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Your search for courses for 22/FA and with code: SPECINTSOCTHGHT found 4 courses.

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ENGL 216.00 Milton 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64695

Timothy Raylor

Radical, heretic, and revolutionary, John Milton wrote the most influential, and perhaps the greatest, poem in the English language. We will read the major poems (Lycidas, the sonnets, Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes), a selection of the prose, and will attend to Milton's historical context, to the critical arguments over his work, and to his impact on literature and the other arts.

IDSC 251.01 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
8:00pm9:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65373

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

IDSC 251.02 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65413

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

SOAN 111.00 Introduction to Sociology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64839

Elizabeth H Trudeau

Sociology is an intellectual discipline, spanning the gap between the sciences and humanities while often (though not always) involving itself in public policy debates, social reform, and political activism. Sociologists study a startling variety of topics using qualitative and quantitative methods. Still, amidst all this diversity, sociology is centered on a set of core historical theorists (Marx/Weber/Durkheim) and research topics (race/class/gender inequality). We will explore these theoretical and empirical foundations by reading and discussing influential texts and select topics in the study of social inequality while relating them to our own experiences and understanding of the social world. 

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 111.WL0 (Synonym 64840)

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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