Synonym 58543)

CS 111.02 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58541

Sneha Narayan

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL2 (Synonym 58544)

CS 111.03 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:10pm7:00pm8:10pm7:00pm8:00pm
Synonym: 58542

David R Musicant

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

CS 111.04 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59563

James O Ryan

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

CS 201.01 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58545

Anya E Vostinar

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 201.WL1 (Synonym 58547)

CS 201.02 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58546

Aaron W Bauer

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

CS 202.00 Mathematics of Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58563

Eric C Alexander

This course introduces some of the formal tools of computer science, using a variety of applications as a vehicle. You'll learn how to encode data so that when you scratch the back of a DVD, it still plays just fine; how to distribute "shares" of your floor's PIN so that any five of you can withdraw money from the floor bank account (but no four of you can); how to play chess; and more. Topics that we'll explore along the way include: logic and proofs, number theory, elementary complexity theory and recurrence relations, basic probability, counting techniques, and graphs.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 and Mathematics 111 or instructor permission

CS 251.00 Programming Languages: Design and Implementation 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58564

Anna N Rafferty

What makes a programming language like "Python" or like "Java"? This course will look past superficial properties (like indentation) and into the soul of programming languages. We will explore a variety of topics in programming language construction and design: syntax and semantics, mechanisms for parameter passing, typing, scoping, and control structures. Students will expand their programming experience to include other programming paradigms, including functional languages like Scheme and ML.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 or instructor permission

CS 252.00 Algorithms 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58548

Layla K Oesper

A course on techniques used in the design and analysis of efficient algorithms. We will cover several major algorithmic design paradigms (greedy algorithms, dynamic programming, divide and conquer, and network flow). Along the way, we will explore the application of these techniques to a variety of domains (natural language processing, economics, computational biology, and data mining, for example). As time permits, we will include supplementary topics like randomized algorithms, advanced data structures, and amortized analysis.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 and Computer Science 202 (Mathematics 236 will be accepted in lieu of Computer Science 202)

CS 254.00 Computability and Complexity 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58549

James O Ryan

An introduction to the theory of computation. What problems can and cannot be solved efficiently by computers? What problems cannot be solved by computers, period? Topics include formal models of computation, including finite-state automata, pushdown automata, and Turing machines; formal languages, including regular expressions and context-free grammars; computability and uncomputability; and computational complexity, particularly NP-completeness.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 and Computer Science 202 (Mathematics 236 will be accepted in lieu of Computer Science 202)

CS 257.00 Software Design 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58550

Jeffrey R Ondich

It's easy to write a mediocre computer program, and lots of people do it. Good programs are quite a bit harder to write, and are correspondingly less common. In this course, we will study techniques, tools, and habits that will improve your chances of writing good software. While working on several medium-sized programming projects, we will investigate code construction techniques, debugging and profiling tools, testing methodologies, UML, principles of object-oriented design, design patterns, and user interface design.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 or instructor permission

CS 311.00 Computer Graphics 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59560

Josh R Davis

Scientific simulations, movies, and video games often incorporate computer-generated images of fictitious worlds. How are these worlds represented inside a computer? How are they “photographed” to produce the images that we see? What performance constraints and design trade-offs come into play? In this course we learn the basic theory and methodology of three-dimensional computer graphics, including both triangle rasterization and ray tracing. Familiarity with vectors, matrices, and the C programming language is recommended but not required.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

CS 314.00 Data Visualization 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58565

Eric C Alexander

Understanding the wealth of data that surrounds us can be challenging. Luckily, we have evolved incredible tools for finding patterns in large amounts of information: our eyes! Data visualization is concerned with taking information and turning it into pictures to better communicate patterns or discover new insights. It combines aspects of computer graphics, human-computer interaction, design, and perceptual psychology. In this course, we will learn the different ways in which data can be expressed visually and which methods work best for which tasks. Using this knowledge, we will critique existing visualizations as well as design and build new ones.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

CS 348.00 Parallel and Distributed Computing 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58566

David R Musicant

As multi-core machines become more prevalent, different programming paradigms have emerged for harnessing extra processors for better performance. This course explores parallel computation (programs that run on more than one core) as well as the related problem of distributed computation (programs that run on more than one machine). In particular, we will explore the two major paradigms for parallel programming, shared-memory multi-threading and message-passing, and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other possible topics include synchronization mechanisms, debugging concurrent programs, fork/join parallelism, the theory of parallelism and concurrency, parallel algorithms, cloud computing, and Map/Reduce.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

CS 348.01 Parallel and Distributed Computing 0 credits

Closed: Size: 1, Registered: 1, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59860

David R Musicant

As multi-core machines become more prevalent, different programming paradigms have emerged for harnessing extra processors for better performance. This course explores parallel computation (programs that run on more than one core) as well as the related problem of distributed computation (programs that run on more than one machine). In particular, we will explore the two major paradigms for parallel programming, shared-memory multi-threading and message-passing, and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other possible topics include synchronization mechanisms, debugging concurrent programs, fork/join parallelism, the theory of parallelism and concurrency, parallel algorithms, cloud computing, and Map/Reduce.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

CS 361.00 Evolutionary Computing and Artificial Life 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58567

Anya E Vostinar

An introduction to evolutionary computation and artificial life, with a special emphasis on the two way flow of ideas between evolutionary biology and computer science. Topics will include the basic principles of biological evolution, experimental evolution techniques, and the application of evolutionary computation principles to solve real problems. All students will be expected to complete and present a term project exploring an open question in evolutionary computation.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

CS 399.01 Senior Seminar 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 7, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
9:30am10:30am
Synonym: 58551

Sneha Narayan

As part of their senior capstone experience, majors will work together in teams (typically four to seven students per team) on faculty-specified topics to design and implement the first stage of a project. Required of all senior majors.

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Students are strongly encouraged to complete Computer Science 252 and Computer Science 257 before starting Computer Science 399.

CS 399.02 Senior Seminar 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:00pm3:00pm
Synonym: 58552

Sneha Narayan

As part of their senior capstone experience, majors will work together in teams (typically four to seven students per team) on faculty-specified topics to design and implement the first stage of a project. Required of all senior majors.

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Students are strongly encouraged to complete Computer Science 252 and Computer Science 257 before starting Computer Science 399.

CS 399.03 Senior Seminar 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 5, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
3:00pm4:00pm
Synonym: 58553

Sneha Narayan

As part of their senior capstone experience, majors will work together in teams (typically four to seven students per team) on faculty-specified topics to design and implement the first stage of a project. Required of all senior majors.

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Students are strongly encouraged to complete Computer Science 252 and Computer Science 257 before starting Computer Science 399.

CS 399.04 Senior Seminar 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58561

Jeffrey R Ondich

As part of their senior capstone experience, majors will work together in teams (typically four to seven students per team) on faculty-specified topics to design and implement the first stage of a project. Required of all senior majors.

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Students are strongly encouraged to complete Computer Science 252 and Computer Science 257 before starting Computer Science 399.

CS 399.05 Senior Seminar 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 3, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
9:30am10:30am
Synonym: 58562

Jeffrey R Ondich

As part of their senior capstone experience, majors will work together in teams (typically four to seven students per team) on faculty-specified topics to design and implement the first stage of a project. Required of all senior majors.

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Students are strongly encouraged to complete Computer Science 252 and Computer Science 257 before starting Computer Science 399.

CS 399.06 Senior Seminar 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
3:00pm4:00pm
Synonym: 58554

Jeffrey R Ondich

As part of their senior capstone experience, majors will work together in teams (typically four to seven students per team) on faculty-specified topics to design and implement the first stage of a project. Required of all senior majors.

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Students are strongly encouraged to complete Computer Science 252 and Computer Science 257 before starting Computer Science 399.

DANC 107.00 Ballet I 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58738

Jennifer Bader

A beginning course in ballet technique, including basic positions, beginning patterns and exercises. Students develop an awareness of the many ways their body can move, an appreciation of dance as an artistic expression and a recognition of the dancer as an athlete.

Cross-listed with PE 107

DANC 158.00 Contemporary Dance Forms I 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59666

Jane Shockley

This course provides an introduction to a variety of movement approaches that develop an awareness of the body in space and moving through space. Students will learn approaches designed to strengthen muscles, support joint mobility, find breath support, enhance coordination, and encourage embodied learning.

Cross-listed with PE 115

DANC 210.00 Contemporary Dance Forms II 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58743

Jane Shockley

This course is intended for students seeking to refine and deepen their awareness of embodied movement approaches. Through these approaches, students will work to develop an alert and articulate body. In both standing and floor work, momentum, dynamic shifts and spatial challenges are introduced.

Cross-listed with PE 116

DANC 253.00 Movement for the Performer 3 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58745

Jane Shockley

This course investigates the structure and function of the body through movement. Applying a variety of somatic techniques (feldenkrais, yoga, improvisation, body-mind centering). The emphasis will be to discover effortless movement, balance in the body and an integration of self in moving.

DANC 266.00 Reading The Dancing Body 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58762

Judith A Howard

Dance is a field in which bodies articulate a history of sexuality, nation, gender, and race. In this course, the investigation of the body as a “text” will be anchored by intersectional and feminist perspectives. We will re-center American concert dance history, emphasizing the Africanist base of American Dance performance, contemporary black choreographers, and Native American concert dance. Through reading, writing, discussing, moving, viewing videos and performances the class will “read” the gender, race, and politics of the dancing body in the cultural/historical context of Modern, Post Modern and Contemporary Dance.

DGAH 110.00 Hacking the Humanities 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 58764

Austin P Mason

The digital world is infiltrating the academy and profoundly disrupting the arts and humanities, posing fundamental challenges to traditional models of university education, scholarly research, academic publication and creative production. This core course for the Digital Arts & Humanities minor introduces the key concepts, debates and technologies that shape DGAH, including text encoding, digital mapping (GIS), network analysis, data visualization, 3D imaging and basic programming languages. Students will learn to hack the humanities by making a collaborative, publishable DH project, while acquiring the skills and confidence necessary to actively participate in the digital world, both in college and beyond.

