ENROLL Course Search

NOTE: There are some inconsistencies in the course listing data - ITS is looking into the cause.

Alternatives: For requirement lists, please refer to the current catalog. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the "Search for Classes" option in The Hub. If you have any other questions, please email registrar@carleton.edu.

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Your search for courses for 22/FA and with Curricular Exploration: HI found 39 courses.

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CCST 208.00 International Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Recreation Center 226

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 65066

Luciano H Battaglini

Have you just returned from Asia, Africa, Europe, or South America? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with the culture (and, when appropriate, the language) you left behind. Relying on magazines and newspapers around the world, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. You may choose to read the press in the local language, or read English-language media about your region, meeting once each week for conversational exchange. (Language of conversation is English.)

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CHIN 252.00 The Chinese Language: A Linguistic and Cultural Survey 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 345

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64516

Lin Deng

This course offers a unique introduction to the Chinese language for anyone curious about its defining characteristics and how they shaped, impacted, or relate to certain social, political, and cultural practices and traditions in China, present and past. This course will prepare students with the knowledge to make informed judgment on common misconceptions or prejudices, by non-Chinese and Chinese speakers, concerning the Chinese language or its writing system. Students are expected to learn about some general linguistic concepts and notions in regard to structural features of human language and its relationship with mind, society, and culture through this course. No prior knowledge of Chinese or linguistics is required.

In translation

CLAS 220.00 From the Horn to Melqart’s Pillars: African Perspectives in the Ancient Mediterranean 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 63956

Jordan R Rogers

Histories of the classical world often focus on the cultures of Greece and Rome, situated on the northern shores of the Mediterranean. But what can we discover if we ‘flip’ our map of the Mediterranean, putting African perspectives on top? In this class, we will engage with the artistic, literary, and archaeological evidence left to us by the Mediterranean societies of classical Africa, as well as the ways in which these societies are depicted by Greek and Roman sources. Topics covered include ancient Egypt, the colonial “middle ground” of North Africa, and other African cultures on the Mediterranean periphery.

DANC 265.00 Performing the Orient 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136 / Weitz Center 168

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 63955

Phil S Chan

Magic carpets, glittering pagodas, harem fantasies...Orientalism dominated Europe's creative landscape and imagination since the 1700s, but what purpose did it serve? This class will explore over 300 years of "exotic" portrayals of "Orientals" on the Western ballet and opera stages, and geopolitics that impacted how we view Asian people and cultures to this day: from Genghis Khan, the Opium Wars, Chinese Exclusion, to Japanese Internment and #StopAsianHate. The course will also examine the creative process of shifting a Eurocentric work of art for a multiracial audience and provide practical frameworks for how to create art outside of your own cultural experience.

DGAH 110.00 Hacking the Humanities 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

CMC 110

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64410

Austin P Mason

The digital world is infiltrating the academy and profoundly disrupting the arts and humanities, posing fundamental challenges to traditional models of university education, scholarly research, academic publication and creative production. This core course for the Digital Arts & Humanities minor introduces the key concepts, debates and technologies that shape DGAH, including text encoding, digital mapping (GIS), network analysis, data visualization, 3D imaging and basic programming languages. Students will learn to hack the humanities by making a collaborative, publishable DH project, while acquiring the skills and confidence necessary to actively participate in the digital world, both in college and beyond.

EUST 278.07 Cross-Cultural Psychology Sem in Prague: Politics & Culture in Central Europe-Twentieth Century 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63866

Ken B Abrams

This course covers important political, social, and cultural developments in Central Europe during the twentieth century. Studies will explore the establishment of independent nations during the interwar period, Nazi occupation, resistance and collaboration, the Holocaust and the expulsion of the Germans, the nature of the communist system, its final collapse, and the post-communist transformation.

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 335

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 64758

Cathy Yandell

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 64759)

GERM 208.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 10, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
1:15pm2:25pm
Synonym: 65454

Juliane Schicker

An excellent opportunity to brush up your German while learning about current issues in German-speaking countries. Relying on magazines, newspapers, podcasts, and streamings, students will discuss common topics and themes once a week to exchange their ideas over snacks with a small group of students. 

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent

GERM 258.07 Berlin Program: Berlin Memory Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63876

Kiley Kost

Vergangenheitsbewältigung is the German word for reconciling the past; it is a process that has shaped collective memory in Germany and other European countries since the end of the Holocaust and World War II. Berlin in particular has been formed by its difficult history and memories, the traces of which are visible in the city today. In this class, we will examine the relationship between history, memory, and collective identity in Germany. How are narratives of the past preserved in the present? Which stories are told, which are left out, and who makes these decisions? How does the geography of a city interact with its history? How do memorials impact public space? In addition to analyzing fiction, essays, and visual culture, we will also confront this topic through several field trips and walks in Berlin.

Prerequisite: German 103 or equivalent and acceptance in Berlin program

Participation in OCS Berlin Program

GWSS 212.00 Foundations of LGBTQ Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64822

Candace I Moore

This course introduces students to foundational interdisciplinary works in sexuality and gender studies, while focusing on the construction of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer identities in the United States. In exploring sexual and gender diversity throughout the term, this seminar highlights the complexity and variability of experiences of desire, identification, embodiment, self-definition, and community-building across different historical periods, and in relation to intersections of race, class, ethnicity, and other identities.

GWSS 243.07 Women's and Gender Studies in Europe Program: Situated Feminisms: Socio-Political Systems and Gender Issues Across Europe 7-8 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 64823

Iveta Jusová

This course examines the history and present of feminist and LGBTQ activisms across Western and East-Central Europe. We study the impact of the European colonial heritage on the lives of women and sexual/ethnic minorities across European communities, as well as the legacies of World War II, the Cold War, and the EU expansion into Eastern Europe. Reproductive rights, LGBTQ issues, “anti-genderism,” sex work, trafficking, and issues faced by ethnic minorities are among topics explored. These topics are addressed comparatively and historically, stressing their ‘situated’ nature and considering their divergent sociopolitical national frameworks.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the WGST Europe OCS Program required

OCS GEP GWSS Program in Europe

GWSS 244.07 Women's & Gender Studies in Europe Program: Cross-Cultural Feminist Methodologies 7-8 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 64824

Iveta Jusová

This course explores the following questions: What is the relationship between methodology and knowledge claims in feminist research? How do language and narrative help shape experience? What are the power interests involved in keeping certain knowledges marginalized/subjugated? How do questions of gender and sexuality, of ethnicity and national location, figure in these debates? We will also pay close attention to questions arising from the hegemony of English as the global language of WGS as a discipline, and will reflect on what it means to move between different linguistic communities, with each being differently situated in the global power hierarchies.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the WGST Europe OCS Program required

OCS GEP GWSS Program in Europe

GWSS 325.07 Women's & Gender Studies in Europe Program: Continental Feminist, Queer, Trans* Theories 7-8 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 64825

Iveta Jusová

Addressing the impact of Anglo-American influences in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, this course examines European, including East-Central European, approaches to key gender and sexuality topics. It raises questions about the transfer of feminist concepts across cultures and languages. Some of the themes explored include nationalism and gender/sexuality, gendered dimensions of Western and East-Central European racisms, the historical influence of psychoanalysis on Continental feminist theories, the implications of European feminisms in the history of colonialism, the biopolitics of gender, homonationalism, as well as Eastern European socialist/communist theories of women’s emancipation.

Prerequisite: Acceptance to WGST Europe OCS Program

OCS GEP GWSS Program

HIST 126.00 African American History II 6 credits

Rebecca J Brueckmann

The transition from slavery to freedom; the post-Reconstruction erosion of civil rights and the ascendancy of Booker T. Washington; protest organizations and mass migration before and during World War I; the postwar resurgence of black nationalism; African Americans in the Great Depression and World War II; roots of the modern Civil Rights movement, and black female activism. 

HIST 131.00 Saints and Society in Late Antiquity 6 credits

William L North

In Late Antiquity (200-800 CE), certain men and women around the Mediterranean and beyond came to occupy a special place in the minds and lives of their contemporaries: they were known as holy men and women or saints. What led people to perceive someone as holy? What were the consequences of holiness for the persons themselves and the surrounding societies? When they intervene in their worlds, what are their sources of authority and power?  How did these holy figures relate to the established institutions--secular and religious--that surrounded them?  Working with a rich array of evidence, we will explore themes such as asceticism, embodied and verbal pedagogy, wealth and poverty, work, marginality, cultural difference, and protest/resistance. We will journey from the lands of Gaul, Italy, and Spain to North Africa and Egypt and the Holy Land, to Armenia and the Fertile Crescent.

Extra Time Required

HIST 161.00 From Mughals to Mahatma Gandhi: An Introduction to Modern Indian History 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65020

Amna Khalid

An introductory survey course to familiarize students with some of the key themes and debates in the historiography of modern India. Beginning with an overview of Mughal rule in India, the main focus of the course is the colonial period. The course ends with a discussion of 1947: the hour of independence as well as the creation of two new nation-states, India and Pakistan. Topics include Oriental Despotism, colonial rule, nationalism, communalism, gender, caste and race. No prior knowledge of South Asian History required.

HIST 205.00 American Environmental History 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Environmental concerns, conflicts, and change mark the course of American history, from the distant colonial past to our own day. This course will consider the nature of these eco-cultural developments, focusing on the complicated ways that human thought and perception, culture and society, and natural processes and biota have all combined to forge Americans' changing relationship with the natural world. Topics will include Native American subsistence strategies, Euroamerican settlement, industrialization, urbanization, consumption, and the environmental movement. As we explore these issues, one of our overarching goals will be to develop an historical context for thinking deeply about contemporary environmental dilemmas.

HIST 226.00 U.S. Consumer Culture 6 credits

Annette R Igra

In the period after 1880, the growth of a mass consumer society recast issues of identity, gender, race, class, family, and political life. We will explore the development of consumer culture through such topics as advertising and mass media, the body and sexuality, consumerist politics in the labor movement, and the response to the Americanization of consumption abroad. We will read contemporary critics such as Thorstein Veblen, as well as historians engaged in weighing the possibilities of abundance against the growth of corporate power.

HIST 228.00 Civil Rights and Black Power 6 credits

Rebecca J Brueckmann

This course treats the struggle for racial justice from World War II through the 1960s. Histories, journalism, music, and visual media illustrate black and white elites and grassroots people allied in this momentous epoch that ranges from a southern integrationist vision to northern Black Power militancy. The segregationist response to black freedom completes the study.

HIST 241.00 Russia through Wars and Revolutions 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65024

Adeeb Khalid

The lands of the Russian empire underwent massive transformations in the tumultuous decades that separated the accession of Nicholas II (1894) from the death of Stalin (1953). This course will explore many of these changes, with special attention paid to the social and political impact of wars (the Russo-Japanese War, World War I, the Civil War, and the Great Patriotic War) and revolutions (of 1905 and 1917), the ideological conflicts they engendered, and the comparative historical context in which they transpired.

HIST 246.00 Making Early Medieval England 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 63977

Austin P Mason

This course explores the world of Early Medieval England from Rome's decline through the Norman Conquest (c.400-1066) through its material culture. These six centuries witnessed dramatic transformations, including waning Roman influence, changing environmental conditions, ethnic migrations, the coming of Christianity, the rise of kingdoms, and the emergence of new agricultural and economic regimes. We will look beyond the kings and priests at the top of society by analyzing objects people made and used, buildings they built, and human remains they buried alongside primary and secondary written sources. Students will practice writing history from, and experiment with (re)making, early English "things""

HIST 257.00 Chinese Capitalism: From Local to Global 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 3, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65026

Seungjoo Yoon

How did China become a global player in the market economy? This course surveys Chinese business history in the recent past focusing on the origins of industrial development in China, agrarian “involution” and famine, vernacular commercialism, and arguments about China’s economic divergence from and convergence with the rest of the world. Historical examples are drawn from enterprises that produced salt, medicine, cotton textile, machine tools, electricity, automobiles, and the iPhone. Students will pick one of them and write a historical biography of a businessperson, an economic thinker, a company, or an entrepreneurial activity (e.g., operating department stores or advertising companies).  

