ENROLL Course Search

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Your search for courses for 22/FA and with Curricular Exploration: SI found 57 courses.

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CGSC 130.00 What Minds Are What They Do: An Introduction to Cognitive Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64384

Jason A Decker

An interdisciplinary examination of issues concerning the mind and mental phenomena. The course will draw on work from diverse fields such as artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, and neuroscience. Topics to be discussed include: the mind-body problem, embodied cognition, perception, representation, reasoning, and learning.

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64603

Yingtong Xie

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64604

Michael T Hemesath

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.03 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64605

Michael T Hemesath

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64606

Aaron M Swoboda

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64607

Nathan D Grawe

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 64608

Jonathan M Lafky

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 257.00 Economics of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64609

Prathi Seneviratne

This course uses economic theory and empirical evidence to examine gender differentials in education, marriage, fertility, earnings, labor market participation, occupational choice, and household work. Trends and patterns in gender-based outcomes will be examined across time, across countries, and within socio-economic groups, using empirical evidence from both historical and recent research. The impact of government and firm policies on gender outcomes will also be examined. By the end of the course, students will be able to utilize the most common economic tools in the study of gender inequality, as well as understand their strengths and weaknesses.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 264.00 Health Care Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 64610

Nathan D Grawe

This course will focus on the economics of medical care and how health care markets and systems work. We will consider both private health insurance markets and publicly provided social health insurance. The changes which demography, technology and the Affordable Health Care Act are bringing to health care delivery will be examined. Some time will be devoted to understanding the health care systems in other countries. This is a discussion course.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 275.00 Law and Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64614

Jenny Bourne

Legal rules and institutions influence people's behavior. By setting acceptable levels of pollution, structuring guidelines for contract negotiations, deciding who should pay for the costs of an accident, and determining punishment for crimes, courts and legislatures create incentives. How do economic considerations factor into legal rules, and how do laws affect economic output and distribution? In this class, we use court cases, experiments, and current legal controversies to explore such issues.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 282.00 The Theory of Investment Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64615

Yingtong Xie

This course provides an introduction to the main financial instruments that are used to fund economic activity. We will explore how investment products function and learn how to price a few of them. Attention will be given to the choices investors make, and should make, when allocating portfolios. Topics include bond pricing, stock pricing, option pricing, the mortgage market, hedge funds, private equity, optimal portfolios, defaults, financial intermediary capital, and investors' behavioral biases.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 329.00 Econometrics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64611

Mark T Kanazawa

This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both econometric theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Prior experience with R is strongly encouraged. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, experimental design, issues of functional specification, model overfitting and underfitting, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111, Mathematics 111 and either Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275) or instructor consent

ECON 330.00 Intermediate Price Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 64612

Jenny Bourne

An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111

Extra Time Required

ECON 395.01 Advanced Topics in Housing Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 63966

Aaron M Swoboda

This course focuses on the empirical analysis of housing prices, quantities, supply, demand, and related policy. Specific areas of study include: market trends in housing prices over time and space, hedonic analysis of local amenities like schools, parks, or pollution, differential effects of housing policy, segregation, migration, and many others depending on student interests. Class time is a mix of journal article discussion, empirical lab exercises, and other individual and small group activities aimed at helping students write an independent research prospectus. Throughout, we'll pay special attention to issues of research integrity, the open science movement, and causal inference research methods.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330, and 331, or instructor permission

ECON 395.02 Advanced Topics in Macroeconomics and Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64616

Victor Almeida

The seminar will explore contemporary approaches to the analysis of the macroeconomy and financial markets. Topics include tests of canonical, micro-founded models of household, investor, and firm behavior; the analysis of business cycles and the dynamic response of the macroeconomy to exogenous shocks; proximate and fundamental theories of long-run growth across countries; and the design and effects of stabilization policies. Students will also be exposed to empirical methods suited for the causal analysis of cross-sectional, time series, and panel data.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330 and 331 or instructor permission

