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Your search for courses for 22/FA and with Curricular Exploration: LA found 36 courses.

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ARTH 101.00 Introduction to Art History I 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64061

Jessica F Keating

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from antiquity through the "Middle Ages." The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, sacred spaces, images of the gods, imperial portraiture, and domestic decoration.

ARTH 166.00 Chinese Art and Culture 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64062

Kathleen M Ryor

This course will survey art and architecture in China from its prehistoric beginnings to the end of the nineteenth century. It will examine various types of visual art forms within their social, political and cultural contexts. Major themes that will also be explored include: the role of ritual in the production and use of art, the relationship between the court and secular elite and art, and theories about creativity and expression.

ARTH 215.07 Cross-Cultural Psychology in Prague: Czech Art and Architecture 4 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63868

Ken B Abrams

This course will examine key developments in Czech visual art and architecture from the early medieval to the contemporary periods. Slide-based lectures will be supplemented by visits to representative monuments, art collections, and museums in Prague.

Prerequisite: Participation in Cross-Cultural Psychology in Prague program

OCS Cross Cultural Psychology in Prague

ARTH 232.07 Madrid Program: Spanish Art Live 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63872

Humberto R Huergo

This course offers an introduction to Spanish art from el Greco to the present. Classes are taught in some of the finest museums and churches of Spain, including the Prado Museum, the Museo Nacional de Arte Reina Sofía, the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum, Toledo Cathedral in Toledo, and the Church of Santo Tomé.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 and approved participation in Madrid Program

OCS Madrid Program

CAMS 110.00 Introduction to Cinema and Media Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 64210

Jay S Beck

This course introduces students to the basic terms, concepts and methods used in cinema studies and helps build critical skills for analyzing films, technologies, industries, styles and genres, narrative strategies and ideologies. Students will develop skills in critical viewing and careful writing via assignments such as a short response essay, a plot segmentation, a shot breakdown, and various narrative and stylistic analysis papers. Classroom discussion focuses on applying critical concepts to a wide range of films. Requirements include two evening film screenings per week. Extra time.

Sophomore Priority. Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 110.WL0 (Synonym 64211)

CAMS 186.00 Film Genres 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64222

Carol Donelan

In this course we survey four or more Hollywood film genres, including but not limited to the Western, musical, horror film, comedy, and science-fiction film. What criteria are used to place a film in a particular genre? What role do audiences and studios play in the creation and definition of film genres? Where do genres come from? How do genres change over time? What roles do genres play in the viewing experience? What are hybrid genres and subgenres? What can genres teach us about society? Assignments aim to develop skills in critical analysis, research and writing.

Sophomore Priority Extra Time, Evening screenings

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 186.WL0 (Synonym 65592)

CAMS 211.00 Film History II 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64223

Carol Donelan

This course charts the continued rise and development of cinema 1948-1968, focusing on monuments of world cinema and their industrial, cultural, aesthetic and political contexts. Topics include postwar Hollywood, melodrama, authorship, film style, labor strikes, runaway production, censorship, communist paranoia and the blacklist, film noir, Italian neorealism, widescreen aesthetics, the French New Wave, art cinema, Fellini, Bergman, the Polish School, the Czech New Wave, Japanese and Indian cinema, political filmmaking in the Third World, and the New Hollywood Cinema. Requirements include class attendance and participation, readings, evening film screenings, and various written assignments and exams.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CAMS 258.00 Feminist and Queer Media 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64224

Candace I Moore

The focus of this course is on spectatorship—feminist, lesbian, queer, transgender. The seminar interrogates arguments about representation and the viewer’s relationship to the moving image in terms of identification, desire, masquerade, fantasy, power, time, and embodied experience. The course first explores the founding essays of psychoanalytic feminist film theory, putting these ideas into dialogue with mainstream cinema. Second, we consider the aesthetic, narrative, and theoretical interventions posed by feminist filmmakers working in contradistinction to Hollywood. Third, “queering” contemporary media, we survey challenges and revisions to feminist film theory presented by considerations of race and ethnicity, transgender experience, and queerness.