Extra Time Required

HIST 265.00 Central Asia in the Modern Age 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

Central Asia--the region encompassing the post-Soviet states of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, and the Xinjiang region of the People's Republic of China--is often considered one of the most exotic in the world, but it has experienced all the excesses of the modern age. After a basic introduction to the long-term history of the steppe, this course will concentrate on exploring the history of the region since its conquest by the Russian and Chinese empires. We will discuss the interaction of external and local forces as we explore transformations in the realms of politics, society, culture, and religion.

HIST 298.00 Junior Colloquium 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65028

Amna Khalid

In the junior year, majors must take this six-credit reading and discussion course taught each year by different members of the department faculty. The course is also required for the History minor. The general purpose of History 298 is to help students reach a more sophisticated understanding of the nature of history as a discipline and of the approaches and methods of historians. A major who is considering off-campus study in the junior year should consult with their adviser on when to take History 298.

Prerequisite: At least two six credit courses in History (excluding HIST 100 and Independents) at Carleton.

Required for History majors and minors

HIST 320.00 The Progressive Era? 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65029

Annette R Igra

Was the Progressive Era progressive? It was a period of social reform, labor activism, and woman suffrage, but also of Jim Crow, corporate capitalism, and U.S. imperialism. These are among the topics that can be explored in research papers on this contradictory era. We will begin by reading a brief text that surveys the major subject areas and relevant historiography of the period. The course will center on the writing of a 25-30 page based on primary research, which will be read and critiqued by members of the seminar. 

IDSC 251.01 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
8:00pm9:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65373

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

IDSC 251.02 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65413

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

PHIL 117.00 Reclaiming Argument 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 63968

Ned Hall

Our lives are drenched in argument and persuasion. This course aims to teach you how to deftly and ethically manage argument and persuasion in your own life. Our goals: to develop your skill at recognizing how language can be used and misused as a tool for persuasion, by teaching techniques from formal logic, linguistics, and argument-mapping; and to show you how (and why) to construct your own arguments with honesty and logical transparency. Our hope is that you will come to see argument not primarily as a contest to be won or lost, but as something that should be “reclaimed” for a more noble purpose: building genuine understanding between people, even across profound differences of viewpoint.

PHIL 257.00 Contemporary Issues in Feminist Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 63959

Hope C Sample

This course provides a survey of contemporary issues in feminist philosophy as well as a selection of feminist theories of gender. For the latter, we will cover intersectional theory, narrative theory, and feminist theories of embodiment, among others. For the former, we will attempt to answer the following kinds of questions in this course: How does feminism interact with nationalism? How do categories of gender, sex, sexuality, race, nationality, and class affect our willingness to attribute knowledge or epistemic authority to others? How does the application of these categories affect our awareness of the social spaces that we inhabit? How do we know our sexual orientation? What is oppression? Should gender impact custody decisions? How does the criminal justice system reinforce structures of oppression? This course will ask students to analyze feminist arguments that support diverse answers to these questions and more.

PHIL 270.00 Ancient Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65003

Daniel M Groll

Is there a key to a happy and successful human life? If so, how do you acquire it? Ancient philosophers thought the key was virtue and that your chances of obtaining it depend on the sort of life you lead. In this course we’ll examine what these philosophers meant by virtue and how they understood its implications for your everyday life. We will situate the ancient understanding of virtue in the context of larger questions of metaphysics (the nature of being and reality), psychology, and ethics, as they arise in foundational works from Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics.

PHIL 306.00 Causation and Explanation 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 63973

Ned Hall

Intimately related in deep but philosophically mysterious ways, the paired concepts of causation and explanation structure how we think about the reality we inhabit and our place in it, as well as our self-understanding as inquirers. After all, when we investigate just about anything, we aim to know not just the where and the when, but the how and the why. This seminar will introduce you to some of the most important philosophical investigations into causation, explanation, and their relationship to one another. Along the way, we’ll pay close attention to ways in which these investigations matter--well outside the confines of academic philosophy--by looking at stubborn disputes within the social sciences about what counts as “causal” or “explanatory”.

