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Your search for courses for 22/FA and with code: WGSTADDL found 11 courses.

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CAMS 258.00 Feminist and Queer Media 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64224

Candace I Moore

The focus of this course is on spectatorship—feminist, lesbian, queer, transgender. The seminar interrogates arguments about representation and the viewer’s relationship to the moving image in terms of identification, desire, masquerade, fantasy, power, time, and embodied experience. The course first explores the founding essays of psychoanalytic feminist film theory, putting these ideas into dialogue with mainstream cinema. Second, we consider the aesthetic, narrative, and theoretical interventions posed by feminist filmmakers working in contradistinction to Hollywood. Third, “queering” contemporary media, we survey challenges and revisions to feminist film theory presented by considerations of race and ethnicity, transgender experience, and queerness.

ECON 257.00 Economics of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64609

Prathi Seneviratne

This course uses economic theory and empirical evidence to examine gender differentials in education, marriage, fertility, earnings, labor market participation, occupational choice, and household work. Trends and patterns in gender-based outcomes will be examined across time, across countries, and within socio-economic groups, using empirical evidence from both historical and recent research. The impact of government and firm policies on gender outcomes will also be examined. By the end of the course, students will be able to utilize the most common economic tools in the study of gender inequality, as well as understand their strengths and weaknesses.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ENGL 218.00 The Gothic Spirit 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64696

Jessica L Leiman

The eighteenth and early nineteenth century saw the rise of the Gothic, a genre populated by brooding hero-villains, vulnerable virgins, mad monks, ghosts, and monsters. In this course, we will examine the conventions and concerns of the Gothic, addressing its preoccupation with terror, transgression, sex, otherness, and the supernatural. As we situate this genre within its literary and historical context, we will consider its relationship to realism and Romanticism, and we will explore how it reflects the political and cultural anxieties of its age. Authors include Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, and Emily Bronte.

GWSS 212.00 Foundations of LGBTQ Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64822

Candace I Moore

This course introduces students to foundational interdisciplinary works in sexuality and gender studies, while focusing on the construction of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer identities in the United States. In exploring sexual and gender diversity throughout the term, this seminar highlights the complexity and variability of experiences of desire, identification, embodiment, self-definition, and community-building across different historical periods, and in relation to intersections of race, class, ethnicity, and other identities.

GWSS 243.07 Women's and Gender Studies in Europe Program: Situated Feminisms: Socio-Political Systems and Gender Issues Across Europe 7-8 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 64823

Iveta Jusová

This course examines the history and present of feminist and LGBTQ activisms across Western and East-Central Europe. We study the impact of the European colonial heritage on the lives of women and sexual/ethnic minorities across European communities, as well as the legacies of World War II, the Cold War, and the EU expansion into Eastern Europe. Reproductive rights, LGBTQ issues, “anti-genderism,” sex work, trafficking, and issues faced by ethnic minorities are among topics explored. These topics are addressed comparatively and historically, stressing their ‘situated’ nature and considering their divergent sociopolitical national frameworks.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the WGST Europe OCS Program required

OCS GEP GWSS Program in Europe

GWSS 244.07 Women's & Gender Studies in Europe Program: Cross-Cultural Feminist Methodologies 7-8 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 64824

Iveta Jusová

This course explores the following questions: What is the relationship between methodology and knowledge claims in feminist research? How do language and narrative help shape experience? What are the power interests involved in keeping certain knowledges marginalized/subjugated? How do questions of gender and sexuality, of ethnicity and national location, figure in these debates? We will also pay close attention to questions arising from the hegemony of English as the global language of WGS as a discipline, and will reflect on what it means to move between different linguistic communities, with each being differently situated in the global power hierarchies.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the WGST Europe OCS Program required

OCS GEP GWSS Program in Europe

GWSS 250.00 Politics of Reproductive Justice 6 credits

Meera Sehgal

Feminist mobilization around reproductive rights in the US has changed in its focus and intensity over the past 50 years. Black American and other transnational feminists have argued about the necessity of distinguishing between reproductive rights and reproductive justice. How has this argument impacted the ideology and collective-change strategies of different feminist communities mobilizing for reproductive rights? What collective-change strategies have they proposed and what obstacles have they faced? This course has a major civic engagement component that requires students to work with feminist non-profit organizations in and around Northfield or in the greater Twin Cities area.

Extra Time Required

GWSS 325.07 Women's & Gender Studies in Europe Program: Continental Feminist, Queer, Trans* Theories 7-8 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 64825

Iveta Jusová

Addressing the impact of Anglo-American influences in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, this course examines European, including East-Central European, approaches to key gender and sexuality topics. It raises questions about the transfer of feminist concepts across cultures and languages. Some of the themes explored include nationalism and gender/sexuality, gendered dimensions of Western and East-Central European racisms, the historical influence of psychoanalysis on Continental feminist theories, the implications of European feminisms in the history of colonialism, the biopolitics of gender, homonationalism, as well as Eastern European socialist/communist theories of women’s emancipation.

Prerequisite: Acceptance to WGST Europe OCS Program

OCS GEP GWSS Program

PHIL 257.00 Contemporary Issues in Feminist Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 63959

Hope C Sample

This course provides a survey of contemporary issues in feminist philosophy as well as a selection of feminist theories of gender. For the latter, we will cover intersectional theory, narrative theory, and feminist theories of embodiment, among others. For the former, we will attempt to answer the following kinds of questions in this course: How does feminism interact with nationalism? How do categories of gender, sex, sexuality, race, nationality, and class affect our willingness to attribute knowledge or epistemic authority to others? How does the application of these categories affect our awareness of the social spaces that we inhabit? How do we know our sexual orientation? What is oppression? Should gender impact custody decisions? How does the criminal justice system reinforce structures of oppression? This course will ask students to analyze feminist arguments that support diverse answers to these questions and more.

POSC 276.00 Imagination in Politics: Resisting Totalitarianism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65083

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Ideological fanaticism is on the rise today. Individuals prefer the incantation of slogans and clichés to autonomous thinking, moderation, and care for the diversity and complexity of circumstances and of human beings. The results are the inability to converse across differences and the tendency to ostracize and exclude others in the name of tribal and populist nationalism, as well as of racism. Hannah Arendt called totalitarianism this form of ideological hypnosis, which characterizes not only totalitarian political regimes, but can also colonize liberal-democracies. In this class we will read some of the works of Arendt to better understand the power of imagination to enhance critical and independent thinking and resist totalitarianism.

SPAN 244.00 Spain Today: Recent Changes through Narrative and Film 6 credits

Palmar Álvarez-Blanco

Since the death of Franco in 1975, Spain has undergone huge political, socio-economic, and cultural transformations. Changes in the traditional roles of women, the legalization of gay marriage, the decline of the Catholic church, the increase of immigrants, Catalan and Basque nationalisms, and the integration of Spain in the European Union, have all challenged the definition of a national identity. Through contemporary narrative and film, this course will examine some of these changes and how they contribute to the creation of what we call Spain today.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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