CHIN 355.00 Contemporary Chinese Short Stories 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64518

Shaohua Guo

This advanced Chinese language course focuses on contemporary short stories. The course is designed to help students enhance reading skills, expand students' mastery of advanced vocabulary, and prepare students to analyze authentic materials. The historical, cultural, and literary forces that shape these cultural works also will be examined.

Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or equivalent

ENGL 118.00 Introduction to Poetry 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64686

Constance Walker

“Poetry is the way we help give name to the nameless so it can be thought”—Audre Lorde.  In this course we will explore how poets use form, tone, sound, imagery, rhythm, and subject matter to create works of astonishing imagination, beauty, and power. In discussions, Moodle posts, and essay assignments we’ll analyze individual works by poets from Sappho to Amanda Gorman (and beyond); there will also be daily recitations of poems, since the musicality is so intrinsic to the meaning.

ENGL 137.00 Terrorism and the Novel 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Laird 007

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64693

George G Shuffelton

Novels share some key attributes with acts of terrorism. Both focus our attention on questions of plot, responsibility, and effect. Both often ask us to question how a person's character or background influences unanticipated subsequent events. Like terrorists, many novelists hope their work will draw attention to forgotten causes and influence public opinion through a combination of shock and sympathy. This course will explore a few of the many novels dedicated to terrorism, whether from the perspective of perpetrators, victims, or authorities. The reading list will include examples from Britain, America, and South Asia.  

ENGL 144.00 Shakespeare I 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64687

Pierre Hecker

A chronological survey of the whole of Shakespeare's career, covering all genres and periods, this course explores the nature of Shakespeare's genius and the scope of his art. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between literature and stagecraft ("page to stage"). By tackling the complexities of prosody, of textual transmission, and of Shakespeare's highly figurative and metaphorical language, the course will help you further develop your ability to think critically about literature. Note: Declared or prospective English majors should register for English 244.

Cross-listed with English 244

Cross-listed with ENGL 244.00

ENGL 216.00 Milton 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64695

Timothy Raylor

Radical, heretic, and revolutionary, John Milton wrote the most influential, and perhaps the greatest, poem in the English language. We will read the major poems (Lycidas, the sonnets, Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes), a selection of the prose, and will attend to Milton's historical context, to the critical arguments over his work, and to his impact on literature and the other arts.

ENGL 218.00 The Gothic Spirit 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64696

Jessica L Leiman

The eighteenth and early nineteenth century saw the rise of the Gothic, a genre populated by brooding hero-villains, vulnerable virgins, mad monks, ghosts, and monsters. In this course, we will examine the conventions and concerns of the Gothic, addressing its preoccupation with terror, transgression, sex, otherness, and the supernatural. As we situate this genre within its literary and historical context, we will consider its relationship to realism and Romanticism, and we will explore how it reflects the political and cultural anxieties of its age. Authors include Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, and Emily Bronte.

ENGL 235.00 Asian American Literature 6 credits

Nancy J Cho

This course is an introduction to major works and authors of fiction, drama, and poetry from about 1900 to the present. We will trace the development of Asian American literary traditions while exploring the rich diversity of recent voices in the field. Authors to be read include Carlos Bulosan, Sui Sin Far, Philip Kan Gotanda, Maxine Hong Kingston, Jhumpa Lahiri, Milton Murayama, Chang-rae Lee, Li-young Lee, and John Okada.

ENGL 241.00 Latinx Voices in the Age of Trump 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65495

Adriana Estill

The last few years have placed Latinx communities under siege and in the spotlight. The demands of the census and new policies around immigration mean that who counts as Latinx and why it matters has public visibility and meaning. Simultaneously, the last few years have seen an incredible growth of new literary voices and genres in the world of Latinx letters. From fictional and creative nonfiction accounts of detention camps, border crossings, and asylum court proceedings to lyrical wanderings in bilingualism to demands for greater attention to Afrolatinidad and the particular experiences of Black Latinxs--Latinx voices are rising. We will engage with current literary discussions in print, on twitter, and in literary journals as we chart the shifting, developing terrain of Latinx literatures. 