POSC 160.00 Political Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65077

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions.

POSC 276.00 Imagination in Politics: Resisting Totalitarianism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65083

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Ideological fanaticism is on the rise today. Individuals prefer the incantation of slogans and clichés to autonomous thinking, moderation, and care for the diversity and complexity of circumstances and of human beings. The results are the inability to converse across differences and the tendency to ostracize and exclude others in the name of tribal and populist nationalism, as well as of racism. Hannah Arendt called totalitarianism this form of ideological hypnosis, which characterizes not only totalitarian political regimes, but can also colonize liberal-democracies. In this class we will read some of the works of Arendt to better understand the power of imagination to enhance critical and independent thinking and resist totalitarianism.

RELG 110.00 Understanding Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65345

Kristin C Bloomer

How can we best understand the role of religion in the world today, and how should we interpret the meaning of religious traditions--their texts and practices--in history and culture? This class takes an exciting tour through selected themes and puzzles related to the fascinating and diverse expressions of religion throughout the world. From politics and pop culture, to religious philosophies and spiritual practices, to rituals, scriptures, gender, religious authority, and more, students will explore how these issues emerge in a variety of religions, places, and historical moments in the U.S. and across the globe.

RELG 111.00 Introduction to the Qu’ran 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65569

Kambiz GhaneaBassiri

This course aims to introduce students to the Qur’an as the sacred text of Islam. It assumes no background in Islamic Studies nor does it introduce students to the religion of Islam. Rather it familiarizes students with one of the most widely read, dynamic, and influential texts in human history. Topics in the course include the history of the Qur’an and its codex, the Qur’an’s literary style and structure, its references to other religions, its commentarial tradition, and its roles and significance in Muslims’ devotional, social, and political lives.

RELG 152.00 Religions in Japanese Culture 6 credits

Asuka Sango

An introduction to the major religious traditions of Japan, from earliest times to the present. Combining thematic and historical approaches, this course will scrutinize both defining characteristics of, and interactions among, various religious traditions, including worship of the kami (local deities), Buddhism, shamanistic practices, Christianity, and new religious movements. We also will discuss issues crucial in the study of religion, such as the relation between religion and violence, gender, modernity, nationalism and war.

RELG 269.00 Food, Justice and Nonviolence: Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain Perspectives 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

HASE 109

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65558

Jonathan H Dickstein

This course introduces students to the history of the South and East Asian religious ethic of nonviolence (ahiṃsā). We will discuss nonviolence and vegetarianism in Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain traditions, including critical perspectives from inside and outside of those traditions. The course will explore the philosophical and cultural aspects of nonviolence, with a focus on its relationship to karma, self-purification, animal welfare, and food practices. We conclude by examining modern deployments of the ethic in charged discourses concerning agriculture, nationalism, environmental destruction and conservation, and social justice.

RELG 273.00 Religious Approaches to Death 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65559

Jonathan H Dickstein

As the inevitable conclusion of every human existence, our lives are profoundly shaped by death. Consequently, we are all in the process of approaching death—both our own and that of others. This course examines the stunning variety of ways in which humans have approached death and mortality throughout history and across the globe. We will (1) develop a vocabulary of human mortality and death that will allow us to (2) illuminate the structural and functional continuities/discontinuities present across human approaches to death and (3) think critically about mortality and death as we approach them in our own lives.

RELG 278.00 Semantics of Love in Sufism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65568

Kambiz GhaneaBassiri

Sufism broadly refers to a complex of devotional, literary, ethical, theological, and mystical traditions in Islam. More specifically, it refers to the activities associated with institutionalized master-disciple relationships, which define the paths through which Muslims have sought experiential knowledge of God. In both the broad and narrow sense of Sufism, love has been a prominent means of Sufi self-representation. In this course, we will explore the ideas and practices semantically associated with love in the Sufi tradition and analyze the ways in which these ideas and practices have both shaped and been shaped by individual lives, religious institutions, and socio-cultural contexts.

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