ECON 110.03 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59385

Yaniv Ben-Ami

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59112

Faress F Bhuiyan

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59113

Mark T Kanazawa

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59114

Jenny Bourne

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 210.00 AI and Economics 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59633

Yaniv Ben-Ami

Artificial Intelligence, as a practical endeavor, is the attempt to use computers to analyze data in a way that mimics or is superior to human comprehension. When successful, Artificial Intelligence allows the study of large datasets that would not be possible otherwise. These datasets open new possibilities to study social behavior by analyzing large amounts of transactions, social media, satellite images, phone locations, etc. The aim of this course is to introduce students to some of the tools of Artificial Intelligence that are emerging as useful for economists. The focus of the course will be introducing students to the practical application of such tools in the context of a modern programming language such as Python or R. It will center on a series of demonstration exercises using real data. These would provide a starting point for students who might want to use Artificial Intelligence in their own projects.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

2nd five weeks

ECON 267.00 Behavioral Economics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59125

Jonathan M Lafky

This course introduces experimental economics and behavioral economics as two complementary approaches to understanding economic decision making. We will study the use of controlled experiments to test and critique economic theories, as well as how these theories can be improved by introducing psychologically plausible assumptions to our models. We will read a broad survey of experimental and behavioral results, including risk and time preferences, prospect theory, other-regarding preferences, the design of laboratory and field experiments, and biases in decision making.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 271.00 Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59126

Mark T Kanazawa

This course focuses on environmental economics, energy economics, and the relationship between them. Economic incentives for pollution abatement, the industrial organization of energy production, optimal depletion rates of energy sources, and the environmental and economic consequences of alternate energy sources are analyzed.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 274.00 Labor Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59127

Faress F Bhuiyan

Why do some people choose to work and others do not? Why are some people paid higher wages than others? What are the economic benefits of education for the individual and for society? How do government policies, such as subsidized child care, the Earned Income Tax Credit and the income tax influence whether people work and the number of hours they choose to work? These are some of the questions examined in labor economics. This course will focus on the labor supply and human capital decisions of individuals and households.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 282.00 The Theory of Investment Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59387

Yaniv Ben-Ami

This course provides an introduction to the main financial instruments that are used to fund economic activity. We will explore how investment products function and learn how to price a few of them. Attention will be given to the choices investors make, and should make, when allocating portfolios. Topics include bond pricing, stock pricing, option pricing, the mortgage market, hedge funds, private equity, optimal portfolios, defaults, financial intermediary capital, and investors' behavioral biases.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 330.00 Intermediate Price Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59115

Jenny Bourne

An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111

EDUC 110.00 Introduction to Educational Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58717

Jeff A Snyder

This course will focus on education as a multidisciplinary field of study. We will explore the meanings of education within individual lives and institutional contexts, learn to critically examine the assumptions that writers, psychologists, sociologists and philosophers bring to the study of education, and read texts from a variety of disciplines. What has "education" meant in the past? What does "education" mean in contemporary American society? What might "education" mean to people with differing circumstances and perspectives? And what should "education" mean in the future? Open only to first-and second-year students.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: EDUC 110.WL0 (Synonym 58718)

EDUC 338.00 Multicultural Education 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59629

Jeff A Snyder

This course focuses on the respect for human diversity, especially as these relate to various racial, cultural and economic groups, and to women. It includes lectures and discussions intended to aid students in relating to a wide variety of persons, cultures, and life styles.

Prerequisite: 100 or 200-level Educational Studies course or instructor permission

ENGL 112.00 Introduction to the Novel 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58902

Jessica L Leiman

This course explores the history and form of the British novel, tracing its development from a strange, sensational experiment in the eighteenth century to a dominant literary genre today. Among the questions that we will consider: What is a novel? What makes it such a popular form of entertainment? How does the novel participate in ongoing conversations about family, sex, class, race, and nation? How did a genre once considered a source of moral corruption become a legitimate literary form? Authors include: Daniel Defoe, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Bram Stoker, Virginia Woolf, and Jackie Kay.

ENGL 118.00 Introduction to Poetry 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58903

Constance Walker

We will look at the whole kingdom of poetry, exploring how poets use form, tone, sound, imagery, rhythm, and subject matter to create what Wallace Stevens called the "supreme fiction." Examples will be drawn from around the world, from Sappho to spoken word. Participation in discussion is mandatory; essay assignments will ask you to provide close readings of particular works; a couple of assignments will focus on the writing of poems so as to give you a full understanding of this ancient and living art.

ENGL 160.00 Creative Writing 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58904

Susan Jaret McKinstry

You will work in several genres and forms, among them: traditional and experimental poetry, prose fiction, and creative nonfiction. In your writing you will explore the relationship between the self, the imagination, the word, and the world. In this practitioner’s guide to the creative writing process, we will examine writings from past and current authors, and your writings will be critiqued in a workshop setting and revised throughout the term. 

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENGL 160.WL0 (Synonym 58905)

ENGL 215.00 Modern American Literature 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59674

Michael J Kowalewski

A survey of some of the central movements and texts in American literature, from World War I to the present. Topics covered will include modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat generation and postmodernism.

ENGL 220.01 Arts of Oral Presentation 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 14, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm
Synonym: 58906

Timothy Raylor

Instruction and practice in being a speaker and an audience in formal and informal settings.

1st 5 weeks

ENGL 220.02 Arts of Oral Presentation 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 14, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm7:00pm8:45pm
Synonym: 58907

Timothy Raylor

Instruction and practice in being a speaker and an audience in formal and informal settings.

2nd 5 weeks

ENGL 235.00 Asian American Literature 6 credits

Nancy J Cho

This course is an introduction to major works and authors of fiction, drama, and poetry from about 1900 to the present. We will trace the development of Asian American literary traditions while exploring the rich diversity of recent voices in the field. Authors to be read include Carlos Bulosan, Sui Sin Far, Philip Kan Gotanda, Maxine Hong Kingston, Jhumpa Lahiri, Milton Murayama, Chang-rae Lee, Li-young Lee, and John Okada.

ENGL 249.00 Modern Irish Literature: Poetry, Prose, and Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58914

Constance Walker

What can and should be the role of literature in times of bitter political conflict? Caught in partisan strife, Irish writers have grappled personally and painfully with the question. We will read works by Joyce, Yeats, and Heaney, among others, and watch films (Bloody SundayHunger) that confront the deep and ongoing divisions in Irish political life.

ENGL 258.00 Playwrights of Color: Taking the Stage 6 credits

Nancy J Cho

This course examines work by U.S. playwrights of color from the 1950s to the present, focusing on questions of race, performance, and self-representation. We will consider opportunities and limitations of the commercial theater, Off-Off Broadway, ethnic theaters, and non-traditional performance spaces. Playwrights may include Alice Childress, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ntozake Shange, Luis Valdez, Cherrie Moraga, August Wilson, David Henry Hwang, Philip Gotanda, Maria Irene Fornes, Anna Deavere Smith, and Chay Yew. We will watch selected film adaptations and attend a live performance when possible. 

ENGL 270.00 Short Story Workshop 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm4:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58908

Gregory B Smith

An introduction to the writing of the short story (prior familiarity with the genre of the short story is expected of class members). Each student will write and have discussed in class three stories (from 1,500 to 6,000 words in length) and give constructive suggestions, including written critiques, for revising the stories written by other members of the class. Attention will be paid to all the elements of fiction: characterization, point of view, conflict, setting, dialogue, etc.

Prerequisite: One prior 6-credit English course

ENGL 328.00 Victorian Poetry 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58916

Susan Jaret McKinstry

Living in an era of rapid progress and profound doubt, Victorian poets are prolific, challenging, inventive, and insistent that poetry address contemporary questions of social inequity, science, gender, nation, self, race, and knowledge itself. Readings will include works by Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning, Oscar Wilde, Matthew Arnold, Dante Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll), Gerard Manley Hopkins, and others, as well as cultural images and documents.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one other 6 credit English course

ENGL 359.00 World Literature in the Twenty-First Century 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 58917

Kofi Owusu

Our focus will be on contemporary writers who tend to localize the global and/or globalize the local in their decidedly textured fiction and nonfiction published since 2001. Selected writers include Zinzi Clemmons, Ta-Nehisi Coates, J.M. Coetzee, Junot Diaz, Esi Edugyan, Nuruddin Farah, Yaa Gyasi, Dinaw Mengestu, Chigozie Obioma, and Zadie Smith.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one additional 6 credit English course or instructor permission

ENTS 120.52 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am1:45pm5:45pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59644

Tsegaye H Nega

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 120.WL2 (Synonym 59646)

ENTS 120.53 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 59645

Tsegaye H Nega

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 120.WL3 (Synonym 59647)

FREN 102.01 Elementary French 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:15am9:20am8:30am9:40am8:15am9:20am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59266

Christine Lac

Building on the material covered in French 101, this course introduces complex sentences and additional verb tenses. Students apply the tools of narration in context through the reading of short literary and cultural texts. The focus of the course is on all four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). Taught five days a week in French.

Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent

FREN 102.02 Elementary French 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59267

Christine Lac

Building on the material covered in French 101, this course introduces complex sentences and additional verb tenses. Students apply the tools of narration in context through the reading of short literary and cultural texts. The focus of the course is on all four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). Taught five days a week in French.

Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent

FREN 102.03 Elementary French 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm2:50pm1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm2:50pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59268

Cédric Briand

Building on the material covered in French 101, this course introduces complex sentences and additional verb tenses. Students apply the tools of narration in context through the reading of short literary and cultural texts. The focus of the course is on all four skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). Taught five days a week in French.

Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent

FREN 204.00 Intermediate French 6 credits

Closed: Size: 19, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59269

Cherif Keïta

Through discussion of book-length literary and cultural texts (film, graphic novel, theater), and including in-depth grammar review, this course aims to help students acquire greater skill and confidence in both oral and written expression. Taught three days a week in French.

Prerequisite: French 103 or equivalent

FREN 206.00 Contemporary French and Francophone Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59270

Sandra E Rousseau

Through texts, images and films coming from different continents, this class will present Francophone cultures and discuss the connections and tensions that have emerged between France and other French speaking countries. Focused on oral and written expression this class aims to strengthen students’ linguistic skills while introducing them to the academic discipline of French and Francophone studies. The theme will be school and education in the Francophone world.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm
Synonym: 59271

Cherif Keïta

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 59272)

FREN 236.00 Francophone Cinema and the African Experience 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59274

Cherif Keïta

Born as a response to the colonial gaze (ethnographic films, in particular) and ideological discourse, African cinema has been a determined effort to capture and affirm an African personality and consciousness. Focusing on film production from Francophone Africa and its diaspora over the past few decades, this course will address themes such as slavery, colonialism, and national identity, as well as the immigrant experience in France and in Quebec. It will provide an introduction to African symbolisms, world-views, and narrative techniques.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 350.00 Middle East and French Connection 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59283

Sandra E Rousseau

PersepolisSyngue SabourLe rocher de Tanios—three prize-winning texts written in French by authors whose native tongue was not French but Arabic or Farsi. In this class we will direct our attention to the close—albeit problematic—relations between France and the Middle East (broadly considered) through an analysis of cultural and literary objects. What has this “French connection” meant for the Middle-Eastern and for French culture?

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

GEOL 110.52 Introduction to Geology and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am1:45pm5:45pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58280

Bereket Haileab

An introduction to the study of earth systems, physical processes operating on the earth, and the history of the earth.  Weekly online laboratories included.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken another 100-level Geology course

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 110.WL2 (Synonym 58281)

GEOL 250.52 Mineralogy and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 123 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am1:45pm5:45pm10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58283

Cameron Davidson

The study of the chemical and physical properties of minerals, their geologic occurrence and associations. Topics include crystallography, crystal chemistry, x-ray analysis, phase equilibria, classification, optical mineralogy, and environments of formation. Laboratories are included.

Prerequisite: One introductory (100-level) Geology course, or Chemistry 123 or 128.

GEOL 260.51 Coastal Marine Ecology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 125 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
2:00pm6:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59628

Clint A Cowan

Modern (and ancient) coastal marine benthic communities and their ecology. Topics will include the structure of coastal communities, organisms' interactions with each other and their environment, and a brief treatment of inshore physical oceanography. Settings covered will include intertidal rocky shorelines, estuaries, kelp forests, salt marshes, mangrove and coral reefs. Readings will focus on a series of landmark papers in nearshore marine ecology. Student research topics will explore topics related to modern and/or ancient crises in marine ecosystems.

Prerequisite: One 200-level course from either Geology or Biology or permission of the instructor

GEOL 315.53 Paleoclimate 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 149 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 58277

Dan P Maxbauer

The main objective of paleoclimatology is to reconstruct past climates in order to improve our understanding of the processes involved in controlling Earth’s climate at various timescales. This course will focus on climate reconstructions from local climate archives. Lab and some class time will be dedicated to group research projects. Reading and discussing primary literature is expected along with presentations and writing assignments related to research topics. Laboratories and one weekend field trip included.

Prerequisite: Two 200 level geology courses, or instructor consent

Extra Time Required

GERM 102.01 Elementary German 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59169

Kiley Kost

Further study of the basic structural patterns of the German language.

Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent

Students with course conflicts and a 5 day German language course, it is possible to register for MWF section 01 and TTh secton 02 German language courses. Contact jschicker@carleton.edu

GERM 102.02 Elementary German 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:05am12:10pm11:30am12:40pm11:05am12:10pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59170

Kiley Kost

Further study of the basic structural patterns of the German language.

Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent

Students with course conflicts and a 5 day German language course, it is possible to register for MWF section 01 and TTh secton 02 German language courses. Contact jschicker@carleton.edu

GERM 150.00 German Music and Culture from Mozart to Rammstein 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 57885

Juliane Schicker

In this course, we survey significant developments in German-language culture, broadly defined, from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century. Students of all disciplines and majors are invited to receive an overview of the music and culture of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, starting in the 1750s and tracing its impact into the present time. The course includes literature, film, music, language, history, habits, news, etc., and surveys major figures, movements, and their influence on the world’s civilization. The course encourages critical engagement with the material at hand and provides the opportunity to compare it with the students’ own cultural background. Taught in English.

In Translation

GERM 212.00 Contemporary Germany in Global Context 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 57888

Seth E Peabody

Over the past few years, Germany has been touted as the new leader of Europe, or even of the “free world,” and at the same time has seen a surge of bitter political division within its borders. The Berlin Wall fell thirty years ago, yet tensions between East and West remain stark. Chancellor Angela Merkel implemented an open-arms policy toward refugees, yet the extremist AfD party has orchestrated a troubling rise to power based on xenophobic sentiments. And while Germany has emerged as a global environmental leader, it has simultaneously faced passionate protest from its own youth regarding failure to meet the challenges of climate change. In this class, we examine the complexities behind these seeming contradictions in contemporary Germany by analyzing diverse texts ranging from political speeches to poetry slams. Taught in German; advanced grammar review supports analytical tasks.

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent

GRK 204.00 Intermediate Greek Prose and Poetry 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59176

Clara S Hardy

The goal for Intermediate Greek Prose and Poetry is to gain experience in the three major modes of Greek expression most often encountered “in the wild”—prose, poetry, and inscriptions—while exploring the notion of happiness and the good life. By combining all three modes into this one course, we hope both to create a suitable closure to the language sequence and to provide a reasonable foundation for further exploration of Greek literature and culture.

Prerequisite: Greek 103 with a grade of at least C-

GWSS 110.00 Introduction to Gender, Women's & Sexuality Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57916

Iveta Jusova

This course is an introduction to the ways in which gender and sexuality structure our world, and to the ways feminists challenge established intellectual frameworks. However, since gender and sexuality are not homogeneous categories, but are crosscut by class, race, ethnicity, citizenship and culture, we also consider the ways differences in social location intersect with gender and sexuality.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GWSS 110.WL0 (Synonym 59357)

GWSS 200.00 Gender, Sexuality & the Pursuit of Knowledge 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 57920

Meera Sehgal

In this course we will examine whether there are feminist and/or queer ways of knowing, the criteria by which knowledge is classified as feminist and the various methods used by feminist and queer scholars to produce this knowledge. Some questions that will occupy us are: How do we know what we know? Who does research? Does it matter who the researcher is? How does the social location (race, class, gender, sexuality) of the researcher affect research? Who is the research for? What is the relationship between knowledge, power and social justice? While answering these questions, we will consider how different feminist and queer studies researchers have dealt with them.

HEBR 101.00 Elementary Modern Hebrew 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:15pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59160

Stacy N Beckwith

Think beyond the Bible! Modern Hebrew is a vital language in several fields from religion and history to international relations and the sciences. This course is for students with no previous knowledge of Modern Hebrew or whose test scores indicate that this is an appropriate level of placement. We continually integrate listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Hebrew, incorporating materials from the Israeli internet and films into level appropriate class activities and assignments.

HIST 128.00 Slavery and Universities: Past and Present 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59448

Mike E Jirik

This class examines the history of colleges and universities and their connections to the political economy of Atlantic slavery and colonialism. Students will examine how the inception and evolution of American higher education was inextricably tied to the pocketbooks of enslavers as well as how colleges and universities directly benefited from the labor of enslaved people and the dispossession of Native Americans. Students will consider questions such as what is the role of the university in society. Central to the course will be studying this history’s impact in our own time. We will examine how scholars, activists, and university communities are grappling with these histories and their legacies today.

HIST 154.00 Social Movements in Postwar Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 57834

Seungjoo Yoon

This course tackles an evolving meaning of democracy and sovereignty in postwar Japan shaped by the transformative power of its social movements. We will place the anti-nuclear movement and anti-base struggles of the 1950s, the protest movements against revision of the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty of the 1960s, and environmentalist movements against the U.S. Cold War projects in Asia to see how they intersect with the worldwide “New Left” movements of the 1960s. Topics include student activism, labor unionism, Marxist movements, and gangsterism (yakuza). Students will engage with political art, photographs, manga, films, reportage, memoirs, autobiographies, interview records, novels, and detective stories.

HIST 159.00 Disaster, Disease, & Rumors in East Asia 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59769

Seungjoo Yoon

How are rumors generated and transmitted in a period of high anxiety like disaster? Do rumors and anxiety reciprocate? How do rumors enhance existing stereotypes and prejudices of people? Why do rumors arise in a society that suffers from inadequate information or the complete cutoff in communication? This course classifies the types and nature of rumors at the time of making modern East Asia. Thematically, it examines the interplay between wartime science, environmental conditions, and societal capacities in modern Japan, Korea, and China. Topics include rumor panics generated by epidemic, water pollution, atomic bomb, famine politics, industrial toxins, and lab leaks. 

HIST 200.00 Historians for Hire 2 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 2, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am
Synonym: 58961

Antony E Adler

A two-credit course in which students work with faculty oversight to complete a variety of public history projects with community partners. Students will work on a research project requiring them to identify and analyze primary sources, draw conclusions from the primary source research, and share their research with the appropriate audience in an appropriate form. We meet once a week at Carleton to ensure students maintain professional standards and strong relationships in their work. Potential projects include educational programming, historical society archival work, and a variety of local history opportunities. 

Extra Time Required

HIST 226.00 U.S. Consumer Culture 6 credits

Annette R Igra

In the period after 1880, the growth of a mass consumer society recast issues of identity, gender, race, class, family, and political life. We will explore the development of consumer culture through such topics as advertising and mass media, the body and sexuality, consumerist politics in the labor movement, and the response to the Americanization of consumption abroad. We will read contemporary critics such as Thorstein Veblen, as well as historians engaged in weighing the possibilities of abundance against the growth of corporate power.

HIST 230.00 Black Americans and the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59449

Mike E Jirik

What does a most turbulent period in U.S. history look like from the perspectives of Black women and men? What role did Black thought and resistance play in shaping the outcome of the war? What was interracial democracy during Reconstruction and why was it ultimately overthrown? These are a few of the myriad questions we will seek to answer by studying the central role of Black Americans in the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. We will examine how Black people participated in and shaped the politics of this period and we will critically engage the meanings of freedom, emancipation, and democracy.