ENGL 244.00 Shakespeare I 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64690

Pierre Hecker

A chronological survey of the whole of Shakespeare's career, covering all genres and periods, this course explores the nature of Shakespeare's genius and the scope of his art. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between literature and stagecraft ("page to stage"). By tackling the complexities of prosody, of textual transmission, and of Shakespeare's highly figurative and metaphorical language, the course will help you further develop your ability to think critically about literature. Note: non-majors should register for English 144.

Cross-listed with ENGL 144

ENGL 254.00 Fictional Worlds 3 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

CMC 306

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65483

Alison Byerly

What makes the imaginary world created by a novel feel “real”?  What aspects of narrative contribute to our sense of being immersed in a coherent and convincing universe?  From the Victorians who addressed letters to Mr. Sherlock Holmes at 221B Baker Street, to fans of a Middle Earth that now encompasses multiple books and films, readers have always been drawn to narratives that create a place that seems capacious and vivid enough to enter.  In this course, we will look at world-building from the eighteenth century through the present, comparing novels to other contemporary media in order to develop an understanding of the way in which the impulse towards “realism” has shaped narrative in a variety of different forms. Works to be studied include books and stories by Daniel Defoe, A. Conan Doyle,  J.R.R. Tolkien, and Octavia Butler, as well as Villeneuve’s film of Dune.

1st 5 weeks

ENGL 295.00 Critical Methods 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64692

Peter J Balaam

Required of students majoring in English, this course explores practical and theoretical issues in literary analysis and contemporary criticism. Not open to first year students.

Prerequisite: One English Foundations course and one prior 6 credit English course

Not open to first year students.

ENGL 323.00 Romanticism and Reform 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64698

Constance Walker

Mass protests, police brutality, reactionary politicians, imprisoned journalists, widespread unemployment, and disease were all features of the Romantic era in Britain as well as our own time. We will explore how its writers brilliantly advocate for empathy, liberty, and social justice in the midst of violence and upheaval. Readings will include works by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Percy and Mary Shelley, and their contemporaries.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one other 6 credit English course

ENGL 350.00 The Postcolonial Novel: Forms and Contexts 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64699

Arnab Chakladar

Authors from the colonies and ex-colonies of England have complicated our understandings of the locations, forms and indeed the language of the contemporary English novel. This course will examine these questions and the theoretical and interpretive frames in which these writers have often been placed, and probe their place in the global marketplace (and awards stage). We will read a number of major novelists of the postcolonial era from Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and the diaspora as well as some of the central works of postcolonial literary criticism.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one additional 6 credit English course

ENGL 395.00 The Twenty-First Century Novel 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Laird 218

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64701

Kofi Owusu

This seminar focuses on fictional masterpieces published since 2005. We will map out the threads of multiple storylines and track the variety of voices and dialects in Verghese's Cutting for Stone, Adichie's Americanah, and James's A Brief History of Seven Killings. The heft and scope of these three long narratives will be complemented by shorter, but equally multilayered, ones including Danticat's Claire of the Sea Light, Selasi's Ghana Must Go, Mengestu's The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, and Diaz's The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

Prerequisite: English 295 and one 300-level English course

FREN 239.00 Banned Books 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 202

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64761

Cathy Yandell

Recent events in France have highlighted the issues of free speech and religious intolerance, among other cultural questions. Some of the most fascinating and now canonized works in French and Francophone literature were once banned because they called into question the political, religious, or moral sensibilities of the day. Even today, Francophone books deemed to be subversive are routinely censored. Through texts, graphic novels, and films by Sade, Baudelaire, Camus, Frantz Fanon, Pontecorvo, Julie Maroh, Hergé (Tintin), and others, we will explore the crucial role of forbidden works in their cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 380.00 Comics: Sequence with Consequence 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Laird 007