ECON 395.03 Advanced Topics in Economics of Inequality 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64617

Prathi Seneviratne

This seminar focuses on empirical analysis of topics in the economics of inequality. Specific areas of study depend on student interest and may include: labor markets; earnings gaps across gender, race, sexual orientation, disability, and immigrant status; labor-market discrimination; gender inequality in different countries and regions; immigration and the role of cultural transmission; and family decision-making. Class time is primarily devoted to discussion of peer-reviewed journal articles, theory and application of advanced econometric techniques, and student-led presentations.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330 and 331 or instructor permission

EDUC 110.00 Introduction to Educational Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64662

Jeff A Snyder

This course will focus on education as a multidisciplinary field of study. We will explore the meanings of education within individual lives and institutional contexts, learn to critically examine the assumptions that writers, psychologists, sociologists and philosophers bring to the study of education, and read texts from a variety of disciplines. What has "education" meant in the past? What does "education" mean in contemporary American society? What might "education" mean to people with differing circumstances and perspectives? And what should "education" mean in the future? Open only to first-and second-year students.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: EDUC 110.WL0 (Synonym 64663)

EDUC 234.00 Educational Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64660

Deborah Appleman

Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools. Three hours outside of class per week are devoted to observing learning activities in public school elementary and secondary classrooms and working with students.

Extra Time required.

EDUC 340.00 Race, Immigration, and Schools 6 credits

Anita P Chikkatur

This course explores the important role that public schools have played in the American national imagination as the way to socialize students about what it means to be American and to prepare them to participate as citizens in a democracy. Focusing on two periods of high rates of immigration into the United States (1890-1920 and 1965-present), the course examines how public schools have attempted to Americanize newly arrived immigrant children as well as to socialize racial minority children into the American mainstream. While most of the readings will focus on urban schools, the course will also consider the growing immigrant populations in rural schools through readings and applied academic civic engagement projects.

Prerequisite: 100 or 200-level Educational Studies course or instructor permission

Extra Time Requied.

ENTS 210.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Colleen M Carpenter

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

ENTS 250.00 Food, Forests & Resilence 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 63879

Daniel Hernández, Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

The course will explore how the idea of sustainability is complicated when evaluated through a socio-ecological framework that combines anthropology and ecology. To highlight this complexity, the course is designed to provide a comparative framework to understand and analyze sustainable socio-ecological propositions in Minnesota and Oaxaca. Key conceptual areas explored include: coupled human-natural systems, resilience (ecological and cultural), self-determination, and social justice across stakeholders. The course includes a series of fieldtrips to nearby projects of interest. This course is part of the OCS winter break Oaxaca program, involving two linked courses in fall and winter terms. This class is the first class in the sequence.

Prerequisite: One of the following is recommended: Environmental Studies 110, Sociology/Anthropology 110, Sociology/Anthropology 250, Biology 210, History 170 or History 205

Winter Break Program in Oaxaca Mexico

ENTS 289.00 Climate Change and Human Health 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 63877

Deborah S Gross, Tsegaye H Nega

This course will survey the relationship between climate change and human health. The course will begin by exploring the science of the Earth’s climate before turning to an exploration of topics that illuminate the intimate relationship between climate change and human health. These include short-lived climate forcers and the climate and health impact of mitigation measures, extreme heat/drought, mosquito-borne diseases, indoor air pollution/biomass combustion/cookstoves, and biodiversity conservation. Project proposals for the off-campus component will be developed. This course is part of the OCS winter break program involving two linked courses in fall and winter terms. This course is the first in the sequence, students must register for Chemistry 289 winter term.

Prerequisite: One introductory course in Biology 125 or 126, Chemistry 123 or 128, any 100-level Geology, or Physics (two five-week courses or one ten week course from 131-165)

Extra Time Required, Winter Break Ethiopia program

ENTS 395.00 Senior Seminar 3 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64744

Mark T Kanazawa

This seminar will focus on preparing Environmental Studies majors to undertake the senior comprehensive exercise. The seminar will be organized around a topic to-be-determined and will involve intensive discussion and the preparation of a detailed research proposal for the comps experience. The course is required for all Environmental Studies majors choosing the group comps option.