HIST 308.00 American Cities and Nature 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Since the nation's founding, the percentage of Americans living in cities has risen nearly sixteenfold, from about five percent to the current eighty-one percent. This massive change has spawned legions of others, and all of them have bearing on the complex ways that American cities and city-dwellers have shaped and reshaped the natural world. This course will consider the nature of cities in American history, giving particular attention to the dynamic linkages binding these cultural epicenters to ecological communities, environmental forces and resource flows, to eco-politics and social values, and to those seemingly far-away places we call farms and wilderness. 

Prerequisite: History 205 or permission of the instructor

HIST 360.00 Muslims and Modernity 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Through readings in primary sources in translation, we will discuss the major intellectual and cultural movements that have influenced Muslim thinkers from the nineteenth century on. Topics include modernism, nationalism, socialism, and fundamentalism.

Prerequisite: At least one prior course in the history of the Middle East or Central Asia or Islam

HIST 398.01 Advanced Historical Writing 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58969

Thabiti C Willis

This course is designed to support majors in developing advanced skills in historical research and writing. Through a combination of class discussion, small group work, and one-on-one interactions with the professor, majors learn the process of constructing sophisticated, well-documented, and well-written historical arguments within the context of an extended project of their own design. They also learn and practice strategies for engaging critically with contemporary scholarship and effective techniques of peer review and the oral presentation of research. Concurrent enrollment in History 400 required. By permission of the instructor only.

HIST 400 required.

HIST 398.02 Advanced Historical Writing 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 58970

Annette R Igra

This course is designed to support majors in developing advanced skills in historical research and writing. Through a combination of class discussion, small group work, and one-on-one interactions with the professor, majors learn the process of constructing sophisticated, well-documented, and well-written historical arguments within the context of an extended project of their own design. They also learn and practice strategies for engaging critically with contemporary scholarship and effective techniques of peer review and the oral presentation of research. Concurrent enrollment in History 400 required. By permission of the instructor only.

HIST 400 required.

IDSC 103.01 Student Conversations about Diversity and Community 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 10, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59697

Alfred P Montero

In this course students participate in peer-led conversations about diversity and community at Carleton. Students complete readings and engage in experiential exercises that invite them to reflect on their own social identities and their attitudes toward race, gender, class, and sexuality. By taking risks and engaging in honest conversations and self-reflection, students work together to understand differences and to explore how to build communities that are welcoming and open to diversity. Students keep a weekly journal and write two reflective essays that are graded by faculty members.

IDSC 103.02 Student Conversations about Diversity and Community 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 10, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:45pm
Synonym: 59698

Alfred P Montero

In this course students participate in peer-led conversations about diversity and community at Carleton. Students complete readings and engage in experiential exercises that invite them to reflect on their own social identities and their attitudes toward race, gender, class, and sexuality. By taking risks and engaging in honest conversations and self-reflection, students work together to understand differences and to explore how to build communities that are welcoming and open to diversity. Students keep a weekly journal and write two reflective essays that are graded by faculty members.

IDSC 151.00 Plague, War, Crisis: Reading Hobbes Reading Thucydides: Books 3-5 Revolt and Revolution 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59455

Clara S Hardy, Timothy Raylor

We will meet once a week to read and discuss Books 3-5 of Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War in Thomas Hobbes’s famed translation of 1628 (subsequent books will be discussed in the course offered in the Spring term). We will attend to the literary art and to the political and social contexts of the original Greek, as well as to Hobbes’s recontextualization of it to the England of the 1620s. This bifocal approach may provoke insights into our current predicament. 

IDSC 198.01 FOCUS Colloquium 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm
Synonym: 59239

Fernan F Jaramillo

This colloquium is designed to give students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program an opportunity to learn and use skills in scientific study, reasoning, and modeling. The topics of this project-based colloquium will vary each term, and allow students to develop competencies in areas relevant to multiple science disciplines.

For students in IDSC 198 in fall term cohort

IDSC 198.02 FOCUS Colloquium 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 17, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm
Synonym: 59240

Fernan F Jaramillo

This colloquium is designed to give students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program an opportunity to learn and use skills in scientific study, reasoning, and modeling. The topics of this project-based colloquium will vary each term, and allow students to develop competencies in areas relevant to multiple science disciplines.

For students in the IDSC 198 winter cohort

IDSC 202.00 MMUF Research Seminar 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
5:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 59241

Cathy Yandell

This seminar develops the skills needed to engage in and communicate advanced research. Each participant will work and present regularly on their ongoing research projects, and participate actively in an ongoing series of workshops and conferences. The seminar will also discuss in depth the nature of academia as institution and culture, and the role of diversity in the production of knowledge and teaching in American higher education. Open only to students with MMUF fellow status.

Prerequisite: Participation in the Mellon Program/MMUF or MGSEF Program.

Must be MMUF Fellow

IDSC 236.00 Public Health in Practice 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59245

Debby R Walser-Kuntz

This course is the second part of a two-term sequence beginning with Perspectives in Public Health. Over the winter break, students will spend two weeks exploring a variety of public health organizations both locally (Minneapolis/St. Paul) and nationally. During the winter term, students will complete their final public health-related civic engagement project in collaboration with a community partner, set their individual project back into the wider context of public health, and prepare to present their experience to a broader audience.

Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Studies 235

Open only to students participating in OCS Winter Break Public Health Program

IDSC 251.01 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm9:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59242

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

IDSC 251.02 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59243

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

IDSC 298.00 FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:10pm
Synonym: 59244

Will Hollingsworth

This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community. The topics of this project-based colloquium will vary each term.

Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Studies 198 as first year student

Prior registration in IDSC 198

JAPN 102.01 Elementary Japanese 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:15am9:20am8:30am9:40am8:15am9:20am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59221

Noboru Tomonari

Continuation of Japanese 101.

Prerequisite: Japanese 101 or equivalent

JAPN 102.02 Elementary Japanese 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm2:50pm1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm2:50pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59222

Noboru Tomonari

Continuation of Japanese 101.

Prerequisite: Japanese 101 or equivalent

JAPN 205.01 Intermediate Japanese 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:05am12:10pm11:30am12:40pm11:05am12:10pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59223

Miaki Habuka

Continuation of Japanese 204. Completion of this course with a C- or better fulfills language requirement.

Prerequisite: Japanese 204 or equivalent

JAPN 205.02 Intermediate Japanese 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59229

Miaki Habuka

Continuation of Japanese 204. Completion of this course with a C- or better fulfills language requirement.

Prerequisite: Japanese 204 or equivalent

JAPN 356.00 The Japanese Response to COVID-19: Japanese Language Sources 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59410

Kevin P Mulholland

How have the Japanese responded to COVID-19?  By looking at newspaper articles, news videos, blogs, poems, manga, and other visual and verbal media sources, we will understand how the Japanese peoples are understanding and coping with the dramatic shifts in society caused by the pandemic. Students are encouraged to use their own localized experiences as a starting point for discussing and researching the Japanese responses. 

Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or equivalent

LCST 245.00 The Critical Toolbox: Who's Afraid of Theory? 6 credits

Seth E Peabody

This class introduces students to the various theoretical frameworks and the many approaches scholars can use when analyzing a text (whether this text is a film, an image, a literary piece or a performance). What do words like ‘structuralism,’ ‘ecocriticism,’ 'cultural studies,' and ‘postcolonial studies’ refer to? Most importantly, how do they help us understand the world around us? This class will be organized around interdisciplinary theoretical readings and exercises in cultural analysis.

Prerequisite: At least one 200- or 300-level course in Literary/Artistic Analysis (in any language) or instructor permission

LING 115.00 Introduction to the Theory of Syntax 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59081

Mike J Flynn

This course is organized to enable the student to actively participate in the construction of a rather elaborate theory of the nature of human cognitive capacity to acquire and use natural languages. In particular, we concentrate on one aspect of that capacity: the unconscious acquisition of a grammar that enables a speaker of a language to produce and recognize sentences that have not been previously encountered. In the first part of the course, we concentrate on gathering notation and terminology intended to allow an explicit and manageable description. In the second part, we depend on written and oral student contributions in a cooperative enterprise of theory construction.

LING 216.00 Generative Approaches to Syntax 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59082

Catherine R Fortin

This course has two primary goals: to provide participants with a forum to continue to develop their analytical skills (i.e. to 'do syntax'), and to acquaint them with generative syntactic theory, especially the Principles and Parameters approach. Participants will sharpen their technological acumen, through weekly problem solving, and engage in independent thinking and analysis, by means of formally proposing novel syntactic analyses for linguistic phenomena. By the conclusion of the course, participants will be prepared to read and critically evaluate primary literature couched within this theoretical framework.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 115

LING 288.00 The Structure of Dakota 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59087

Mike J Flynn

This course examines the nature of the endangered language Dakota, which was once spoken on what is today Carleton land. We will study several aspects of the language, including phonology, morphology, and syntax, with the assistance of speakers of the language from the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation. The goal of the course is to produce an array of careful, accurate, and clear descriptions of parts of the language, working towards a new pedagogical grammar of the language to be used in the construction of teaching materials for Dakota children. 

Prerequisite: Linguistics 115 or Linguistics 217 (Linguistics 217 can be taken simultaneously)

LING 317.00 Topics in Phonology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59088

Jenna T Conklin

More on phonology. This course examines a small number of topics in depth. Particular topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 217

LING 399.00 Senior Thesis 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 1, Registered: 1, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm2:45pm
Synonym: 59819

MATH 111.01 Introduction to Calculus 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58652

Kate J Meyer

An introduction to the differential and integral calculus. Derivatives, antiderivatives, the definite integral, applications, and the fundamental theorem of calculus.

Prerequisite: Requires placement via the Calculus Placement Exam 1, see Mathematics web page. Not open to students who have received credit for Mathematics 101.

