ENROLL Course Search

NOTE: There are some inconsistencies in the course listing data - ITS is looking into the cause.

Alternatives: For requirement lists, please refer to the current catalog. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the "Search for Classes" option in The Hub. If you have any other questions, please email registrar@carleton.edu.

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Your search for courses for 22/FA and with Overlay: QRE found 99 courses.

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ARCN 246.52 Archaeological Methods & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 64055

Sarah A Kennedy

As a field that is truly interdisciplinary, archaeology uses a wide range of methods to study the past. This course provides a hands-on introduction to the entire archaeological process through classroom, field, and laboratory components. Students will participate in background research concerning local places of historical or archaeological interest; landscape surveying and mapping in GIS; excavation; the recording, analysis, and interpretation of artifacts; and the publication of results. This course involves real archaeological fieldwork, and students will have an opportunity to contribute to the history of the local community while learning archaeological methods applicable all over the world.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ARCN 246.WL2 (Synonym 64056)

ASTR 110.00 Introduction to Astronomy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 48, Registered: 45, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64130

Ryan C Terrien

An introduction to current astronomy with an emphasis on how we know what we know. Topics include the solar system; the life cycles of stars; pulsars, quasars, and black holes; and the history and future fate of the universe. No mathematics background beyond high school algebra and trigonometry is assumed.

ASTR 113.00 Observational and Laboratory Astronomy 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141

MTWTHF
7:00pm10:00pm
Synonym: 64131

Valerie Fox

Theory and practice of basic techniques in observational and laboratory astronomy. Certain problems involve the use of the 16-inch and 8-inch telescopes.

Prerequisite: Astronomy 100, 110, 127, 232, 233, Physics 226, 228, 232, 233 or instructor permission

S/Cr/NC only

BIOC 301.00 Survey of Biochemistry 6 credits

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 63016

Rou-Jia Sung

This course applies the principles of chemistry to explore the molecular basis of biological processes. It provides students with a foundational knowledge of biochemistry, with an emphasis on the structure and function of biological macromolecules including nucleic acids and proteins.  Topics include enzyme catalysis and kinetics, bioenergetics, and the organization and regulation of metabolic pathways. Biology majors must also complete BIOC 311 in order for BIOC 301 to count towards the Biology major.

Prerequisite: Biology 126, Chemistry 224, Chemistry 234

Not open to students who have taken CHEM 320 or BIOL 380

BIOL 125.53 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 65378

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff, Amanda K Hund, Sarah Deel

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Sophomore Priority with two spots held for upperclass students

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL3 (Synonym 65382)

BIOL 125.54 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65379

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff, Amanda K Hund, Annie L Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Sophomore Priority with two spots held for upperclass students

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL4 (Synonym 65383)

BIOL 125.59 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65380

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff, Amanda K Hund, Annie L Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Sophomore Priority with two spots held for upperclass students

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL9 (Synonym 65384)

BIOL 125.63 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 65489

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff, Amanda K Hund, Sarah Deel

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Upperclass students waitlist on BIOL 125 WL3

Cross-listed with BIOL 125.53

BIOL 125.64 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:00pm11:10am12:00pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65490

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff, Amanda K Hund, Annie L Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Upperclass students waitlist on BIOL 125 WL4

Cross-listed with BIOL 125.54

BIOL 125.69 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65491

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff, Amanda K Hund, Annie L Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization, including genetics, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes. The active learning format of this course allows time in class to apply new concepts with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences and our introductory courses are designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background.

Upperclass students waitlist on BIOL 125 WL9

Cross-listed with BIOL 125.59

BIOL 224.00 Landscape Ecology 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64143

John L Berini

In the Anthropocene, there has been dramatic change in the distribution of species and communities across the global landscape. The primary objective of this course is to introduce the theory and practice of landscape ecology. Throughout this course, we will consider the major themes of scale and hierarchy theory, compositional analysis, fragmentation, meta-populations, and landscape metrics, all within the broad context of how landscape patterns influence ecological process.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and Biology 126 or permission of the instructor and concurrent registration in BIOL 225

Requires concurrent registration in BIOL 225

BIOL 272.00 Integrative Animal Physiology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64145

Matt S Rand

This course explores biological functions from the biochemical level to the level of the whole organism. We will start with the regulatory systems exploring the function of neural and endocrine mechanisms. We will discuss the actions of a variety of toxins as adaptive components of venoms and pharmaceutical tools in human health research. Other topics include: muscle physiology, exercise and behavior; blood pressure regulation; salt and water balance in organisms from different environments; comparative reproduction, including human reproductive development and sexuality.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 280.00 Cell Biology 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64147

Raka M Mitra

An examination of the structures and processes that underlie the life of cells, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic. Topics to be covered include methodologies used to study cells; organelles, membranes and other cellular components; protein targeting within the cell; and cellular communication and division.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and concurrent registration in Biology 281

BIOL 281 required.

BIOL 338.00 Genomics and Bioinformatics 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64164

Rika E Anderson

The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has revolutionized biology, enabling transformative breakthroughs in fields ranging from agriculture to conservation to medicine. In this course, students will gain experience with the computational and bioinformatics tools needed to analyze “big data,” including sequence searching and alignment, assembly, gene calling and annotation. Students will learn to ask and answer their own scientific questions using sequence data, and to critically assess the conclusions of other genomics and bioinformatics studies. No prior computer programming experience is required. Associated laboratory will focus on wet lab methods for DNA/RNA extraction and preparation as well as computational analysis.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and one of these upper level courses: Biology 240, Biology 321 or Biology 350; concurrent registration in Biology 339

Biology 339 required

BIOL 350.00 Evolution 6 credits

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64149

Mark McKone

Principles and history of evolutionary change in wild populations, with consideration of both microevolutionary and macroevolutionary time scales. Topics covered include causes of change in gene frequency, the nature of adaptation, constraints on evolutionary change, the evolution of genes and proteins, rates of speciation and extinction, and the major events in evolutionary history.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 360.00 Seminar: Climate Change Beneath the Waves 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Olin 106

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64150

Gail D Schwieterman

Marine climate change comprises rising temperatures, increases in the frequency and severity of hypoxia, and ocean acidification. Together, these environmental variables can have profound effects on marine life. Or not. This course will focus upon the physiological capacities of various marine species to respond to changes in the ocean's chemical and physical properties. Through discussions of the primary literature, we will explore the physiological mechanisms that will mark species as winners or losers of the anthropocene.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and one additional 200 or 300 level Biology course or instructor consent

Waitlist only, Instructor Permission Required

BIOL 365.00 Seminar: Topics in Neuroscience 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Olin 104

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64151

Fernan Jaramillo

We will focus on recent advances in neuroscience. All areas of neuroscience (cellular/molecular, developmental, systems, cognitive, and disease) will be considered. Classical or foundational papers will be used to provide background.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

Waitlist only

BIOL 370.00 Seminar: Selected Topics in Virology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64166

Debby R Walser-Kuntz

An examination of selected animal viruses. The course will focus on the most recent developments in HIV-related research, including implications for HIV-treatment and vaccines and the impact of viral infection on the immune system of the host. In addition to studying the structure and replication of particular viruses we will also discuss the current laboratory techniques used in viral research. 

Prerequisite: Biology 240 or 280.

Waitlist Only

CGSC 233.01 Laboratory in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64387

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with PSYC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Cognitive Science 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or permission of the instructor

CGSC 232 required. Cross listed with PSYC 233.

CGSC 233.02 Laboratory in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64388

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with PSYC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Cognitive Science 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or permission of the instructor

CGSC 232 required. Cross listed with PSYC 233.

CHEM 122.00 An Introduction to Chemistry 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64417

Kate A Sammons

An introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry to prepare students to enter subsequent chemistry courses (Chemistry 123 or 128). Atoms and molecules, stoichiometry, and gases will be covered in the course. Although learning through discovery-based processes, small groups, and short laboratory experimentation will occur, this is not a lab course and does not fulfill the requirements for medical school. This course assumes competence with simple algebra, but no prior chemistry experience.

Prerequisite: Students with high school chemistry should probably take Chemistry 123 or 128. (Determined by the self-administered Chemistry Placement Evaluation, Chemistry Home Page).

CHEM 123.52 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64418

Rachel E Horness

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 123.57 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64419

Rachel E Horness

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 224.54 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64420

Steven M Drew

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 224.59 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64421

Steven M Drew

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 233.52 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64422

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.54 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235 / Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64423

Joe Chihade, Kate A Sammons

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.59 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235 / Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64424

Joe Chihade, Kate A Sammons

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 301.01 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 64425

Trish A Ferrett, Chris T Calderone

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory per week and weekly discussion/problem sessions. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 233 and Mathematics 120

CHEM 301.02 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 64426

Chris T Calderone, Trish A Ferrett

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory per week and weekly discussion/problem sessions. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 233 and Mathematics 120

CHEM 301.03 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 64427

Trish A Ferrett, Chris T Calderone

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory per week and weekly discussion/problem sessions. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 233 and Mathematics 120

CHEM 301.04 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 7, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 64428

Chris T Calderone, Trish A Ferrett

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory per week and weekly discussion/problem sessions. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 233 and Mathematics 120

CHEM 343.00 Chemical Thermodynamics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64430

Will Hollingsworth

The major topic is chemical thermodynamics, including the First and Second Laws, the conditions for spontaneous change, thermochemistry, and chemical equilibrium. To showcase how chemists utilize energy concepts to solve problems, thermodynamics will be regularly applied to a number of real-world examples and scientific problems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128, Mathematics 120 or 211 and six credits from Physics courses number 131 to 165.

CS 111.01 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64250

David R Musicant

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL1 (Synonym 64252)

CS 111.02 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64249

David R Musicant

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL2 (Synonym 64253)

CS 111.03 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64251

Anya E Vostinar

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

CS 201.01 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64254

Richard Wells

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

CS 201.02 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64255

Richard Wells

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 201.WL2 (Synonym 64256)

CS 311.00 Computer Graphics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64272

Josh R Davis

Scientific simulations, movies, and video games often incorporate computer-generated images of fictitious worlds. How are these worlds represented inside a computer? How are they “photographed” to produce the images that we see? What performance constraints and design trade-offs come into play? In this course we learn the basic theory and methodology of three-dimensional computer graphics, including both triangle rasterization and ray tracing. Familiarity with vectors, matrices, and the C programming language is recommended but not required.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

DGAH 110.00 Hacking the Humanities 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

CMC 110

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64410

Austin P Mason

The digital world is infiltrating the academy and profoundly disrupting the arts and humanities, posing fundamental challenges to traditional models of university education, scholarly research, academic publication and creative production. This core course for the Digital Arts & Humanities minor introduces the key concepts, debates and technologies that shape DGAH, including text encoding, digital mapping (GIS), network analysis, data visualization, 3D imaging and basic programming languages. Students will learn to hack the humanities by making a collaborative, publishable DH project, while acquiring the skills and confidence necessary to actively participate in the digital world, both in college and beyond.

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64603

Yingtong Xie

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64604

Michael T Hemesath

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.03 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64605

Michael T Hemesath

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64606

Aaron M Swoboda

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64607

Nathan D Grawe

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64608

Jonathan M Lafky

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 257.00 Economics of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64609

Prathi Seneviratne

This course uses economic theory and empirical evidence to examine gender differentials in education, marriage, fertility, earnings, labor market participation, occupational choice, and household work. Trends and patterns in gender-based outcomes will be examined across time, across countries, and within socio-economic groups, using empirical evidence from both historical and recent research. The impact of government and firm policies on gender outcomes will also be examined. By the end of the course, students will be able to utilize the most common economic tools in the study of gender inequality, as well as understand their strengths and weaknesses.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 264.00 Health Care Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64610

Nathan D Grawe

This course will focus on the economics of medical care and how health care markets and systems work. We will consider both private health insurance markets and publicly provided social health insurance. The changes which demography, technology and the Affordable Health Care Act are bringing to health care delivery will be examined. Some time will be devoted to understanding the health care systems in other countries. This is a discussion course.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 275.00 Law and Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64614

Jenny Bourne

Legal rules and institutions influence people's behavior. By setting acceptable levels of pollution, structuring guidelines for contract negotiations, deciding who should pay for the costs of an accident, and determining punishment for crimes, courts and legislatures create incentives. How do economic considerations factor into legal rules, and how do laws affect economic output and distribution? In this class, we use court cases, experiments, and current legal controversies to explore such issues.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 282.00 The Theory of Investment Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64615

Yingtong Xie

This course provides an introduction to the main financial instruments that are used to fund economic activity. We will explore how investment products function and learn how to price a few of them. Attention will be given to the choices investors make, and should make, when allocating portfolios. Topics include bond pricing, stock pricing, option pricing, the mortgage market, hedge funds, private equity, optimal portfolios, defaults, financial intermediary capital, and investors' behavioral biases.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 329.00 Econometrics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64611

Mark T Kanazawa

This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both econometric theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Prior experience with R is strongly encouraged. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, experimental design, issues of functional specification, model overfitting and underfitting, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111, Mathematics 111 and either Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275) or instructor consent

ECON 330.00 Intermediate Price Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64612

Jenny Bourne

An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111

Extra Time Required

ECON 395.01 Advanced Topics in Housing Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 63966

Aaron M Swoboda

This course focuses on the empirical analysis of housing prices, quantities, supply, demand, and related policy. Specific areas of study include: market trends in housing prices over time and space, hedonic analysis of local amenities like schools, parks, or pollution, differential effects of housing policy, segregation, migration, and many others depending on student interests. Class time is a mix of journal article discussion, empirical lab exercises, and other individual and small group activities aimed at helping students write an independent research prospectus. Throughout, we'll pay special attention to issues of research integrity, the open science movement, and causal inference research methods.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330, and 331, or instructor permission

ECON 395.03 Advanced Topics in Economics of Inequality 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64617

Prathi Seneviratne

This seminar focuses on empirical analysis of topics in the economics of inequality. Specific areas of study depend on student interest and may include: labor markets; earnings gaps across gender, race, sexual orientation, disability, and immigrant status; labor-market discrimination; gender inequality in different countries and regions; immigration and the role of cultural transmission; and family decision-making. Class time is primarily devoted to discussion of peer-reviewed journal articles, theory and application of advanced econometric techniques, and student-led presentations.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330 and 331 or instructor permission

ENTS 210.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Colleen M Carpenter

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

ENTS 232.00 Research Methods in Environmental Studies 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64743

Mark T Kanazawa

This course covers various methodologies that are used to prosecute interdisciplinary academic research relating to the environment. Among the topics covered are: identification of a research question, methods of analysis, hypothesis testing, and effective rhetorical methods, both oral and written.

ENTS 289.00 Climate Change and Human Health 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 63877

Deborah S Gross, Tsegaye H Nega

This course will survey the relationship between climate change and human health. The course will begin by exploring the science of the Earth’s climate before turning to an exploration of topics that illuminate the intimate relationship between climate change and human health. These include short-lived climate forcers and the climate and health impact of mitigation measures, extreme heat/drought, mosquito-borne diseases, indoor air pollution/biomass combustion/cookstoves, and biodiversity conservation. Project proposals for the off-campus component will be developed. This course is part of the OCS winter break program involving two linked courses in fall and winter terms. This course is the first in the sequence, students must register for Chemistry 289 winter term.

Prerequisite: One introductory course in Biology 125 or 126, Chemistry 123 or 128, any 100-level Geology, or Physics (two five-week courses or one ten week course from 131-165)

Extra Time Required, Winter Break Ethiopia program

GEOL 125.52 Introduction to Field Geology and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 129

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 64782

Clint A Cowan

This course introduces fundamental principles of geology and geological reasoning using the geology of southern Minnesota as a guide. Weather permitting, much of the classroom and lab time will be spent outdoors at nearby sites of geological interest. Using field observations, descriptions, data-gathering and interpretation, supplemented by lab work and critical reading, students will piece together the most important elements of the long and complex geologic history of southern Minnesota. Field trips, including one or two all-day weekend trips, and laboratories included.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken another 100-level Geology course

Held for Class of 26, Extra Time Required, weekend field trips

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 125.WL2 (Synonym 64783)

GEOL 210.52 Geomorphology and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 123

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm2:00pm6:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65647

Chloé Fandel

A lab and field-focused introduction to water resources – the processes driving the water cycle, the methods used to quantify and understand the flow of water, and the relationship between humans and water. Weekly field trips to nearby locations such as streams, wellfields, caves, and water infrastructure to develop skills including streamflow measurements, water quality monitoring, pump tests, and measuring soil properties. No previous outdoor experience required.

Prerequisite: 100 level Geology course or instructor permission

GEOL 210.53 Geomorphology and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 123

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 64784

Chloé Fandel

A lab and field-focused introduction to water resources – the processes driving the water cycle, the methods used to quantify and understand the flow of water, and the relationship between humans and water. Weekly field trips to nearby locations such as streams, wellfields, caves, and water infrastructure to develop skills including streamflow measurements, water quality monitoring, pump tests, and measuring soil properties. No previous outdoor experience required.

Prerequisite: 100 level Geology course or instructor permission

HIST 257.00 Chinese Capitalism: From Local to Global 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 3, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65026

Seungjoo Yoon

How did China become a global player in the market economy? This course surveys Chinese business history in the recent past focusing on the origins of industrial development in China, agrarian “involution” and famine, vernacular commercialism, and arguments about China’s economic divergence from and convergence with the rest of the world. Historical examples are drawn from enterprises that produced salt, medicine, cotton textile, machine tools, electricity, automobiles, and the iPhone. Students will pick one of them and write a historical biography of a businessperson, an economic thinker, a company, or an entrepreneurial activity (e.g., operating department stores or advertising companies).  

Extra Time Required

IDSC 100.02 Data Visualization As Activism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65475

Lin S Winton

Data visualization (turning evidence into images) and activism have a common goal: to make the invisible more visible. How can graphs be used for activist work? Through discussion, reading, production, and reflection, this seminar will teach students how to read and think critically about graphs, produce graphs for public audiences, and consider the ethical dimensions of data access and representation. We will learn from data visualization pioneers such as W.E.B. Du Bois, who combined graphs and photographs for the 1900 Paris World's Fair to tell a complex story of the agency, sophistication, and oppression of African Americans in post-emancipation America. As we discuss the role of data viz in activism, we will learn to experiment with creating our own visual arguments; our final project will be in partnership with a local community organization. No previous experience with statistics or graphing software is necessary.

Held for new first year students Only students eligible for TRIO should select this course. If you apply to TRIO but are not admitted, you will be allowed to change your course selection. TRIO Student Support Services is a program that serves U.S. citizens and permanent residents who meet established income requirements, are first-generation in college, and/or who have a documented disability.

MATH 100.00 How Chance Changes the World 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

CMC 328

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 63939

Claudio Gómez-Gonzáles

The modern world is dominated by chance; we walk through life speaking of hopes, fears, failures, and more in the language of statistics. In this course, we will explore fundamental concepts in probability with an emphasis on computational examples, from apartment hunting to computer-generated art. We'll look at the human history of chance—especially over the 19th and 20th centuries—to think about how we got here. We'll see that, in a life of finite spacetime but infinitely complex problems, sometimes embracing randomness can be just what we need. But what is chance, how do we understand it, and why?

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in IDSC 198

Held for new first year students who are focus participants, Instructor Permission Required

MUSC 227.00 Perception and Cognition of Music 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64369

Justin M London

Covers basic issues in auditory perception and cognition with an emphasis on the perception of musical pitch, including sensory discrimination, categorical perception, roughness and dissonance, absolute pitch, and auditory streaming. Other topics to be covered include the processing of language and music, and emotional responses to music. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Music 227 and 228 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: A previous course in Music or Psychology, or instructor permission; Concurrent registration in Music 228

MUSC 228 required. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both MUSC 227 & 228 to staisfy the LS requirement.

MUSC 228.01 Perception and Cognition of Music Lab 2 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 138

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 64370

Justin M London

An introduction to the methods of experimental and observational research in music perception and cognition. Student teams will replicate/extend classic experiments in music perception, which will involve reviewing historical and current literature, creating stimuli, running experimental trials, performing statistical analyses of data, and giving a poster presentation of their results. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Music 227 and 228 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Music 227

MUSC 227 required. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both MUSC 227 & 228 to satisfy the LS requirement.

MUSC 228.02 Perception and Cognition of Music Lab 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 138

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 64371

Justin M London

An introduction to the methods of experimental and observational research in music perception and cognition. Student teams will replicate/extend classic experiments in music perception, which will involve reviewing historical and current literature, creating stimuli, running experimental trials, performing statistical analyses of data, and giving a poster presentation of their results. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Music 227 and 228 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Music 227

MUSC 227 required. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both MUSC 227 & 228 to satisfy the LS requirement.

NEUR 127.52 Foundations in Neuroscience and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121 / Hulings B04

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 64950

Eric D Hoopfer, Sarah H Meerts

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

NEUR 127.53 Foundations in Neuroscience and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121 / Hulings B04

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am2:00pm6:00pm10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64951

Eric D Hoopfer, Sarah H Meerts

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

PHYS 131.52 Introduction to Physics: Newtonian Mechanics and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65140

Evan A Rich

A traditional introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111, not open to students who have completed Physics 143, 144 or 145 at Carleton

1st 5 weeks

PHYS 131.59 Introduction to Physics: Newtonian Mechanics and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65141

Evan A Rich, Valerie Fox

A traditional introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111, not open to students who have completed Physics 143, 144 or 145 at Carleton

1st 5 weeks

PHYS 151.52 Introduction to Physics: Relativity and Particles and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65142

Valerie Fox

An introduction to principles of physics in the domain of the very small and very fast. Topics include the special theory of relativity, and selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 120 or 121 (completion or concurrent registration) and Physics 131 (completion or concurrent registration). Not open to students who have completed Physics 143 or 144 at Carleton.

2nd 5 weeks

PHYS 152.59 Introduction to Physics: Environmental Physics and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65143

Evan A Rich

An introduction to principles of physics and their application to the environment. Topics include energy and its flows, engines, energy efficiency, energy usage and conservation in vehicles and buildings, the atmosphere, and climate change. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work or field trips.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101, 111 (completion or concurrent registration) and Physics 131 (completion or concurrent registration), 143, 144 or 145

2nd 5 weeks

PHYS 228.52 Atomic and Nuclear Physics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65144

Jay D Tasson

An elementary but analytical introduction to the physics of atoms and nuclei. Topics include the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation, an introduction to quantum mechanics, the wave aspects of material particles, the structure of atoms, X-ray and optical spectra, instruments of nuclear and particle physics, nuclear structure and elementary particles. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 143, 144 or 151

PHYS 228.54 Atomic and Nuclear Physics and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65145

Jay D Tasson, Marty Baylor

An elementary but analytical introduction to the physics of atoms and nuclei. Topics include the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation, an introduction to quantum mechanics, the wave aspects of material particles, the structure of atoms, X-ray and optical spectra, instruments of nuclear and particle physics, nuclear structure and elementary particles. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 143, 144 or 151

PHYS 228.59 Atomic and Nuclear Physics and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65146

Jay D Tasson

An elementary but analytical introduction to the physics of atoms and nuclei. Topics include the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation, an introduction to quantum mechanics, the wave aspects of material particles, the structure of atoms, X-ray and optical spectra, instruments of nuclear and particle physics, nuclear structure and elementary particles. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 143, 144 or 151

PHYS 345.00 Advanced Optics 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 034

MTWTHF
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 65368

Marty Baylor

This is a laboratory course that will serve as a follow-up to Physics 344, Classical and Quantum Optics. Students will conduct a number of experiments pertaining to optical phenomena. The experiments will display effects pertaining to classical, quantum, and non-linear optics. The lab will take place once a week for four hours each session.

Prerequisite: Corequisite Physics 344 or permission of the instructor

POSC 100.00 Political Culture and Political Communication 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65468

Barbara Allen

From political actions taken by leaders, citizens, cross-border workers, and inhabitants during the pandemic to news coverage of political campaigns, global communication networks have transformed politics and challenged personal as well as political communication. This seminar examines news coverage of events in the comparative contexts of US, UK, and EU politics as well as the challenges we face in personal communication in cross– and trans-cultural communication in global and local political and social spaces.

Held for new first year students

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 204.00 How American Campaigns and Elections Work (and Don’t Work) 6 credits

Brian F Harrison

Campaigns and elections are the cornerstones of our democracy. Formally, they are the way we select our elected officials; informally they tell us a lot about the American ethos, the preferences of particular demographics, and the future direction of our country. The course will draw from scholarship in political psychology, political behavior and participation, and public opinion and will examine American campaigns and elections through three lenses: the institutional structures that guide them; the candidates and voters that participate in them; and the political scientists who study them. 

POSC 215.00 Comparative Political Communication: News Coverage of Elections 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65469

Barbara Allen

This course will focus on the major theories of political communication in election advertising and political news contexts. Our case studies will focus on recent U.S., French, and UK elections. We compare the legal and cultural contexts of election news coverage and advertising in these countries and analyze media effects on voter perceptions using political psychology studies based on research in the U.S., UK, and EU.

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65079

Greg G Marfleet

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275), AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) or Psychology 200/201 or Sociology/Anthropology 239

POSC 232.00 Political Science Lab Focus Group Analysis 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 65486

Barbara Allen

This lab offers a hands-on experience in designing and moderating a small group discussion for the purpose of observing not only attitudes, beliefs, and opinions but also dynamic social interactions as a method for getting answers to complex, dynamic social science research questions. Students will design a focus group study, learning about participant selection and recruitment; question writing and protocol design; group conversation moderation; data extraction and analysis, report writing, and overall project and data management.

2nd 5 weeks

POSC 240.00 At the Corner of Broadway and Main Street: The Contrasting Politics of Northfield and the Twin Cities 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65446

Brian F Harrison

According to the 2020 U.S. Census, roughly 328.2 million people live in the United States. Of that population, 63% live in one of 19,500 “incorporated places,” defined as a city, town ,village, or borough with legally-prescribed limits, powers, and functions. However, three-quarters of incorporated places have fewer than 5,000 people; 42% have fewer than 500 people. In fact, only 40% of all cities have a population of 50,000 or more in 2019, yet nearly 39% of the U.S. population live in those cities. A majority of human social, political, and economic interactions now happen in urban areas (like the Twin Cities) but a significant portion of American life is experienced in smaller towns (like Northfield). Utilizing established social theories, critical thinking skills, and common research techniques, we will learn how to bolster our understanding of both rural and urban phenomena, policies, and processes, addressing topics like political, racial, and class polarization; intolerance; health care; housing, development, and zoning, and transportation. Through field visits to and speakers from both the Twin Cities and Northfield, we will chart the urban/rural political divide to provide a richer understanding of politics and policy in all corners of the United States.

POSC 328.00 Foreign Policy Analysis* 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65085

Greg G Marfleet

Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended.

PSYC 110.01 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 65272

Neil S Lutsky, Julia F Strand

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 110.02 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65273

Neil S Lutsky, Julia F Strand

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 233.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 64390

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with CGSC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both to complete the LS requirement

Prerequisite: Psychology 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or instructor permission.

PSYC 232 required. Cross listed with CGSC 233.

Cross-listed with CGSC 233.01

PSYC 233.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 64391

Kathleen M Galotti

Cross-listed with CGSC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both to complete the LS requirement

Prerequisite: Psychology 232; Psychology 110, Cognitive Science 100, Cognitive Science 130 or instructor permission.

PSYC 232 required. Cross listed with CGSC 233.

Cross-listed with CGSC 233.02

RELG 152.00 Religions in Japanese Culture 6 credits

Asuka Sango

An introduction to the major religious traditions of Japan, from earliest times to the present. Combining thematic and historical approaches, this course will scrutinize both defining characteristics of, and interactions among, various religious traditions, including worship of the kami (local deities), Buddhism, shamanistic practices, Christianity, and new religious movements. We also will discuss issues crucial in the study of religion, such as the relation between religion and violence, gender, modernity, nationalism and war.

SOAN 100.01 “We’re all in this together!” Rhetorical Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64844

Annette M Nierobisz

When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged, a series of cultural messages quickly materialized in U.S. society. Statements such as, “we’re all in this together” and “the silver linings of coronavirus,” emphasized unity and gratitude while existing socio-political and generational divides were reinforced with “it’s a hoax” and “young people are spreading the virus.” What do these messages reveal about ourselves and society? This A&I seminar introduces students to the formal discipline of sociology through deconstructing rhetorical responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. We seek to understand why these cultural messages are problematic using an intellectual perspective that emphasizes “the social construction of reality.”

Held for new First Year Students

SOAN 214.00 Neighborhoods and Cities: Inequalities and Identities 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 65625

Daniel Williams

Inequalities and identities are well understood yet too often disconnected from the context of space and place. In this class, we discuss the ways that neighborhoods and cities are sites of inequality as well as identity. Neighborhoods are linked to the amount of wealth we hold; the schools we attend; the goods, services, and resources we have access to; and who our neighbors are. Neighborhoods are also spaces where identities and community are created, claimed, and contested. They can also be sites of conflict as they change through gentrification or other processes that often reflect inequalities of power, resources, and status. In this course, special attention will be paid to how race, gender and sexuality, and immigration shape inequalities and identity in neighborhoods and cities. This course will also include an academic civic engagement component, collaborating with local communities in Minnesota.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above.

SOAN 252.00 Growing up in an Aging Society 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64845

Annette M Nierobisz

Both the U.S. and global populations are trending toward a world with far fewer young people than ever before. So, what does it mean to grow up in a rapidly aging society? This course explores age, aging, and its various intersections with demographic characteristics including gender, sexuality, race, and social class. We situate age and aging within the context of macro-structural, institutional, and micro-everyday realms. Some topics we will examine include: media depictions and stereotypes; interpersonal relationships and caregiving; the workplace and retirement; and both the perceptions and inevitable realities of an aging population.

STAT 120.01 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

CMC 206

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65243

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 120.02 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65244

Claire E Kelling

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 120.03 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65245

Claire E Kelling

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 220.00 Introduction to Data Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65246

Deepak Bastola

(Formerly Mathematics 285) This course will cover the computational side of data analysis, including data acquisition, management, and visualization tools. Topics may include: data scraping, data wrangling, data visualization using packages such as ggplots, interactive graphics using tools such as Shiny, supervised and unsupervised classification methods, and understanding and visualizing spatial data. We will use the statistics software R in this course.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215), Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275)

Formerly Mathematics 285

STAT 230.00 Applied Regression Analysis 6 credits

Open: Size: 28, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65247

Adam Loy

(Formerly Mathematics 245) A second course in statistics covering simple linear regression, multiple regression and ANOVA, and logistic regression. Exploratory graphical methods, model building and model checking techniques will be emphasized with extensive use of statistical software to analyze real-life data.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215), Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275), Psychology 200, or AP Statistics Exam score of 4 or 5.

Formerly Mathematics 245

STAT 285.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

CMC 304

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65248

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 280) Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) and instructor permission

Formerly Mathematics 280

STAT 340.00 Bayesian Statistics 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

CMC 319

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65250

Adam Loy

Formerly MATH 315) An introduction to statistical inference and modeling in the Bayesian paradigm. Topics include Bayes’ Theorem, common prior and posterior distributions, hierarchical models, Markov chain Monte Carlo methods (e.g., the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and Gibbs sampler) and model adequacy and posterior predictive checks. The course uses R extensively for simulations.

Prerequisite: Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275)

Fomerly Mathematics 315

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