Prerequisite: Completion of all other Environmental Studies core courses except comps

GWSS 250.00 Politics of Reproductive Justice 6 credits

Meera Sehgal

Feminist mobilization around reproductive rights in the US has changed in its focus and intensity over the past 50 years. Black American and other transnational feminists have argued about the necessity of distinguishing between reproductive rights and reproductive justice. How has this argument impacted the ideology and collective-change strategies of different feminist communities mobilizing for reproductive rights? What collective-change strategies have they proposed and what obstacles have they faced? This course has a major civic engagement component that requires students to work with feminist non-profit organizations in and around Northfield or in the greater Twin Cities area.

Extra Time Required

LING 150.00 From Esperanto to Dothraki: The Linguistics of Invented Languages 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64574

Jenna T Conklin

What lies behind the human urge to construct new languages? How has language invention changed over time? What can invented languages teach us about the function of natural languages and their syntactic, morphological, and phonological structure? In this course, students will dive into the history of invented languages, tackle the question of what constitutes a language, and ultimately try their hand at constructing their own language. We’ll explore what separates natural languages from invented ones and discuss how often the very qualities that their creators find most desirable inhibit the widespread adoption they envision for their languages.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: LING 150.WL0 (Synonym 65479)

LTAM 300.00 Issues in Latin American Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:35pm1:50pm3:35pm
Synonym: 64568

Silvia López

This is an advanced multidisciplinary research seminar on contemporary Latin America. New forms of political populism, indigenous understanding of the relationship between human and non-human forms of being, transformative urbanistic solutions at work in its largest cities, the political economy of migration, and vibrant cultures of protest, will be among our topics of study. Ideal for students going to or returning from study abroad in Latin America. Required course for minors and majors in Latin American Studies.

Prerequisite: Latin American Studies gateway course

PE 348.00 Contemporary Issues in Athletics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Recreation Center 226

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 63981

Luciano H Battaglini

An examination of athletics and their relationship to society. This course focuses on the emergence of contemporary sport and the current issues facing participants, coaches, administrators, and spectators. A special emphasis is placed on understanding the motivating factors behind sport and developing a philosophy of sport that will help students evaluate current sporting issues in society.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65074

Huan Gao

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 65075)

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65078

Tun Myint

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 204.00 How American Campaigns and Elections Work (and Don’t Work) 6 credits

Brian F Harrison

Campaigns and elections are the cornerstones of our democracy. Formally, they are the way we select our elected officials; informally they tell us a lot about the American ethos, the preferences of particular demographics, and the future direction of our country. The course will draw from scholarship in political psychology, political behavior and participation, and public opinion and will examine American campaigns and elections through three lenses: the institutional structures that guide them; the candidates and voters that participate in them; and the political scientists who study them. 

POSC 215.00 Comparative Political Communication: News Coverage of Elections 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65469

Barbara Allen

This course will focus on the major theories of political communication in election advertising and political news contexts. Our case studies will focus on recent U.S., French, and UK elections. We compare the legal and cultural contexts of election news coverage and advertising in these countries and analyze media effects on voter perceptions using political psychology studies based on research in the U.S., UK, and EU.

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65079

Greg G Marfleet

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275), AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) or Psychology 200/201 or Sociology/Anthropology 239

POSC 232.00 Political Science Lab Focus Group Analysis 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 65486

Barbara Allen

This lab offers a hands-on experience in designing and moderating a small group discussion for the purpose of observing not only attitudes, beliefs, and opinions but also dynamic social interactions as a method for getting answers to complex, dynamic social science research questions. Students will design a focus group study, learning about participant selection and recruitment; question writing and protocol design; group conversation moderation; data extraction and analysis, report writing, and overall project and data management.

2nd 5 weeks

POSC 240.00 At the Corner of Broadway and Main Street: The Contrasting Politics of Northfield and the Twin Cities 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65446

Brian F Harrison

According to the 2020 U.S. Census, roughly 328.2 million people live in the United States. Of that population, 63% live in one of 19,500 “incorporated places,” defined as a city, town ,village, or borough with legally-prescribed limits, powers, and functions. However, three-quarters of incorporated places have fewer than 5,000 people; 42% have fewer than 500 people. In fact, only 40% of all cities have a population of 50,000 or more in 2019, yet nearly 39% of the U.S. population live in those cities. A majority of human social, political, and economic interactions now happen in urban areas (like the Twin Cities) but a significant portion of American life is experienced in smaller towns (like Northfield). Utilizing established social theories, critical thinking skills, and common research techniques, we will learn how to bolster our understanding of both rural and urban phenomena, policies, and processes, addressing topics like political, racial, and class polarization; intolerance; health care; housing, development, and zoning, and transportation. Through field visits to and speakers from both the Twin Cities and Northfield, we will chart the urban/rural political divide to provide a richer understanding of politics and policy in all corners of the United States.

POSC 253.00 Welfare Capitalisms in Post-War Europe 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65570

Paul Petzschmann

In this course students will explore the different kinds of welfare states that exist in Europe, the political economic and social conditions that made them possible and the debates about their strengths, weaknesses and prospects. We will review the so-called “varieties of capitalism” literature along with key welfare policies such as social insurance, health care, education, unemployment insurance, family and income support, and pensions. Welfare states use combinations of these policies differently to insure citizens against “old” and “new” risks. Finally, the course looks at how welfare regimes have responded of migration, financial, and public health crises.

POSC 264.00 Politics of Contemporary China 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65081

Huan Gao

This course examines the political, social, and economic transformation of China over the past century. Though contemporary issues are at the heart of the course, students will delve into an entire century of changes and upheaval to understand the roots of current affairs in China. Particular emphasis will be placed on state-building and how this has changed state-society relations at the grassroots. Students will also explore how the Chinese Communist Party has survived and even thrived while many other Communist regimes have fallen and assess the relationship between economic development and democratization.

POSC 273.00 Race and Politics in the U.S. 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

This course addresses race and ethnicity in U.S. politics. Following an introduction to historical, sociological, and psychological approaches to the study of race and ethnicity, we apply these approaches to understanding the ways in which racial attitudes have been structured along a number of political and policy dimensions, e.g., welfare, education, criminal justice. Students will gain an increased understanding of the multiple contexts that shape contemporary racial and ethnic politics and policies in the U.S., and will consider the role of institutional design, policy development, representation, and racial attitudes among the general U.S. public and political environment.

POSC 285.00 The U.S. Intelligence Community 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 65554

Jon R Olson

This course covers the U.S. Intelligence Community, how intelligence supports national security policy development, and how intelligence is applied to execute strategy in pursuit of policy objectives (specifically, implementation of national security and foreign policy initiatives). Studying the structure, processes, procedures, oversight, and capabilities of the Intelligence Community will enhance understanding of how intelligence supported or failed policymakers in national security decision-making, including the areas of diplomatic and economic cooperation and engagement, and security challenges ranging from deterrence to conventional war. The course concludes with the study of asymmetric/hybrid warfare in our modern age and how intelligence might be used to better understand the changing dynamics of future global conflict.

POSC 313.00 Legal Issues in Higher Education 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

HASE 109

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 63888

Steven G Poskanzer

This seminar will explore pressing legal and policy issues facing American colleges and universities. The course will address the ways core academic values (e.g., academic freedom; the creation and maintenance of a community based on shared values) fit or conflict with legal rules and political dynamics that operate beyond the academy. Likely topics include how college admissions are shaped by legal principles, with particular emphasis on debates over affirmative action; on-campus speech; faculty tenure; intellectual property; student rights and student discipline (including discipline for sexual assault); and college and university relations with the outside world.

POSC 328.00 Foreign Policy Analysis* 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65085

Greg G Marfleet

Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended.

POSC 358.00 Comparative Social Movements* 6 credits

Dev Gupta

This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. The first part of the course will critically review the major theories that have been developed to explain how social movements form, operate and seek to influence politics at both the domestic and international levels. In the second part of the course, these theoretical approaches will be used to explore a number of case studies involving social movements that span several different issue areas and political regions. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe.

Extra Time Required

PSYC 110.01 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 65272

Neil S Lutsky, Julia F Strand

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 110.02 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65273

Neil S Lutsky, Julia F Strand

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 110.03 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65320

Julie J Neiworth

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 246.00 Human Sexuality 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 63899

Mitchell R Campbell

Humans are a sexual animal. Not only do we engage in sexual behavior for procreation, but also at times for pleasure, intimacy, affiliation, and profit. Furthermore, we maintain sexual and gender identities that affect our behaviors and help us organize our social worlds. These identities develop over time, through our childhood and adolescence and into adulthood. We also place boundaries on sexuality and gender through norms, laws, and social conventions. Sexuality is at once commonplace and private, ubiquitous yet taboo. In this course, we will explore the many dimensions and paradoxes of human sexuality and its connection to our psychology. We will also consider these topics in the context of real-world phenomena and cross-cultural examples.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor consent

PSYC 251.00 Lifespan Development 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65319

Emily A Hazlett

This course explores the concepts, theories, and research on human development as it occurs over the lifespan and across contexts. We will learn about physical, cognitive, and psychosocial developmental milestones and challenges unique to each stage of human development. This exploration “from womb to tomb” includes infancy, early and middle childhood, adolescence, emerging adulthood, adulthood, and old age. Through readings, class discussions, and group and individual activities, students will have the opportunity to apply the concepts we are learning to the world around us.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or equivalent

PSYC 263.00 Sleep and Dreaming 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 42, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65321

Lawrence J Wichlinski

This course will examine recent experimental findings and current perspectives on sleep, dreaming, sleep disorders, and states of consciousness.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 354.00 Counseling Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65274

Steven F Kozberg

An introduction to theories, research, techniques, and issues in the field of counseling psychology.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. Psychology 252 is recommended

PSYC 358.07 Cross-Cultural Psychology Seminar in Prague: Psychopathology 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63865

Ken B Abrams

In the West mental illness has traditionally been approached with a biomedical model that views it as independent of culture. By contrast the "relativist" position assumes that, to a large extent, human behaviors are culturally determined and that the etiology and manifestation of mental disorders are affected by society and culture. This course will address such issues as well as their implications for assessment and treatment through an examination of several Western and non-Western societies, with a special emphasis on Czech society. There will be several guest lectures by Czech psychology professors as well as excursions within Prague to psychiatric hospitals and clinics, where students will meet with Czech clinicians and patients.

Prerequisite: Acceptance in Cross-Cultural Studies in Prague program

OCS Cross Cultural Psychology in Prague

PSYC 367.00 Neuropsychology of Aging 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65322

Julie J Neiworth

With the aging population comes a variety of challenges, including those to cognitive health and decline. Neurodegenerative diseases create various forms of dementia and cause unique problems beyond those that are an outcome of healthy aging. The disabling effects of aging and dementia extend beyond the person to family, friends and wider community. The need to understand and extend knowledge of both healthy aging and the pathological changes that occur with neurodegenerative diseases with aging is of great importance. By understanding how the brain is impacted by age, dementia, and other clinical syndromes, both management of the cognitive issues and advances in treatments to improve mental functioning can be made. This course takes a neuropsychological approach to study healthy aging and neurodegenerative disease. In this seminar, lectures and discussions explore the cognitive, behavioral, and molecular aspects of healthy aging and neurodegenerative disease processes in humans. Cognitive topics include working memory, long term memory, attention, familiarity and recollection, emotion, and social factors that interact with aging. The physiological and cognitive outcomes of neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and various types of dementia are compared with the physiology and cognitive decline evident in healthy aging. Students will read primary articles on these topics, and propose a project based on course discussion and interactions with people at senior centers and convalescent centers in Northfield. 

Prerequisite: Neuroscience 127 or Psychology 216 or Psychology 110 or instructor permission

Extra Time Required

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64837

Colin McLaughlin-Alcock

Anthropology is the study of all human beings in all their diversity, an exploration of what it means to be human throughout the globe. This course helps us to see ourselves, and others, from a new perspective. By examining specific analytic concepts—such as culture—and research methods—such as participant observation—we learn how anthropologists seek to understand, document, and explain the stunning variety of human cultures and ways of organizing society. This course encourages you to consider how looking behind cultural assumptions helps anthropologists solve real world dilemmas.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 64838)

SOAN 111.00 Introduction to Sociology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64839

Elizabeth H Trudeau

Sociology is an intellectual discipline, spanning the gap between the sciences and humanities while often (though not always) involving itself in public policy debates, social reform, and political activism. Sociologists study a startling variety of topics using qualitative and quantitative methods. Still, amidst all this diversity, sociology is centered on a set of core historical theorists (Marx/Weber/Durkheim) and research topics (race/class/gender inequality). We will explore these theoretical and empirical foundations by reading and discussing influential texts and select topics in the study of social inequality while relating them to our own experiences and understanding of the social world. 

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 111.WL0 (Synonym 64840)

SOAN 214.00 Neighborhoods and Cities: Inequalities and Identities 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 65625

Daniel Williams

Inequalities and identities are well understood yet too often disconnected from the context of space and place. In this class, we discuss the ways that neighborhoods and cities are sites of inequality as well as identity. Neighborhoods are linked to the amount of wealth we hold; the schools we attend; the goods, services, and resources we have access to; and who our neighbors are. Neighborhoods are also spaces where identities and community are created, claimed, and contested. They can also be sites of conflict as they change through gentrification or other processes that often reflect inequalities of power, resources, and status. In this course, special attention will be paid to how race, gender and sexuality, and immigration shape inequalities and identity in neighborhoods and cities. This course will also include an academic civic engagement component, collaborating with local communities in Minnesota.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above.

SOAN 330.00 Sociological Thought and Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64842

Wes D Markofski

Many thinkers have contributed to the development of sociology as an intellectual discipline and mode of social inquiry; however, few have had the influence of Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, and Max Weber. This course focuses on influential texts and ideas generated by these and other theorists from sociology’s “classical era,” how these texts and ideas are put to use by contemporary sociologists, and on more recent theoretical developments and critical perspectives that have influenced the field. 

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 396.01 Advanced Sociological and Anthropological Writing 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 23, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64843

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

This course explores different genres of writing and different audiences for writing in the social sciences, focusing particular attention on scholarly articles published in professional journals in sociology and anthropology. To that end, students both analyze sociological and anthropological articles regarding commonalities and differences in academic writing in our two sister disciplines. Students work on their own academic writing process (with the help of peer-review and instructor feedback). The writing itself is broken down into component elements on which students practice and revise their work.

Prerequisite: Completion of Sociology/Anthropology 240 or submission of a topic statement in the preceding spring term and submission of a comps thesis proposal on the first day of fall term. Senior Sociology/Anthropology major or instructor permission

SPAN 229.07 Madrid Program: Current Issues in Spanish Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 63869

Humberto R Huergo

This course offers a fresh look of Spain's current political and economic life. Discussion topics include the rise of Podemos and the new Spanish political scene, the Catalan separatist movement, political corruption, illegal immigration, and the role of the European Union.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or higher and acceptance in Madrid OCS Program

Participation in Carleton OCS Madrid Program

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