MATH 120.01 Calculus 2 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58653

Rafe F Jones

Inverse functions, integration by parts, improper integrals, modeling with differential equations, vectors, calculus of functions of two independent variables including directional derivatives and double integrals, Lagrange multipliers.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101, 111, score of 4 or 5 on Calculus AB Exam, score of 5, 6, or 7 on Math IB exam or placement via a Carleton placement exam. Not open to students who have received credit for Mathematics 211 or have a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus BC ex

MATH 120.02 Calculus 2 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58654

MurphyKate Montee

Inverse functions, integration by parts, improper integrals, modeling with differential equations, vectors, calculus of functions of two independent variables including directional derivatives and double integrals, Lagrange multipliers.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101, 111, score of 4 or 5 on Calculus AB Exam, score of 5, 6, or 7 on Math IB exam or placement via a Carleton placement exam. Not open to students who have received credit for Mathematics 211 or have a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus BC ex

MATH 120.03 Calculus 2 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58655

Steve T Scheirer

Inverse functions, integration by parts, improper integrals, modeling with differential equations, vectors, calculus of functions of two independent variables including directional derivatives and double integrals, Lagrange multipliers.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101, 111, score of 4 or 5 on Calculus AB Exam, score of 5, 6, or 7 on Math IB exam or placement via a Carleton placement exam. Not open to students who have received credit for Mathematics 211 or have a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus BC ex

MATH 206.00 A Tour of Mathematics 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 45, Registered: 56, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
4:30pm5:30pm
Synonym: 58657

Kate J Meyer

A series of eight lectures intended for students considering a Mathematics major. The emphasis will be on presenting various striking ideas, concepts and results in modern mathematics, rather than on developing extensive knowledge or techniques in any particular subject area.

MATH 210.01 Calculus 3 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58658

Alex J Barrios

Vectors, curves, calculus of functions of three independent variables, including directional derivatives and triple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, line integrals, Green's theorem, sequences and series, power series, Taylor series.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 120. This course cannot be substituted for Mathematics 211

MATH 211.00 Introduction to Multivariable Calculus 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58660

Owen D Biesel

Vectors, curves, partial derivatives, gradient, multiple and iterated integrals, line integrals, Green's theorem.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 121, score of 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus BC exam, or placement via Calculus Placement Exam #3

MATH 232.01 Linear Algebra 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58661

Caroline L Turnage-Butterbaugh

Vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants, inner products and orthogonality, eigenvectors and eigenvalues.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 120 or Mathematics 211

MATH 232.02 Linear Algebra 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58662

Caroline L Turnage-Butterbaugh

Vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants, inner products and orthogonality, eigenvectors and eigenvalues.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 120 or Mathematics 211

MATH 236.00 Mathematical Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58663

MurphyKate Montee

Basic concepts and techniques used throughout mathematics. Topics include logic, mathematical induction and other methods of proof, problem solving, sets, cardinality, equivalence relations, functions and relations, and the axiom of choice. Other topics may include: algebraic structures, graph theory, and basic combinatorics.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 232 and either Mathematics 210 or Mathematics 211

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: MATH 236.WL0 (Synonym 58680)

MATH 240.00 Probability 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58681

Josh R Davis

(Formerly Mathematics 265) Introduction to probability and its applications. Topics include discrete probability, random variables, independence, joint and conditional distributions, expectation, limit laws and properties of common probability distributions.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 120 or Mathematics 211

Formerly Mathematics 265

MATH 240.02 Probability 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59751

Alexander Garver

(Formerly Mathematics 265) Introduction to probability and its applications. Topics include discrete probability, random variables, independence, joint and conditional distributions, expectation, limit laws and properties of common probability distributions.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 120 or Mathematics 211

Formerly Mathematics 265

MATH 241.00 Ordinary Differential Equations 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58664

Rob C Thompson

An introduction to ordinary differential equations, including techniques for finding solutions, conditions under which solutions exist, and some qualitative analysis.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 232 or instructor permission

MATH 241.02 Ordinary Differential Equations 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm8:10pm7:00pm8:10pm7:00pm8:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58665

Rob C Thompson

An introduction to ordinary differential equations, including techniques for finding solutions, conditions under which solutions exist, and some qualitative analysis.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 232 or instructor permission

MATH 312.00 Elementary Theory of Numbers 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59372

Alex J Barrios

Properties of the integers. Topics include the Euclidean algorithm, classical unsolved problems in number theory, prime factorization, Diophantine equations, congruences, divisibility, Euler's phi function and other multiplicative functions, primitive roots, and quadratic reciprocity. Other topics may include integers as sums of squares, continued fractions, distribution of primes, integers in extension fields, p-adic numbers.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 236 or instructor permission

MATH 321.00 Real Analysis I 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58684

Kate J Meyer

A systematic study of concepts basic to calculus, such as topology of the real numbers, limits, differentiation, integration, convergence of sequences, and series of functions.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 236 or instructor permission

MATH 352.00 Topics in Abstract Algebra 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58685

Mark Krusemeyer

An intensive study of one or more of the types of algebraic systems studied in Mathematics 342.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 342

MUSC 185.05 Carleton Choir 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 50, Registered: 1, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
6:00pm7:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59694

Matthew J Olson

The Carleton Choir, the cornerstone of the choral program, is a select mixed chorus of Carleton students. Each term, the ensemble presents a concert of short and extended works from the large bodies of classical, ethnic, and cultural repertories, including works for mixed, treble, and tenor-bass voices. Concerts are sometimes repeated off campus. Students must have good vocal skills, music reading ability, and a high degree of interest in performing quality choral music. Admission is by audition.

Prerequisite: Audition

MUSC 211.00 Western Music and its Social Ecosystems, 1600-1830 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 57747

Brooke H McCorkle

Western classical music, especially in the academy and the concert hall, enshrines the white racial frame. In this class we begin deconstructing that music’s white racial frame by interrogating how the classical canon came about, what it entails, and acknowledging how it is active in musical activities (called musicking) of the past and present. We will study the relationships between performers, listeners, and composers (social ecosystems) and consider the music and stories of those who have historically been excluded from the canon, including BIPOC, LGBTQIA+, and female artists. Through a variety of assignments including online posts, in-class discussions, and a final project that can take the form of a written paper or creative work, students will develop critical thinking, listening, and communication skills to help them succeed in their various musical endeavors. An ability to read music is not required, but students should be prepared to think deeply about sound and its meanings.

Prerequisite: Ability to read music preferred, but not required

MUSC 220.00 Composition Studio 6 credits

Closed: Size: 7, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59669

Andrea Mazzariello

This course focuses on creating new music, through several exercises as well as a substantial term composition. Class meetings reinforce key concepts, aesthetic trends, and compositional techniques, as well as provide opportunities for group feedback on works in progress. Individual instruction focuses on students' own creative work in depth and detail.

Prerequisite: Music 110, 204 or instructor permission

MUSC 246.00 Music in Racism and Antiracism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59722

Deborah Appleman, Ronald Rodman, Melinda Russell

Music has a long, ugly history as a tool for the transmission of racism, and a vital one as a weapon against it. We will survey important instantiations at the intersections of music and racism in blackface minstrelsy, western classical music, Dalit music, Albinism, the U.S. national anthem, white nationalism, and the anti-apartheid movement, among others. Centering racism and antiracism, we will investigate the careers and musical output of five musicians: Paul Robeson, Pete Seeger, Hazel Scott, Charity Bailey, and Janelle Monae. Students will complete an original guided research project on a topic of their choice. No musical experience required.

PE 103.02 Aikido, Beginning 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 10, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
6:30pm7:20pm6:30pm7:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59658

Eric C Schlichting, Kristina N Syx, Aaron J Chaput,

Developed from samurai traditions, Aikido is Japanese budo--a method of training and study that applies the physical principles of a martial art toward the goals of peace, harmony, and self-improvement. The movements of Aikido focus on learning to move in harmony with another, yet can be an effective self-defense. Students also learn many ways of falling safely and getting up quickly. Applied properly, the insights gained can lead to better self-respect and more harmonious relationships. Class fee of $30 will be automatically charged to tuition account.

$30 class fee will be auto-charged to tuition

PE 107.00 Ballet I 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58748

Jennifer Bader

A beginning course in ballet technique, including basic positions, beginning patterns and exercises. Students develop an awareness of the many ways their body can move, an appreciation of dance as an artistic expression and a recognition of the dancer as an athlete.

Crosslisted with DANC 107

Cross-listed with DANC 107.00

PE 108.00 Ballet II 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57503

Jennifer Bader

For the student with previous ballet experience this course emphasizes articulation of the technique and development of ballet vocabulary and movement theories. Opportunity to continue to work on technique and to more finely tune the awareness of movement begun in Level I.

Crosslisted with DANC 208

Cross-listed with DANC 208.00

PE 115.00 Contemporary Dance Forms I 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59649

Jane Shockley

This course provides an introduction to a variety of movement approaches that develop an awareness of the body in space and moving through space. Students will learn approaches designed to strengthen muscles, support joint mobility, find breath support, enhance coordination, and encourage embodied learning.

Cross-listed with DANC 158

Cross-listed with DANC 158.00

PE 116.00 Contemporary Dance Forms II 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58751

Jane Shockley

This course is intended for students seeking to refine and deepen their awareness of embodied movement approaches. Through these approaches, students will work to develop an alert and articulate body. In both standing and floor work, momentum, dynamic shifts and spatial challenges are introduced.

Cross-listed with DANC 210

Cross-listed with DANC 210.00

PE 124.00 Fitness for the Athlete 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58710

Jessica J Mueller

For the off-season or pre-season competitor (IM, club, or varsity). The winter term course will focus on those who want to stay in shape and hone their flexibility, balance, strength and an aerobic threshold. This is a challenging course that will teach techniques and strategies to work out on your own as well as motivate you to improve or work weaker areas. Incorporating training on the track, free weights, bosu, plyometrics and much more.

PE 142.02 Karate 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHFS
6:30pm8:00pm10:00am12:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59652

Aaron J Chaput, Annie M Larson

An art of self-defense which originated in Okinawa. Karate involves mastering techniques, sharpening concentration and refining one's spirit. Karate develops self-confidence and self-discipline while providing a solid workout. Ideally, the Karateka carries a clarity of concentration and serenity of spirit every day in whatever she/he is doing. Beginners are welcome and appreciated. $20 class fee will be automatically charged on tuition account.

$20 fee automatically charged to tuition bill.

PE 162.00 Women's Health & Fitness 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 39, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59654

Jacki C Smith, Amy Erickson

This class will explore current fitness, health, and nutrition topics. Each class will begin with discussion/dialogue between instructor and students, followed by physical activity. Over the course of this ten week class you will be introduced to a variety of physical activities both indoors and outside. This course is largely designed for non-athletes who are looking for fitness and nutrition exposure and the options available to them on or near Carleton's campus. The goal is to find an activity that will encourage students to engage in daily activity and improve their overall health and well-being. Each term this course is offered new activities will be introduced focusing on improving coordination, strength, flexibility and aerobic capacity.

PE 171.02 Step Aerobics 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 50, Registered: 98, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
5:15pm6:25pm5:15pm6:25pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59655

Russ J Petricka

This class begins with a 5-7 minute warm-up and then moves toward a 20-25 minute straight aerobics routine. Then steps are incorporated into a 20-25 minute aerobics workout. The remaining class time ends with 5-7 minutes of stretches in which one muscle group is chosen for special emphasis and effort.

PE 198.00 Yoga, Continuing 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 40, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:05am12:10pm11:05am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 57538

Kris A Layman, Annie M Larson

This is a continuation and overview in yoga, an integrated approach to health. This course incorporates the practice of breathing techniques, hatha yoga postures (asanas), meditation, and relaxation. Emphasis is on techniques to increase range of motion, strength and endurance, balance and coordination. Having a basic understanding of the poses, you will now begin to fine tune the postures and deepen your practice. Appropriate for those with yoga experience.

PE 199.00 Yoga, Lifestyle 0 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 100, Registered: 81, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
9:40am10:45am9:40am10:45am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59656

Kris A Layman

This class is for all levels of yoga experience. This yoga lifestyle class will take your yoga off the mat and into your daily life. A large part of the class will include discussions and practices for: breathing exercises, guided relaxation techniques, meditation, physical asana (yoga poses) and discussion on nutrition and sleep. Students will be asked to write a paragraph weekly about their home practice experience. You will be building physical strength and stability, as well as awareness surrounding mental and emotional ease.  Please note, discussions will include practices utilized outside of class (which can be 5 minutes a day). This is an all levels class and beginners are welcome.  

PHIL 210.00 Logic 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59056

Douglas B Marshall

The study of formal logic has obvious and direct applicability to a wide variety of disciplines (including mathematics, computer science, linguistics, philosophy, cognitive science, and many others). Indeed, the study of formal logic helps us to develop the tools and know-how to think more clearly about arguments and logical relationships in general; and arguments and logical relationships form the backbone of any rational inquiry. In this course we will focus on propositional logic and predicate logic, and look at the relationship that these have to ordinary language and thought.

PHIL 228.00 Freedom and Alienation in Black American Philosophy 6 credits

Eddie E O'Byrn

The struggle of freedom against forms of alienation is both a historical and contemporary characteristic of Black/African-American philosophy. In this course we will explore how a variety of Black/African-American philosophers theorize these concepts. The aim of the course is to both offer resources for familiarizing students with African-American philosophers and develop an appreciation for critical philosophical voices in the Black intellectual tradition. The course will range from slave narratives, reconstruction, and civil rights to contemporary prison abolitionism, intersectionality, and afro-pessimism. The texts of the course will include: Angela Davis’ Lectures on Liberation, Frederick Douglass’ Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells Southern Horrors, George Yancy’s African-American Philosophers 17 Conversations, and Afro-Pessimism: An Introduction. As well as select articles from historical and contemporary Black/African-American philosophers.

PHIL 272.00 Early Modern Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59052

Douglas B Marshall

This course offers an introduction to major aspects of European theories of being and knowledge during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Key topics to be examined include:  the distinction between the mind and the body; the existence and nature of God; the relationship between cause and effect; the scope and nature of human knowledge. We will place a special emphasis on understanding the philosophical thought of René Descartes, Anne Conway, G. W. Leibniz, and David Hume. Two themes will recur throughout the course: first, the evolving relationships between philosophy and the sciences of the period; second, the philosophical contributions of women in the early modern era.

PHYS 143.52 Physical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm5:45pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58220

Helen K Minsky

This course begins with an introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 144, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 143.WL2 (Synonym 58221)

PHYS 144.54 Astrophysical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm5:45pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58222

Barry N Costanzi, Chris J West

This course begins by considering basic principles of physics in the realm of planetary systems, black holes and dark matter in the universe. Conservation of energy and momentum will be used to explore large-scale phenomena in the cosmos. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 143, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students. Appropriate for students with prior calculus-based physics course such as an AP or IB course.

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 144.WL4 (Synonym 58224)

PHYS 144.57 Astrophysical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm8:00am12:00pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 58223

Barry N Costanzi

This course begins by considering basic principles of physics in the realm of planetary systems, black holes and dark matter in the universe. Conservation of energy and momentum will be used to explore large-scale phenomena in the cosmos. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 143, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students. Appropriate for students with prior calculus-based physics course such as an AP or IB course.

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 144.WL7 (Synonym 58225)

PHYS 165.52 Introduction to Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am1:45pm5:45pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58226

David C Harrison

A study of the principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics with an emphasis on real-world applications including electronics, laser physics, astronomy, and medicine. Topics include electric and magnetic fields, electric potentials, DC and AC circuits, geometric and wave optics, and relevant properties of matter. Designed for science majors who want additional background in physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 143, 144, or 145. Mathematics 120 or 121 suggested

PHYS 165.59 Introduction to Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58227

David C Harrison

A study of the principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics with an emphasis on real-world applications including electronics, laser physics, astronomy, and medicine. Topics include electric and magnetic fields, electric potentials, DC and AC circuits, geometric and wave optics, and relevant properties of matter. Designed for science majors who want additional background in physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 143, 144, or 145. Mathematics 120 or 121 suggested

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58830

Kent Freeze

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 58831)

POSC 160.00 Political Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58833

Laurence D Cooper

Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions.

POSC 202.00 Tools of National Power: Statecraft and Diplomatic Power 3 credits

Thomas R Hanson

In this section of three related five-week courses, we will study the role of diplomacy as a component of U.S. statecraft.  An active and informed diplomacy can help achieve international cooperation in the face of shared global threats, while helping to forestall conflict and forwarding U.S. national interests. Yet in recent decades, diplomacy has often been overshadowed by military intervention and economic sanctions as a tool of power. We will discuss the history of diplomacy, including the specific traditions of U.S. diplomatic practice. Using case studies taken from current issues, we will assess how diplomacy functions in practice and reflect on the future role of diplomats in a world of dramatic change. Course modalities will include focused readings, active class discussion, and short papers.

1st five week

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58835

Eric S Mosinger

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275) or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5)

POSC 262.00 Displaced Lives: Freedom and Meaning 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59670

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

To feel secure and accepted by society are essential human needs. However, even a cursory look at the 20th century shows how often and unexpectedly the lives of individuals were profoundly disrupted and crushed by the forces of nature and history. Security and social acceptance are fragile gifts of history. If so, what freedom and meaning, if at all, are to be found in living a displaced life, against and through the destructive tidal waves of history? The course tries to answer this question through an engagement with the memoirs and writings of Stefan Zweig, Edward Said, Norman Manea, Mikhail Bulgakov, Karl Ove Knausgaard, and James Baldwin.

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58849

Greg G Marfleet

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 284.00 War and Peace in Northern Ireland 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58851

Dev Gupta

This class examines the decades-long conflict in Northern Ireland between Catholics and Protestants known as "The Troubles." We will investigate the causes of violence in this region and explore the different phases of the conflict, including initial mobilization of peaceful protestors, radicalization into violent resistance, and de-escalation. We will also consider the international dimensions of the conflict and how groups forged transnational ties with diaspora groups and separatist movements around the world. Finally, we will explore the consequences of this conflict on present-day Northern Ireland's politics and identify lessons from the peace process for other societies in conflict.

POSC 306.00 The Psychology of Identity Politics and Group Behavior 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59635

Krissy K Lunz Trujillo

In recent years we have heard a lot about “identity politics.” This course aims to answer the question, why do people form group-based identities and how do they impact mass political attitudes and behavior? Using examples from American politics, we will examine the psychological underpinnings of identity and group-based affiliations as well as their political consequences. In doing so, we will explore how bias, prejudice, and social hierarchy are formed, maintained, and changed. Such evaluations will be based on discussions of various dominant and minority group identities including partisanship, race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, religion, and place. 

POSC 328.00 Foreign Policy Analysis* 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
7:00pm9:30pm7:00pm9:30pm
Synonym: 58853

Greg G Marfleet

Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended.

POSC 355.00 Identity, Culture and Rights* 6 credits

Barbara Allen

This course will look at the contemporary debate in multiculturalism in the context of a variety of liberal philosophical traditions, including contractarians, libertarians, and Utilitarians. These views of the relationship of individual to community will be compared to those of the communitarian and egalitarian traditions. Research papers may use a number of feminist theory frameworks and methods.

PSYC 110.01 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58333

Emily A Hazlett

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 110.02 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58349

Mija M Van Der Wege

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 200.00 Measurement and Data Analysis in Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58334

Julie J Neiworth

The course considers the role of measurement and data analysis focused on behavioral sciences. Various forms of measurement and standards for the evaluation of measures are explored. Students learn how to summarize, organize, and evaluate data using a variety of techniques that are applicable to research in psychology and other disciplines. Among the analyses discussed and applied are tests of means, various forms of analysis of variance, correlation and regression, planned and post-hoc comparisons, as well as various non-parametric tests. Research design is also explored.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor consent; Concurrent registration in Psychology 201

PSYC 201 required.

PSYC 201.01 Measurement and Data Analysis Lab 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58335

Julie J Neiworth

This lab course accompanies the lecture course, Psychology 200, and must be taken during the same term. The lab will provide an opportunity to explore lecture topics more deeply, and in particular emphasize data collection and computational skills.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 and concurrent registration in Psychology 200

PSYC 200 required.

PSYC 201.02 Measurement and Data Analysis Lab 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58336

Julie J Neiworth

This lab course accompanies the lecture course, Psychology 200, and must be taken during the same term. The lab will provide an opportunity to explore lecture topics more deeply, and in particular emphasize data collection and computational skills.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 and concurrent registration in Psychology 200

PSYC 200 required.

PSYC 218.00 Hormones, Brain, and Behavior 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 58353

Sarah H Meerts

In this course, students will learn about how hormones act in the brain and the body to affect behaviors. This course draws heavily on biological psychology and students learn about techniques in neuroendocrinology to better understand cellular function, neural circuits, and the display of behaviors. Team-based learning and case studies are used to explore the endocrine system, sexual differentiation, the stress response, thirst and digestion, and reproductive behaviors. The experimental evidence upon which our understanding of hormones, brain, and behavior is constructed is emphasized.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110. Psychology 216 recommended or permission of the instructor

PSYC 220.00 Sensation and Perception 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 35, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58354

Julia F Strand

We will address the question of how humans acquire information from the world to support action, learning, belief, choice, and the host of additional mental states that comprise the subject matter of psychology. In other words "How do we get the outside inside?" We will initially consider peripheral anatomical structures (e.g. the eye) and proceed through intermediate levels of sensory coding and transmission to cover the brain regions associated with each of the major senses. Readings will include primary sources and a text. In addition to exams and papers, students will conduct an investigation into an area of personal interest. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor consent

PSYC 221.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Sensation and Perception 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
9:00am12:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58355

Julia F Strand

This course accompanies Psychology 220. Students will replicate classical phenomena and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human perceptual processes. Psychology 221 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 220. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

PSYC 220 required

PSYC 221.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Sensation and Perception 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm4:45pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 58356

Julia F Strand

This course accompanies Psychology 220. Students will replicate classical phenomena and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human perceptual processes. Psychology 221 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 220. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

PSYC 220 required

PSYC 233.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 58306

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with CGSC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both to complete the LS requirement

Prerequisite: Psychology 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or instructor permission.

PSYC 232 required. Cross listed with CGSC 233.

Cross-listed with CGSC 233.01

PSYC 233.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 58307

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with CGSC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both to complete the LS requirement

Prerequisite: Psychology 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or instructor permission.

PSYC 232 required. Cross listed with CGSC 233.

Cross-listed with CGSC 233.02

PSYC 384.00 Psychology of Prejudice 6 credits

Sharon A Akimoto

This seminar introduces students to major psychological theories and research on the development, perpetuation and reduction of prejudice. A social and historical approach to race, culture, ethnicity and race relations will provide a backdrop for examining psychological theory and research on prejudice formation and reduction. Major areas to be discussed are cognitive social learning, group conflict and contact hypothesis.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. Psychology 256 or 258 recommended

PSYC 399.00 Capstone Seminar 6 credits

Closed: Size: 2, Registered: 2, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59802

Sarah H Meerts

Each of the three capstone seminars focus on a topic of interest to students in psychology. The goals of the course are to consider questions on a selected topic through reading primary research and discussion and review skills pertinent to scholarly investigation within the topic. Students are then mentored through a substantial paper related to the seminar topic.

Prerequisite: Several 200-level Psychology courses and senior Psychology major

RELG 110.00 Understanding Religion 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58984

Elizabeth F Dolfi

How can we best understand the role of religion in the world today, and how should we interpret the meaning of religious traditions -- their texts and practices -- in history and culture? This class takes an exciting tour through selected themes and puzzles related to the fascinating and diverse expressions of religion throughout the world. From politics and pop culture, to religious philosophies and spiritual practices, to rituals, scriptures, gender, religious authority, and more, students will explore how these issues emerge in a variety of religions, places, and historical moments in the U.S. and across the globe.

RELG 239.00 Religion & American Landscape 6 credits

Michael D McNally

The American landscape is rich in sacred places.  The religious imaginations, practices, and beliefs of its diverse inhabitants have shaped that landscape and been shaped by it. This course explores ways of imagining relationships between land, community, and the sacred, the mapping of religious traditions onto American land and cityscapes, and theories of sacred space and spatial practices. Topics include religious place-making practices of Indigenous, Latinx, and African Americans, as well as those of Euro-American communities from Puritans, Mormons, immigrant farmers.

RELG 287.00 Many Marys 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

The history of Christianity usually focuses on Jesus: the stories and doctrines that have revolved around him. This course will focus on Mary and the many ways she has contributed to the various lived traditions of Christianity. We will, for example, consider the mother of Jesus (Miriam, as she was first called) as she has figured in literature, art, apparition, and ritual practice around the world. We will also consider Mary Magdalene, her foil, who appears in popular discourse from the Gnostic gospels to The Da Vinci Code. Case studies, texts, images, and film will be our fare.

RELG 300.00 Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58986

Michael D McNally

What, exactly, is religion and what conditions of modernity have made it urgent to articulate such a question in the first place? Why does religion exert such force in human society and history? Is it an opiate of the masses or an illusion laden with human wish-fulfillment? Is it a social glue? A subjective experience of the sacred? Is it simply a universalized Protestant Christianity in disguise, useful in understanding, and colonizing, the non-Christian world? This seminar, for junior majors and advanced majors from related fields, explores generative theories from anthropology, sociology, psychology, literary studies, and the history of religions.

RELG 399.00 Senior Research Seminar 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 58988

Asuka Sango

This seminar will acquaint students with research tools in various fields of religious studies, provide an opportunity to present and discuss research work in progress, hone writing skills, and improve oral presentation techniques.

Prerequisite: Religion 300 and acceptance of proposal for senior integrative exercise and instructor permission.

RUSS 102.01 Elementary Russian 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59152

Laura Goering, Anna M Dotlibova

Continues Russian 101.

Prerequisite: Russian 101 or equivalent

RUSS 102.02 Elementary Russian 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am1:45pm2:50pm10:00am11:10am1:45pm2:50pm9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59154

Laura Goering, Anna M Dotlibova

Continues Russian 101.

Prerequisite: Russian 101 or equivalent

RUSS 261.00 Lolita 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59710

Diane M Nemec Ignashev

Rejected by every major publisher, first released in France in 1955 by a press known for pornographic trash, Vladimir Nabokov's scandalous novel about a middle-aged immigrant college professor obsessed with a twelve-year-old girl continues to feed controversy as well as to challenge and delight readers with its labyrinthian narrative, endless wordplay, innumerable intertextual allusions, and troublesome eroticism. In addition to reading the novel, we will focus on critical approaches that address the cultural clash underlying the ostensible plot, changing reception, and reception of the novel outside the US. Thus warned, you are invited to join the jury in deliberating the designs and delights of this twentieth-century literary classic.

RUSS 293.00 Advanced Russian Skill Development 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59750

Anna M Dotlibova

In this course students use authentic materials to learn about selected aspects of Russian culture in global context, while continuing to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. For students who have completed the language requirement in Russian.  

 

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or instructor consent

RUSS 301.00 Current Events in the Russophone Media 3 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59721

Diane M Nemec Ignashev

In weekly meetings we will discuss in Russian current events taking place in Russia and around the world as reported by the Russophone online media. Emphasis will be on reading, listening, and conversation. Vocabulary building by topics; grammar as needed.

Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent registration in Russian 205 or instructor consent

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59030

Ahmed S Ibrahim

An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 59031)

SOAN 111.00 Introduction to Sociology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59008

Wes D Markofski

Sociology is an intellectual discipline, spanning the gap between the sciences and humanities while often (though not always) involving itself in public policy debates, social reform, and political activism. Sociologists study a startling variety of topics using qualitative and quantitative methods. Still, amidst all this diversity, sociology is centered on a set of core historical theorists (Marx/Weber/Durkheim) and research topics (race/class/gender inequality). We will explore these theoretical and empirical foundations by reading and discussing influential texts and select topics in the study of social inequality while relating them to our own experiences and understanding of the social world. 

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 111.WL0 (Synonym 59009)

SOAN 208.00 Gentrification 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59596

Colin McLaughlin-Alcock

Gentrification, a process of neighborhood-level class displacement, whereby devalued urban areas are redeveloped into trendy hubs, is one of the predominant modes of urban change in the twenty-first century. In this class, we will first develop a general understanding of how gentrification works. Then we will direct ethnographic attention to explore how gentrification takes place in specific contexts around the globe. We will examine how social boundaries, power relationships, and identities are reorganized through gentrification; how class and racial disparity are produced and enforced; how the social meaning of place impacts neighborhood change; and how communities have resisted gentrification.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 226.00 Anthropology of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59034

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

We all lead gendered lives, in our felt identities as well as through how we are perceived, advantaged, and disadvantaged by others. This course examines gender and gender relations from an anthropological perspective, centering and contextualizing the global human diversity of gendered experiences. Key concepts such as gender, voice/mutedness, status, public and private spheres, and the gendered division of labor—and their intellectual history—let us explore intriguing questions such as how many genders there are, and whether gender is mutable. The course focuses on two areas: 1) the role of sex, sexuality, and procreation in creating cultural notions of gender, and 2) the impacts of colonialism, globalization, and economic underdevelopment on gender relations.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above.

SOAN 228.00 Public Sociology of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59017

Wes D Markofski

From the discipline’s earliest days, sociologists have considered religion a fascinating and perplexing object of study. Classical sociologists devoted enormous attention to the topic of religion, famously linking it to the development of capitalism and Western modernity (Weber), to social solidarity and symbolic classification systems (Durkheim), to political passivity and social conservatism (Marx), and to the varying forms of social, economic, and political life found in the world’s great civilizations. This course focuses on special topics in the contemporary sociology of religion, with a particular emphasis on religion in public and political life in American and global civil society.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses number 200 or above

SOAN 233.00 Anthropology of Food 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:45pm3:30pm1:45pm3:30pm
Synonym: 59018

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Food is the way to a person's heart but perhaps even more interesting, the window into a society's soul. Simply speaking understating a society's foodways is the best way to comprehend the complexity between people, culture and nature. This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior, from food procurement and consumption practices to the politics of nutrition and diets. In doing so we hope to elucidate how food is more than mere sustenance and that often the act of eating is a manifestation of power, resistance, identity, and community. Class fees apply.

