ENROLL Course Search

NOTE: There are some inconsistencies in the course listing data - ITS is looking into the cause.

Alternatives: For requirement lists, please refer to the current catalog. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the "Search for Classes" option in The Hub. If you have any other questions, please email registrar@carleton.edu.

Saved Courses (0)

Your search for courses for 22/FA and with code: AMSTSAP found 10 courses.

Revise Your Search New Search

AMST 100.00 Walt Whitman's New York City 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64038

Peter J Balaam

"O City / Behold me! Incarnate me as I have incarnated you!" An investigation of the burgeoning metropolitan city where the young Walter Whitman became a poet in the 1850s. Combining historical inquiry into the lives of nineteenth-century citizens of Brooklyn and Manhattan with analysis of Whitman’s varied journalistic writings and utterly original poetry, we will reconstruct how Whitman found his muse and his distinctively modern subject in the geography, demographics, markets, politics, and erotics of New York.

Held for new first year students

ENTS 210.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Colleen M Carpenter

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

HIST 126.00 African American History II 6 credits

Rebecca J Brueckmann

The transition from slavery to freedom; the post-Reconstruction erosion of civil rights and the ascendancy of Booker T. Washington; protest organizations and mass migration before and during World War I; the postwar resurgence of black nationalism; African Americans in the Great Depression and World War II; roots of the modern Civil Rights movement, and black female activism. 

HIST 205.00 American Environmental History 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Environmental concerns, conflicts, and change mark the course of American history, from the distant colonial past to our own day. This course will consider the nature of these eco-cultural developments, focusing on the complicated ways that human thought and perception, culture and society, and natural processes and biota have all combined to forge Americans' changing relationship with the natural world. Topics will include Native American subsistence strategies, Euroamerican settlement, industrialization, urbanization, consumption, and the environmental movement. As we explore these issues, one of our overarching goals will be to develop an historical context for thinking deeply about contemporary environmental dilemmas.

HIST 228.00 Civil Rights and Black Power 6 credits

Rebecca J Brueckmann

This course treats the struggle for racial justice from World War II through the 1960s. Histories, journalism, music, and visual media illustrate black and white elites and grassroots people allied in this momentous epoch that ranges from a southern integrationist vision to northern Black Power militancy. The segregationist response to black freedom completes the study.

MUSC 115.00 Listening to the Movies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64366

Brooke H McCorkle

We all watch movies, whether it’s in a theater, on television, a computer, or a smartphone. But we rarely listen to movies. This class is an introduction to film music and sound. The course begins with a module on how film music generally works within a narrative. With this foundation, the course then concentrates on the role film music and sound play in shaping our understanding of the film’ stories. Over the course of the term, students will study a variety of films and learn about theories of film music and sound. Class assignments include a terminology quiz, cue chart, and a short comparative essay. The course will culminate in a final project that may take the form of a term paper or creative project.

Extra Time Required

POSC 240.00 At the Corner of Broadway and Main Street: The Contrasting Politics of Northfield and the Twin Cities 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65446

Brian F Harrison

According to the 2020 U.S. Census, roughly 328.2 million people live in the United States. Of that population, 63% live in one of 19,500 “incorporated places,” defined as a city, town ,village, or borough with legally-prescribed limits, powers, and functions. However, three-quarters of incorporated places have fewer than 5,000 people; 42% have fewer than 500 people. In fact, only 40% of all cities have a population of 50,000 or more in 2019, yet nearly 39% of the U.S. population live in those cities. A majority of human social, political, and economic interactions now happen in urban areas (like the Twin Cities) but a significant portion of American life is experienced in smaller towns (like Northfield). Utilizing established social theories, critical thinking skills, and common research techniques, we will learn how to bolster our understanding of both rural and urban phenomena, policies, and processes, addressing topics like political, racial, and class polarization; intolerance; health care; housing, development, and zoning, and transportation. Through field visits to and speakers from both the Twin Cities and Northfield, we will chart the urban/rural political divide to provide a richer understanding of politics and policy in all corners of the United States.

POSC 273.00 Race and Politics in the U.S. 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

This course addresses race and ethnicity in U.S. politics. Following an introduction to historical, sociological, and psychological approaches to the study of race and ethnicity, we apply these approaches to understanding the ways in which racial attitudes have been structured along a number of political and policy dimensions, e.g., welfare, education, criminal justice. Students will gain an increased understanding of the multiple contexts that shape contemporary racial and ethnic politics and policies in the U.S., and will consider the role of institutional design, policy development, representation, and racial attitudes among the general U.S. public and political environment.

RELG 100.01 American Pilgrimages 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65344

Michael D McNally

Road Trip! This seminar explores religious and spiritual journeys toward sacred centers in American culture and the transformation and reorientation that often happens along the way for pilgrims of diverse American communities. Topics include Native American spatial practices in the Southwest, the figure of the "Pilgrim" in colonial New England and the invention of American origins, Marian apparitions and devotion to the Virgin of Guadalupe, African American journeys to Mecca and Africa, evangelical pilgrimages to Israel, spiritual tourism in National Parks, and the American road trip.

Held for new first year students

SOAN 252.00 Growing up in an Aging Society 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64845

Annette M Nierobisz

Both the U.S. and global populations are trending toward a world with far fewer young people than ever before. So, what does it mean to grow up in a rapidly aging society? This course explores age, aging, and its various intersections with demographic characteristics including gender, sexuality, race, and social class. We situate age and aging within the context of macro-structural, institutional, and micro-everyday realms. Some topics we will examine include: media depictions and stereotypes; interpersonal relationships and caregiving; the workplace and retirement; and both the perceptions and inevitable realities of an aging population.

Search for Courses

This data updates hourly. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the Search for Classes option in The Hub

Instructional Mode
Class Period
Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests