ENROLL Course Search

NOTE: There are some inconsistencies in the course listing data - ITS is looking into the cause.

Alternatives: For requirement lists, please refer to the current catalog. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the "Search for Classes" option in The Hub. If you have any other questions, please email registrar@carleton.edu.

Saved Courses (0)

Your search for courses for 22/FA and with code: HISTMODERN found 13 courses.

Revise Your Search New Search

EUST 100.00 Allies or Enemies? America through European Eyes 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65071

Paul Petzschmann

During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, America often served as a canvass for projecting European anxieties about economic, social and political modernization. Admiration of technological progress and political stability was combined with a pervasive anti-Americanism, which was, according to political scientist Andrei Markovits, the "lingua franca" of modern Europe. These often contradictory perceptions of the United States were crucial in the process of forming national histories and mythologies as well as a common European identity. Accordingly, this course will explore the many and often contradictory views expressed by Europe's emerging mass publics and intellectual and political elites about the United States during this period.

Held for new first year students

HIST 100.03 Exploration, Science, and Empire 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65017

Antony E Adler

This course provides an introduction to the global history of exploration. We will examine the scientific and artistic aspects of expeditions, and consider how scientific knowledge--navigation, medicinal treatments, or the collection of scientific specimens--helped make exploration, and subsequently Western colonialism, possible. We will also explore how the visual and literary representations of exotic places shaped distant audiences’ understandings of empire and of the so-called races of the world. Art and science helped form the politics of Western nationalism and expansion; this course will explore some of the ways in which their legacy remains with us today.

Held for new first year students

HIST 100.04 Gandhi, Nationalism and Colonialism in South Asia 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65549

Brendan P LaRocque

The struggle for independence from colonial rule in the Indian subcontinent involved a wide array of nationalist movements, prominently including the struggle led by M. K. Gandhi, who forged a movement centered on non-violence and civil disobedience which brought down the mighty British empire. We will study this alongside numerous other powerful nationalist currents, particularly those based on Islamic ideas and symbols. A significant part of the course will involve a historical role-playing game, Reacting to the Past: Defining a Nation, wherein students will take on roles of actual historical figures and recreate a twentieth century debate about religious identity and nation-building in the colonial context.

Held for new first year students

HIST 100.05 Unknown Latin America 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65644

Pedro F Quijada

As a region, Latin America is famous for the warmth of its people, its historic sites, and its natural wonders. At the same time, it is often treated as a periphery plagued by underdevelopment, violence, and social, economic, and political troubles. This course explores important histories of peoples, places, and events in Latin America that are not widely known yet challenge these stereotypes in fundamental ways. Through primary sources, scholarship, projects, and discussion, we will examine these histories to understand the conditions, connections, and actions that created "bright chapters" and advanced important movements, products, people, and ideas in the political, economic, social, and cultural lives of countries in the region. 

Held for new first year students

HIST 126.00 African American History II 6 credits

Rebecca J Brueckmann

The transition from slavery to freedom; the post-Reconstruction erosion of civil rights and the ascendancy of Booker T. Washington; protest organizations and mass migration before and during World War I; the postwar resurgence of black nationalism; African Americans in the Great Depression and World War II; roots of the modern Civil Rights movement, and black female activism. 

HIST 161.00 From Mughals to Mahatma Gandhi: An Introduction to Modern Indian History 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65020

Amna Khalid

An introductory survey course to familiarize students with some of the key themes and debates in the historiography of modern India. Beginning with an overview of Mughal rule in India, the main focus of the course is the colonial period. The course ends with a discussion of 1947: the hour of independence as well as the creation of two new nation-states, India and Pakistan. Topics include Oriental Despotism, colonial rule, nationalism, communalism, gender, caste and race. No prior knowledge of South Asian History required.

HIST 205.00 American Environmental History 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Environmental concerns, conflicts, and change mark the course of American history, from the distant colonial past to our own day. This course will consider the nature of these eco-cultural developments, focusing on the complicated ways that human thought and perception, culture and society, and natural processes and biota have all combined to forge Americans' changing relationship with the natural world. Topics will include Native American subsistence strategies, Euroamerican settlement, industrialization, urbanization, consumption, and the environmental movement. As we explore these issues, one of our overarching goals will be to develop an historical context for thinking deeply about contemporary environmental dilemmas.

HIST 226.00 U.S. Consumer Culture 6 credits

Annette R Igra

In the period after 1880, the growth of a mass consumer society recast issues of identity, gender, race, class, family, and political life. We will explore the development of consumer culture through such topics as advertising and mass media, the body and sexuality, consumerist politics in the labor movement, and the response to the Americanization of consumption abroad. We will read contemporary critics such as Thorstein Veblen, as well as historians engaged in weighing the possibilities of abundance against the growth of corporate power.

HIST 228.00 Civil Rights and Black Power 6 credits

Rebecca J Brueckmann

This course treats the struggle for racial justice from World War II through the 1960s. Histories, journalism, music, and visual media illustrate black and white elites and grassroots people allied in this momentous epoch that ranges from a southern integrationist vision to northern Black Power militancy. The segregationist response to black freedom completes the study.

HIST 241.00 Russia through Wars and Revolutions 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65024

Adeeb Khalid

The lands of the Russian empire underwent massive transformations in the tumultuous decades that separated the accession of Nicholas II (1894) from the death of Stalin (1953). This course will explore many of these changes, with special attention paid to the social and political impact of wars (the Russo-Japanese War, World War I, the Civil War, and the Great Patriotic War) and revolutions (of 1905 and 1917), the ideological conflicts they engendered, and the comparative historical context in which they transpired.

HIST 257.00 Chinese Capitalism: From Local to Global 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 3, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65026

Seungjoo Yoon

How did China become a global player in the market economy? This course surveys Chinese business history in the recent past focusing on the origins of industrial development in China, agrarian “involution” and famine, vernacular commercialism, and arguments about China’s economic divergence from and convergence with the rest of the world. Historical examples are drawn from enterprises that produced salt, medicine, cotton textile, machine tools, electricity, automobiles, and the iPhone. Students will pick one of them and write a historical biography of a businessperson, an economic thinker, a company, or an entrepreneurial activity (e.g., operating department stores or advertising companies).  

Extra Time Required

HIST 265.00 Central Asia in the Modern Age 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Central Asia--the region encompassing the post-Soviet states of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, and the Xinjiang region of the People's Republic of China--is often considered one of the most exotic in the world, but it has experienced all the excesses of the modern age. After a basic introduction to the long-term history of the steppe, this course will concentrate on exploring the history of the region since its conquest by the Russian and Chinese empires. We will discuss the interaction of external and local forces as we explore transformations in the realms of politics, society, culture, and religion.

HIST 320.00 The Progressive Era? 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65029

Annette R Igra

Was the Progressive Era progressive? It was a period of social reform, labor activism, and woman suffrage, but also of Jim Crow, corporate capitalism, and U.S. imperialism. These are among the topics that can be explored in research papers on this contradictory era. We will begin by reading a brief text that surveys the major subject areas and relevant historiography of the period. The course will center on the writing of a 25-30 page based on primary research, which will be read and critiqued by members of the seminar. 

Search for Courses

This data updates hourly. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the Search for Classes option in The Hub

Instructional Mode
Class Period
Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests