ENROLL Course Search

NOTE: There are some inconsistencies in the course listing data - ITS is looking into the cause.

Alternatives: For requirement lists, please refer to the current catalog. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the "Search for Classes" option in The Hub. If you have any other questions, please email registrar@carleton.edu.

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Your search for courses for 22/FA and with Curricular Exploration: AI found 37 courses.

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AMST 100.00 Walt Whitman's New York City 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64038

Peter J Balaam

"O City / Behold me! Incarnate me as I have incarnated you!" An investigation of the burgeoning metropolitan city where the young Walter Whitman became a poet in the 1850s. Combining historical inquiry into the lives of nineteenth-century citizens of Brooklyn and Manhattan with analysis of Whitman’s varied journalistic writings and utterly original poetry, we will reconstruct how Whitman found his muse and his distinctively modern subject in the geography, demographics, markets, politics, and erotics of New York.

Held for new first year students

ARTH 100.01 Art and Culture in the Gilded Age 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 140

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65443

Baird E Jarman

Staggering wealth inequality spurred by transformative technological innovation and unbridled corporate power. Political tumult fueled by backsliding civil rights legislation, disputed elections, and anti-immigrant sentiment. Culture wars. American imperialism. Such characteristics have increasingly fueled comparisons between the present day and the late-nineteenth century in the United States. The Gilded Age witnessed the flourishing of mass culture alongside the founding of many elite cultural organizations—museums, symphony halls, libraries—that still stand as preeminent civic institutions. With an occasional eye to the present, this seminar examines the art, architecture, and cultural history of the Gilded Age.

Held for new first year students

ARTH 100.02 Witches, Monsters and Demons 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 140

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65444

Jessica F Keating

Between 1300 and 1600 depictions of witches, monsters, and demons moved from the margins of medieval manuscripts and the nooks of church architecture to the center of altarpieces and heart of princely collections. Although this diabolical imagery was extremely diverse, it came from one place: the mind of the Renaissance artist. This course examines how images that came from within were devised and fashioned into works of art. It considers why fantastical imagery that showcased the artist’s imagination was so highly valued during the Renaissance--a period typically associated with the rebirth of classical antiquity. Finally, it explores the connection between illusions, visions, dreams, and other visual phenomena that highlighted the potential malfunction of the mind, and artistic creation. Some of the artists discussed include, but are not limited to, Hieronymous Bosch, Michelangelo, and Leonardo da Vinci

Held for new first year students

ASST 100.00 The Cultural Life of Plants in China 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64071

Kathleen M Ryor

This seminar will examine the role of plants have played in China from ancient times through the end of the imperial era. It will investigate the uses of different types of plants (fruits, vegetables, flowers, grasses, etc.) in such areas as medicine, food, literature, art, and landscape management. We will seek to understand the ways in which plants function across and make connection between various aspects of human activities. In addition, the course will emphasize how plants have actively helped form Chinese cultural practices and systems of meaning throughout various historical periods.

Held for new first year students

CAMS 100.00 Rock 'n' Roll in Cinema 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64221

Jay S Beck

This course is designed to explore the intersection between rock music and cinema. Taking a historical view of the evolution of the "rock film," this class examines the impact of rock music on the structural and formal aspects of narrative, documentary, and experimental films and videos. The scope of the class will run from the earliest rock films of the mid-1950s through contemporary examples in ten weekly subunits.

Held for new first year students, Extra Time Required, evening screens

CCST 100.01 Growing up Cross-Culturally 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65065

Stephanie M Cox

First-year students interested in this program should enroll in this seminar. The course is recommended but not required for the minor and it will count as one of the electives. From cradle to grave, cultural assumptions shape our own sense of who we are. This course is designed to enable American and international students to compare how their own and other societies view birth, infancy, adolescence, marriage, adulthood, and old age. Using children's books, child-rearing manuals, movies, and ethnographies, we will explore some of the assumptions in different parts of the globe about what it means to "grow up."

Held for new first year students

CCST 100.02 Cross Cultural Perspectives on Israeli and Palestinian Identity 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64586

Stacy N Beckwith

How have Jewish and Palestinian citizens of Israel shaped their senses of personal and collective identity since the early twentieth century? We will explore mental pictures of the land, one's self, and others in a selection of Israeli Jewish and Palestinian short stories, novels, and films. We will also explore some of the humanistic roots of U.S. involvement in Israeli-Palestinian relations today, particularly in the realm of American initiated bi-cultural youth camps such as Seeds of Peace. Students will enrich our class focus by introducing us to perspectives on Israel/Palestine in their home countries or elsewhere. In translation.

Held for new first year students

CLAS 100.00 Living Like a Stoic 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64402

Chico L Zimmerman

Worried about the state of the world? Could you be happier? Should you be happier? Recent research in positive psychology has established some definite ideas about what makes people happy, but most of these ideas are not new. In fact, publications on happiness often cite ancient philosophers as confirmation for many of their findings. This course will examine the ancient system of thought known as Stoicism to establish the broad principles that form its basis and will offer concrete ways to put those principles into practice in order to achieve happiness, including one mandatory week of living like a Stoic.

Held for first year students

CS 100.00 The Internet: Protocols, Platforms, and People 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Olin 304

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64002

Sneha Narayan

The internet is an essential technology that touches virtually every aspect of our lives. Since its introduction in the early 80s, it has grown widely and transformed how we work, learn, and communicate. How does this critical piece of global infrastructure work, and how is it governed? What implications did its arrival have on how we interact with one another and participate in society? In this course, we will explore topics related to the structure and origins of the internet, the legal frameworks and business models that shape how we experience it, its transformation of the public sphere, and its potential to both reduce and exacerbate inequalities.

Held for new first year students

DANC 100.00 Meaning In Motion: Reading and Writing Dance 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 165

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 63961

Judith A Howard

In this class we will look at dance through various lenses; queer/feminist, ethnographic, Africanist, disability studies, and activism. We will examine and broaden the definition of dance and situate it within the discourse of “performance,” recognizing the larger meaning of “performance” to include all bodily movements, acts and gestures, whether onstage or off. We will ask questions about the performance of culture, race, gender and ability in various dance contexts.  Researching through the body and movement as well as written and visual texts, students will develop skills of critical dance viewing, analysis, and writing through formal and informal writing assignments.  We will read, write, view, attend live performance, discuss and move.  No previous dance experience is necessary.

Held for new first year students

ENGL 100.01 Reading, Interpreting, Writing 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65442

Kofi Owusu

The texts we will read and the themes to be discussed include: the quest for home and belonging in Angelou's All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes; transitions in Obama's Dreams from My Father; difficult and essential conversations in Ta-Nehisi Coates's Between the World and Me; trauma and healing in Gyasi's Transcendent Kingdom. Our related focus on expository writing will be complemented by a final writing assignment that offers you the option to craft either a Letter to Your Younger Self on transitions, or an Autobiographical Fragment in which you trace your search for belonging.

Held for new first year students

ENGL 100.02 Imagining a Self 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64682

Jessica L Leiman

This course examines how first-person narrators present, define, defend, and construct the self. We will read an assortment of autobiographical and fictional works, focusing on the critical issues that the first-person speaker "I" raises. In particular, we will consider the risks and rewards of narrative self-exposure, the relationship between autobiography and the novel, and the apparent intimacy between first-person narrators and their readers. Authors will include James Boswell, Charlotte Bronte, Harriet Jacobs, Sylvia Plath, and Dave Eggers.

Held for new first year students

ENGL 100.03 Rhetoric: Art of Persuasion 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64683

Timothy Raylor

Rhetoric's all around us: in political manifestos and legal pleadings; in professions of love and advertisements for dog food. We use it whenever we urge someone to believe what we say or do what we want. But how well do we understand the foundations and protocols of this art that teaches us "to see the available means of persuasion?" In this class we'll study the origins and theory of rhetoric (via Aristotle), examine exemplary instances (from Pericles to Trump), and consider the charges (via Plato) that it's all lies and trickery, while learning how to compose persuasive academic papers and presentations.

Held for new first year students

ENGL 100.04 Drama, Film, and Society 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64685

Pierre Hecker

With an emphasis on critical reading, writing, and the fundamentals of college-level research, this course will develop students' knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the relationship between drama and film and the social and cultural contexts of which they are (or were) a part and product. The course explores the various ways in which these plays and movies (which might include anything and everything from Spike Lee to Tony Kushner to Christopher Marlowe) generate meaning, with particular attention to the social, historical, and political realities that contribute to that meaning. An important component of this course will be attending live performances in the Twin Cities. These required events may be during the week and/or the weekend.

Held for new first year students. Extra Time required.

ENGL 100.05 Novel, Nation, Self 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64684

Arnab Chakladar

With an emphasis on critical reading and writing in an academic context, this course will examine how contemporary writers from a range of global locations approach the question of the writing of the self and of the nation. Reading novels from both familiar and unfamiliar cultural contexts we will examine closely our practices of reading, and the cultural expectations and assumptions that underlie them.

Held for new first year students

EUST 100.00 Allies or Enemies? America through European Eyes 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65071

Paul Petzschmann

During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, America often served as a canvass for projecting European anxieties about economic, social and political modernization. Admiration of technological progress and political stability was combined with a pervasive anti-Americanism, which was, according to political scientist Andrei Markovits, the "lingua franca" of modern Europe. These often contradictory perceptions of the United States were crucial in the process of forming national histories and mythologies as well as a common European identity. Accordingly, this course will explore the many and often contradictory views expressed by Europe's emerging mass publics and intellectual and political elites about the United States during this period.

Held for new first year students

GERM 100.00 Seeking Shelter in a Dangerous World 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 63934

Seth E Peabody

Where do I feel at home? What causes me to feel not at home in certain spaces? In the face of transforming societies and environments, can a stable sense of home be preserved—and should it be? In this course, we will study texts from a wide range of geographic locations and cultural backgrounds that investigate the stakes of creating a sense of home within unfamiliar, unwelcoming, and seemingly ruined environments. Ultimately, we will seek ways to think both critically and creatively about human environments, both in cultural texts and in our own reflection on the places we call home.

Open only to new first year students

HIST 100.01 Trials in Early America 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

HASE 109

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 64828

Serena R Zabin

An enormous variety of people told stories of their lives in early America’s courtrooms. Trials from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are some of the best places for historians to learn about ordinary people and the world in which they lived. Enslaved Africans, pregnant women, wealthy men, and even transgender people were part of early American trials. Sometimes they were there to defend themselves, their lives, and their choices. Others were there as plaintiffs who tried to use the legal system to shape the world around them.  Emphasizing both history and law, this course will be based primarily on trial transcripts and other court papers from seventeenth- and eighteenth-century America.

Held for new first year students

HIST 100.02 Confucius and His Critics 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65016

Seungjoo Yoon

An introduction to the study of historical biography. Instead of what we heard or think about Confucius, we will examine what his contemporaries, both his supporters and critics, thought he was. Students will scrutinize various sources gleaned from archaeology, heroic narratives, and court debates, as well as the Analects to write their own biography of Confucius based on a particular historical context that created a persistent constitutional agenda in early China. Students will justify why they would call such a finding, in hindsight, "Confucian" in its formative days. Themes can be drawn from aspects of ritual, bureaucracy, speech and writing

Held for new first year students

HIST 100.03 Exploration, Science, and Empire 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65017

Antony E Adler

This course provides an introduction to the global history of exploration. We will examine the scientific and artistic aspects of expeditions, and consider how scientific knowledge--navigation, medicinal treatments, or the collection of scientific specimens--helped make exploration, and subsequently Western colonialism, possible. We will also explore how the visual and literary representations of exotic places shaped distant audiences’ understandings of empire and of the so-called races of the world. Art and science helped form the politics of Western nationalism and expansion; this course will explore some of the ways in which their legacy remains with us today.

Held for new first year students

HIST 100.04 Gandhi, Nationalism and Colonialism in South Asia 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65549

Brendan P LaRocque

The struggle for independence from colonial rule in the Indian subcontinent involved a wide array of nationalist movements, prominently including the struggle led by M. K. Gandhi, who forged a movement centered on non-violence and civil disobedience which brought down the mighty British empire. We will study this alongside numerous other powerful nationalist currents, particularly those based on Islamic ideas and symbols. A significant part of the course will involve a historical role-playing game, Reacting to the Past: Defining a Nation, wherein students will take on roles of actual historical figures and recreate a twentieth century debate about religious identity and nation-building in the colonial context.

Held for new first year students

HIST 100.05 Unknown Latin America 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65644

Pedro F Quijada

As a region, Latin America is famous for the warmth of its people, its historic sites, and its natural wonders. At the same time, it is often treated as a periphery plagued by underdevelopment, violence, and social, economic, and political troubles. This course explores important histories of peoples, places, and events in Latin America that are not widely known yet challenge these stereotypes in fundamental ways. Through primary sources, scholarship, projects, and discussion, we will examine these histories to understand the conditions, connections, and actions that created "bright chapters" and advanced important movements, products, people, and ideas in the political, economic, social, and cultural lives of countries in the region. 

Held for new first year students

IDSC 100.01 Games and Gaming Cultures 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133 / Hulings 316

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm6:15pm8:30pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 63938

George Cusack

In this seminar, we will use games (both by studying them and by playing them) as a lens through which we can explore all manner of fascinating questions. How do the games we play shape our culture and our communities?  What makes a game fun, engaging, addictive, boring, brutal, or banal? How can games encourage certain kinds of behavior, even after we've stopped playing them?  Could we make Carleton itself a bit better--or at least more fun--if we gamified certain aspects of life here? To aid our exploration, we’ll draw on readings from multiple genres and employ a variety of research methods to analyze games from social, textual, and design perspectives. This course will also include weekly lab sessions on Wednesday evenings (6:15-8:30PM).  Students will be required to attend at least eight out of ten lab sessions.

Held for new first year students Extra Time

IDSC 100.02 Data Visualization As Activism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65475

Lin S Winton

Data visualization (turning evidence into images) and activism have a common goal: to make the invisible more visible. How can graphs be used for activist work? Through discussion, reading, production, and reflection, this seminar will teach students how to read and think critically about graphs, produce graphs for public audiences, and consider the ethical dimensions of data access and representation. We will learn from data visualization pioneers such as W.E.B. Du Bois, who combined graphs and photographs for the 1900 Paris World's Fair to tell a complex story of the agency, sophistication, and oppression of African Americans in post-emancipation America. As we discuss the role of data viz in activism, we will learn to experiment with creating our own visual arguments; our final project will be in partnership with a local community organization. No previous experience with statistics or graphing software is necessary.

Held for new first year students Only students eligible for TRIO should select this course. If you apply to TRIO but are not admitted, you will be allowed to change your course selection. TRIO Student Support Services is a program that serves U.S. citizens and permanent residents who meet established income requirements, are first-generation in college, and/or who have a documented disability.

IDSC 100.03 Civil Discourse in a Troubled Age 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64006

William L North, Sindy L Fleming

As we listen to people discussing critical issues facing individuals, communities, countries and the planet, what do we see happening? Is communication occurring? Do the sides hear each other and seek to understand another point of view, even if in disagreement? Is the goal truth or the best policy or victory for a side? What skills, approaches, and conditions lead to genuine discussion and productive argument? How can we cultivate these as individuals and communities? This Argument and Inquiry seminar addresses these questions in both theory and practice by allowing students the opportunity to read, view, discuss, and analyze theoretical discussions and case studies drawn from the past and present on a range of controversial topics.

Held for new first year students, Extra Time Required

IDSC 100.04 Let's Talk about Race!: Exploring Race in Higher Education 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

CMC 319

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64664

Anita P Chikkatur

From Starbucks' failed "Race together" initiative to debates about Rachel Dolezal's racial identity to the Black Lives Matter movement, it is clear that race still matters in America. These incidents also demonstrate the difficulties of having discussions about race, especially across racial lines. Drawing on texts from multiple disciplines, this course will examine the history of racial categories with a particular emphasis on how race matters in higher education. This course will also incorporate readings and activities that will help students develop further their skills to have productive discussions about race, especially in the context of a small residential college. 

Held for new first year students

MATH 100.00 How Chance Changes the World 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

CMC 328

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 63939

Claudio Gómez-Gonzáles

The modern world is dominated by chance; we walk through life speaking of hopes, fears, failures, and more in the language of statistics. In this course, we will explore fundamental concepts in probability with an emphasis on computational examples, from apartment hunting to computer-generated art. We'll look at the human history of chance—especially over the 19th and 20th centuries—to think about how we got here. We'll see that, in a life of finite spacetime but infinitely complex problems, sometimes embracing randomness can be just what we need. But what is chance, how do we understand it, and why?

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in IDSC 198

Held for new first year students who are focus participants, Instructor Permission Required

MUSC 100.00 Music and Advertising 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64488

Ronald Rodman

How can music persuade us to buy that expensive iPhone, drink Coca-Cola, or wear those new Nike sneakers? This A&I seminar will focus on music and its role in advertising in the electronic media. In this class, we will explore how music is produced for advertising spots in radio, television, and the internet, and how audience reaction determines the success or failure of ads in the marketplace. As part of the class, we will create our own video ads with music. We will also cover methods of analysis and criticism of music in advertising by exploring scholarly and critical writing on music in advertising, all leading up to a final research project.

Held for new first year students

PHIL 100.01 Utopias 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm3:10pm4:20pm3:30pm4:30pm
Synonym: 65000

Anna Moltchanova

What would a perfect society look like? What ideals would it implement? What social evils would it eliminate? This course explores some famous philosophical and literary utopias, such as Plato's Republic, Thomas More's Utopia, Francis Bacon's New Atlantis, Ursula Le Guin's The Dispossessed, and others. We will also consider some nightmarish counterparts of utopias, dystopias. One of the projects in this course is a public performance, such as a speech or a short play. 

Held for new first year students

PHIL 100.02 Science, Faith and Rationality 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65001

Jason A Decker

This seminar will introduce the student to the study of philosophy through a consideration of various epistemic and metaphysical issues surrounding science and religion. What distinguishes scientific inquiry from other areas of inquiry: Its subject matter, its method of inquiry, or perhaps both? How does scientific belief differ from religious belief, in particular? Is the scientist committed to substantive metaphysical assumptions? If so, what role do these assumptions play in scientific investigation and how do they differ from religious dogma (if they do)? Our exploration of these questions will involve the consideration of both classic and contemporary philosophical texts.

Held for new first year students

PHIL 100.03 Family Values: The Ethics of Being a Family 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65002

Daniel M Groll

Everyone has a family of one kind or another. Whether you love them, hate them, or both at the same time, your family has played a huge role in making you the person you are. That fact raises all kinds of interesting philosophical questions such as: what limits should there be on how parents shape their kids' lives and values? Are there demands of justice that are in tension with the way families are "normally" constituted? What duties do parents have to their children and vice versa? And what makes a person someone else's parent or child in the first place--genetics, commitment, convention? This course will explore all these questions and more.

Held for new first year students

POSC 100.00 Political Culture and Political Communication 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65468

Barbara Allen

From political actions taken by leaders, citizens, cross-border workers, and inhabitants during the pandemic to news coverage of political campaigns, global communication networks have transformed politics and challenged personal as well as political communication. This seminar examines news coverage of events in the comparative contexts of US, UK, and EU politics as well as the challenges we face in personal communication in cross– and trans-cultural communication in global and local political and social spaces.

Held for new first year students

POSC 100.01 Science and Humanity 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 63994

Laurence D Cooper

The modern age has been characterized by the unprecedented advance of natural science and the attempt to achieve technological mastery of nature. How did this come about? What worldview does it express, and how does that worldview affect the way we live and think? We will investigate these questions by studying classic works by some of modernity's philosophic founders (including Francis Bacon, René Descartes, and Thomas Hobbes) and some of its most penetrating interpreters and critics (including Jonathan Swift and Friedrich Nietzsche).

Held for new first year students

RELG 100.01 American Pilgrimages 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65344

Michael D McNally

Road Trip! This seminar explores religious and spiritual journeys toward sacred centers in American culture and the transformation and reorientation that often happens along the way for pilgrims of diverse American communities. Topics include Native American spatial practices in the Southwest, the figure of the "Pilgrim" in colonial New England and the invention of American origins, Marian apparitions and devotion to the Virgin of Guadalupe, African American journeys to Mecca and Africa, evangelical pilgrimages to Israel, spiritual tourism in National Parks, and the American road trip.

Held for new first year students

RELG 100.02 Buddhism, Science, Society 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65550

Asuka Sango

This course will examine Buddhism’s engagement with the modern world in global and local contexts from Asia to North America. How do Buddhists draw on the resources of their tradition to change the social structures of gender, class, and race without invalidating that tradition? How do Buddhist teachings provide tools to combat and reinforce racism and violence while empowering and oppressing individuals? Do the Buddhist and scientific views of the mind agree or disagree? Can the effects of meditation be scientifically explained? In exploring these questions, students will be introduced to the multiplicity of Buddhisms.

Held for new first year students

SOAN 100.01 “We’re all in this together!” Rhetorical Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64844

Annette M Nierobisz

When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged, a series of cultural messages quickly materialized in U.S. society. Statements such as, “we’re all in this together” and “the silver linings of coronavirus,” emphasized unity and gratitude while existing socio-political and generational divides were reinforced with “it’s a hoax” and “young people are spreading the virus.” What do these messages reveal about ourselves and society? This A&I seminar introduces students to the formal discipline of sociology through deconstructing rhetorical responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. We seek to understand why these cultural messages are problematic using an intellectual perspective that emphasizes “the social construction of reality.”

Held for new First Year Students

THEA 100.00 The Power of Story 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 63967

Andrew I Carlson

From ancient myths to Pixar films, from conversations with doctors to Superbowl commercials, we understand and shape our world through story. This course teaches students the principles of dramatic storytelling through theatrical improvisation and critical analysis of plays and films that deal with the themes of power and resistance. The course is both analytical and creative. You will learn how artists structure dramatic stories to impact society while writing and performing your own stories for the class.  

Held for new first year students

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