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 63893

Sandra E Rousseau

In the Francophone world comics are known as the ninth art, a popular, legitimate--albeit contested--art form. What then differentiates this art form from others? How do comics create meaning? How do they tell stories? What stories do they tell? In this class we will develop a multilayered approach to comics by analyzing the form and content of texts, but also by questioning the place of comics in French, Algerian, and Québecois societies. Readings will include iconic texts (Asterix, Tintin), alternative comics (by Fabcaro, Louerrad, Ziadé), theoretical pieces on bandes dessinées, and conversations with working artists.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

GERM 259.07 Berlin Program: German in Motion: Migration, Place and Displacement 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63874

Kiley Kost

How is your identity connected to a certain place? And what happens when you leave that place, either voluntarily or out of necessity? In this course, we will learn about migration in German-speaking countries by reading historical and contemporary texts and researching policies on asylum and migration. We will critically examine concepts of the nation and nationality in historical contexts, learn about artists in exile, and encounter contemporary perspectives on migration in Europe. Course activities will include several site visits in Berlin. By reading and analyzing texts by Hannah Arendt, Bertolt Brecht, Anna Seghers, Ilse Aichinger, Paul Celan, May Ayim, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Yoko Tawada, and Fatma Aydemir among many others, we will become mindful readers of different literary genres and craft thoughtful analyses on topics connected to migration.

Prerequisite: German 103 or equivalent and acceptance in Berlin program

Participation in OCS Berlin program

GERM 359.07 Berlin Program: German in Motion: Migration, Place, and Displacement 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63875

Kiley Kost

How is your identity connected to a certain place? And what happens when you leave that place, either voluntarily or out of necessity? In this course, we will learn about migration in German-speaking countries by reading historical and contemporary texts and researching policies on asylum and migration. We will critically examine concepts of the nation and nationality in historical contexts, learn about artists in exile, and encounter contemporary perspectives on migration in Europe. Course activities will include several site visits in Berlin. By reading and analyzing texts by Hannah Arendt, Bertolt Brecht, Anna Seghers, Ilse Aichinger, Paul Celan, May Ayim, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Yoko Tawada, and Fatma Aydemir among many others, we will become mindful readers of different literary genres and craft thoughtful analyses on topics connected to migration.

Prerequisite: German 103 or equivalent and acceptance in Berlin Program

Participation in OCS Berlin Program

JAPN 249.00 Introduction to Contemporary Japan and Literature 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Olin 106

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64489

Chie Tokuyama

This course provides an introduction to contemporary Japan through a variety of literary works dating from the early postwar period (1945) to the present. While becoming familiar with prize-winning Japanese writers, literary genres, and various artistic conventions, we will examine how writers reacted to, shaped, and critiqued historical events and social situations in which these literary texts are written. Topics for discussion include: war memory, postwar economic success, loss of national identity, shifting concepts of families, gender roles, and lifestyles, minorities, alienation, and disaster. Through readings, lectures, and discussions, you will become familiar with major cultural and historical movements that comprise the complexity of contemporary Japan, and develop the critical skills necessary to analyze literary texts. All readings are in English, and no background knowledge of Japan is required.

In translation

JAPN 344.00 Japan Trends: Lifestyle, Society, and Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 205

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64490

Chie Tokuyama

In this advanced Japanese language course, we will explore a wide range of concepts, social media buzzwords, and cultural phenomena that constitute the fabric of everyday life in Japan today. From “geeks” and “idols” dominating the cultural scene to the “working poor” and “hikikomori,” who represent the precarity Japan faces in the contexts of economic, political and psychological crisis, the course delves into the aspects of key phenomena surrounding contemporary Japanese society. You will develop skills to read, analyze, summarize, and critique various texts written in Japanese, including newspaper articles, scholarly essays, literary texts, and films, while becoming familiar with historical contexts in which these keywords emerged and are used.

Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or equivalent

MUSC 111.00 Music and Storytelling 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64016

Brooke H McCorkle

Western music, especially classical music, is often called a “dead” genre. Part of this has to do with its associations with wealth, its aging audience base, and its seeming loftiness. But is this music really dead? In this class we will explore the history of Western music, with classical music as a starting point, but will examine the numerous ways music functions throughout cultures to tell different kinds of stories. We work from the assumption that no music (or art in general) is apolitical; because of this it behooves us to examine the ways the music of the past is deployed in service of social and political values today, whether it is to convince us to buy pizza or to incite revolution.

MUSC 115.00 Listening to the Movies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64366

Brooke H McCorkle

We all watch movies, whether it’s in a theater, on television, a computer, or a smartphone. But we rarely listen to movies. This class is an introduction to film music and sound. The course begins with a module on how film music generally works within a narrative. With this foundation, the course then concentrates on the role film music and sound play in shaping our understanding of the film’ stories. Over the course of the term, students will study a variety of films and learn about theories of film music and sound. Class assignments include a terminology quiz, cue chart, and a short comparative essay. The course will culminate in a final project that may take the form of a term paper or creative project.

Extra Time Required

RUSS 331.00 The Wonderful World of Russian Animation 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 242

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 63944

Anna M Dotlibova

Beginning in the 1910’s, Russian and then the Soviet Union was home to some of the most creative and innovative animated films in the world. In this course we will examine selected animated shorts in the context of Russian history and culture. Topics to be considered include the roots of animated film in the folk tale, the role of cartoons in educating the model Soviet child, the language of Soviet colonial discourse, and the ways in which post-Soviet animated films perpetuated or subverted past traditions. 

Prerequisite: Russian 205 or consent of the instructor

SPAN 208.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 10, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64967

Silvia López

An excellent opportunity to brush up your Spanish while learning about current issues in Spain and Latin America. The class meets only once a week for an hour. Class requirements include reading specific sections of Spain's leading newspaper, El País, everyday on the internet (El País), and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students like yourself.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 244.00 Spain Today: Recent Changes through Narrative and Film 6 credits

Palmar Álvarez-Blanco

Since the death of Franco in 1975, Spain has undergone huge political, socio-economic, and cultural transformations. Changes in the traditional roles of women, the legalization of gay marriage, the decline of the Catholic church, the increase of immigrants, Catalan and Basque nationalisms, and the integration of Spain in the European Union, have all challenged the definition of a national identity. Through contemporary narrative and film, this course will examine some of these changes and how they contribute to the creation of what we call Spain today.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 330.00 The Invention of the Modern Novel: Cervantes' Don Quijote 6 credits

Jorge Brioso

Among other things, Don Quijote is a "remake," an adaptation of several literary models popular at the time the picaresque novel, the chivalry novel, the sentimental novel, the Byzantine novel, the Italian novella, etc. This course will examine the ways in which Cervantes transformed these models to create what is considered by many the first "modern" novel in European history.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

SPAN 349.07 Madrid Program: Theory and Practice of Urban Life 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63870

Humberto R Huergo

More than a study of the image of Madrid in Spanish literature, this course examines the actual experience of living in a cosmopolitan city through a variety of disciplines, including Urban Studies, Geography, Architecture, Sociology, and Spanish poetry and fiction. Special attention will be given to imaginative walking and counter-tourist tactics as theorized by Phil Smith and the British psychogeographic movement.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

Participation in Carleton OCS Madrid Program

THEA 225.00 Theater History and Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65188

Andrew I Carlson

Throughout history, theatrical performance has been both a reflection of cultural values and a platform for envisioning social change. In this course, students will examine many of the traditions that inform contemporary understandings of theatre, including Greek tragedy, commedia dell’arte, Japanese Noh, Sanskrit drama, Realism, Brechtian theatre, and the Theatre of the Oppressed. Students will also study the history of theatre in the United States by examining blackface minstrel performance, African American drama, and the role of theatre in the social movements of the twentieth century. Class sessions will combine lecture, discussion, embodied exercises, and performance of historical texts.

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