Sophomore Priority, Class Fees Apply

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 233.WL0 (Synonym 59695)

SOAN 314.00 Contemporary Issues in Critical Criminology 6 credits

Annette M Nierobisz

In this course we examine contemporary criminological issues from the critical perspectives offered by sociologists. Topics under examination include: how crime is conventionally defined, measured, and theorized; societal reactions to crime; and punishment of those who are deemed criminal. While exploring these topics, we will consider the impact of race, gender, and social class in shaping individuals’ interactions with the U.S. criminal justice system. Students will also seek a cross-national comparative understanding. Course readings primarily consist of theoretical and ethnographic accounts supplemented with statistical summaries.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 325.00 Sociology of Adoption and Assisted Reproduction 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59020

Liz Y Raleigh

Where do babies come from? Whereas once the answer was relatively straight forward, the growth of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and adoption has changed the field of potential answers. Nowadays babies can come from birthmothers, egg donors, and surrogates. In this course we will examine the meaning and making of families across these different types of formations and contextualize the popularity of ART relative to the decrease in adoption. We will take a sociological approach to analyzing these issues, paying particular attention to questions surrounding women's rights, baby "markets," and the racialization of children placed for adoption in the U.S.

Prerequisite: Prior Sociology/Anthropology course or instructor permission

SOAN 331.00 Anthropological Thought and Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 59010

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

A systematic introduction to the theoretical foundations of social and cultural anthropology with special emphasis given to twentieth century British, French and American schools. The course deals with such seminal figures as Morgan, Boas, Malinowski, Radcliffe-Brown, Levi-Straus, Harris, Sahlins, Bourdieu, Geertz, and Appadurai. The reading strikes a balance between ethnographic accounts and theoretical statements.

Prerequisite: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 or instructor permission

SPAN 102.01 Elementary Spanish 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:15am9:20am8:30am9:40am8:15am9:20am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59301

Linda D Burdell

This course introduces complex sentences and various tenses and short literary and cultural texts. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent

SPAN 102.02 Elementary Spanish 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:15am9:20am8:30am9:40am8:15am9:20am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 59302

Claudia M Lange

This course introduces complex sentences and various tenses and short literary and cultural texts. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent

SPAN 102.03 Elementary Spanish 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am10:00am11:10am9:40am10:45am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 59303

Linda D Burdell

This course introduces complex sentences and various tenses and short literary and cultural texts. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent

SPAN 102.04 Elementary Spanish 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:05am12:10pm11:30am12:40pm11:05am12:10pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59304

Palmar M Alvarez-Blanco

This course introduces complex sentences and various tenses and short literary and cultural texts. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent

SPAN 102.05 Elementary Spanish 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm2:50pm1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm2:50pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59305

Beatriz Pariente-Beltran

This course introduces complex sentences and various tenses and short literary and cultural texts. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent

SPAN 102.06 Elementary Spanish 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm2:50pm1:00pm2:10pm1:45pm2:50pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 59306

Silvia Lopez

This course introduces complex sentences and various tenses and short literary and cultural texts. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent

SPAN 102.08 Elementary Spanish 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:15pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:15pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 59307

Beatriz Pariente-Beltran

This course introduces complex sentences and various tenses and short literary and cultural texts. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent

SPAN 204.00 Intermediate Spanish 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59309

Vera R Coleman

Through discussion of literary and cultural texts and films, as well as a review of grammar, this course aims to help students acquire greater skill and confidence in both oral and written expression. Taught three days a week in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 103 or equivalent

SPAN 205.01 Conversation and Composition 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 59310

Humberto R Huergo

A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 209.00 Radio and News in Spanish 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 10, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am
Synonym: 59311

Palmar M Alvarez-Blanco

Are you interested in talking about current news while practicing your oral skills in Spanish? Have you ever considered participating in a radio program? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with your Spanish while collaborating with “El Super Barrio Latino” a radio program conducted by the Latinx community of Northfield. In each program we will explore international and domestic news and we will interview people in our community. Relying on international newspapers, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. (Language of conversation is Spanish)

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 242.00 Introduction to Latin American Literature 6 credits

Silvia Lopez

An introductory course to reading major texts in Spanish provides an historical survey of the literary movements within Latin American literature from the pre-Hispanic to the contemporary period. Recommended as a foundation course for further study. Not open to seniors.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency

Not open to seniors

SPAN 262.00 Myth and History in Central American Literature 6 credits

Yansi Y Perez

In this course we study the relationship between myth and history in Central America since its origins in the Popol Vuh, the sacred texts of the Mayans until the period of the post-civil wars era. The course is organized in a chronological manner. We will study, in addition to the Popol Vuh, the chronicles of Alvarado, some poems by Rubén Darío and Francisco Gavidia, some of the writings of Miguel Ãngel Asturias and Salarrué. The course will end with a study of critical visions of the mythical presented by more contemporary authors such as Roque Dalton and Luis de Lión. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 370.00 Indigeneity and Gender in Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58077

Walther Maradiegue

This course will examine representations of Indigenous peoples in Latin America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with special attention to constructions of race and gender. We will explore topics such as the racial and gendered associations used to construct indigeneity, the exclusion of alternative indigenous gender subjectivities, and the double subordination indigenous women have historically experienced. Some questions we will explore are: How has indigeneity been understood in nineteenth and twentieth-century Latin America? How have nineteenth-century Latin American nations imagined and disciplined female indigeneity? What new forms of indigenous gender identities became visible during the twentieth century? The course includes materials related to Central America (Mexico, Guatemala), the Andes, and the Amazon.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

STAT 120.01 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 57873

Samuel D Ihlenfeldt

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 120.02 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
1:00pm2:10pm1:00pm2:10pm1:50pm2:50pm
Synonym: 57874

Samuel D Ihlenfeldt

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: STAT 120.WL2 (Synonym 57879)

STAT 120.03 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 57875

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: STAT 120.WL3 (Synonym 57878)

STAT 220.00 Introduction to Data Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:00am11:10am10:00am11:10am9:50am10:50am
Synonym: 58603

Katie R St. Clair

(Formerly Mathematics 285) This course will cover the computational side of data analysis, including data acquisition, management, and visualization tools. Topics may include: data scraping, clean up and manipulation, data visualization using packages such as ggplots, understanding and visualizing spatial and network data, and supervised and unsupervised classification methods. We will use the statistics software R in this course.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275)

Formerly Mathematics 285

STAT 230.00 Applied Regression Analysis 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 58604

Laura M Chihara

(Formerly Mathematics 245) A second course in statistics covering simple linear regression, multiple regression and ANOVA, and logistic regression. Exploratory graphical methods, model building and model checking techniques will be emphasized with extensive use of statistical software to analyze real-life data.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275), Psychology 200, or AP Statistics Exam score of 4 or 5.

Formerly Mathematics 245

STAT 250.00 Introduction to Statistical Inference 6 credits

Closed: Size: 28, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:30pm3:40pm2:30pm3:40pm3:10pm4:10pm
Synonym: 58606

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly Mathematics 275) Introduction to modern mathematical statistics. The mathematics underlying fundamental statistical concepts will be covered as well as applications of these ideas to real-life data. Topics include: resampling methods (permutation tests, bootstrap intervals), classical methods (parametric hypothesis tests and confidence intervals), parameter estimation, goodness-of-fit tests, regression, and Bayesian methods. The statistical package R will be used to analyze data sets.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 240 Probability (formerly Mathematics 265)

Formerly Mathematics 275

STAT 285.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:10pm
Synonym: 59415

Katie R St. Clair

(Formerly MATH 280) Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) and instructor permission

Formerly Mathematics 280

STAT 285.02 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm
Synonym: 60000

Katie R St. Clair

(Formerly MATH 280) Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) and instructor permission

Formerly Mathematics 280

STAT 330.00 Advanced Statistical Modeling 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 58611

Laura M Chihara

(Formerly MATH 345) Topics include linear mixed effects models for repeated measures, longitudinal or hierarchical data and generalized linear models (of which logistic and Poisson regression are special cases) including zero-inflated Poisson models. Depending on time, additional topics could include survival analysis, generalized additive models or models for spatial data.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 and 250 (formerly Mathematics 245 and 275) or permission of the instructor

Formerly Mathematics 345

THEA 260.00 Space, Time, Body, Minds 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:20am12:05pm10:20am12:05pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 59642

Lizbett J Benge

What is a body? What can bodies do? These questions guide our journey into the elements of space/time/body/mind as anchor points to explore contemporary performance art. We will engage feminist technoscience studies, geographies of space and place, trauma-informed care practices, intersectional women of color feminisms, and art as activism to deepen our evolving understandings of spacetimebodyminds. Students will develop performance solos in their chosen artistic mediums that take up and respond to bodies as theoretical, material, concrete, and abstract. The course is open to all students, regardless of experience level, with an interest in: movement, performance, art, community building, feminist theory, and collective creation. Assignments will include a mix of viewings, creative response sheets, journal prompts, embodied exercises, and a research-based photo essay.

THEA 270.00 Art and (Un)Freedom 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
11:30am12:40pm11:30am12:40pm11:10am12:10pm
Synonym: 59685

Lizbett J Benge

Underpinned by women of color feminisms, abolitionism, and socially engaged performance practices, this course unpacks how art is a vehicle for social change in spaces of unfreedom such as: jails, prisons, ICE facilities, detention centers, and group home facilities. Work for the class will include readings and creative reading responses, researching case studies, and reflective assignments. As a culminating project, students will create individual performance-based works informed by critical understandings of punishment, crime, enslavement, surveillance, and/or state violence.  

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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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