ENROLL Course Search

NOTE: There are some inconsistencies in the course listing data - ITS is looking into the cause.

Alternatives: For requirement lists, please refer to the current catalog. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the "Search for Classes" option in The Hub. If you have any other questions, please email registrar@carleton.edu.

Saved Courses (0)

Your search for courses for 22/FA and in AND 036 found 8 courses.

Revise Your Search New Search

CS 202.00 Mathematics of Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 64257

Eric C Alexander

This course introduces some of the formal tools of computer science, using a variety of applications as a vehicle. You'll learn how to encode data so that when you scratch the back of a DVD, it still plays just fine; how to distribute "shares" of your floor's PIN so that any five of you can withdraw money from the floor bank account (but no four of you can); how to play chess; and more. Topics that we'll explore along the way include: logic and proofs, number theory, elementary complexity theory and recurrence relations, basic probability, counting techniques, and graphs.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 and Mathematics 111 or instructor permission

CS 251.00 Programming Languages: Design and Implementation 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 64258

Anna N Rafferty

What makes a programming language like "Python" or like "Java"? This course will look past superficial properties (like indentation) and into the soul of programming languages. We will explore a variety of topics in programming language construction and design: syntax and semantics, mechanisms for parameter passing, typing, scoping, and control structures. Students will expand their programming experience to include other programming paradigms, including functional languages like Scheme and ML.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 or instructor permission

PHYS 131.52 Introduction to Physics: Newtonian Mechanics and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65140

Evan A Rich

A traditional introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111, not open to students who have completed Physics 143, 144 or 145 at Carleton

1st 5 weeks

PHYS 131.59 Introduction to Physics: Newtonian Mechanics and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65141

Evan A Rich, Valerie Fox

A traditional introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111, not open to students who have completed Physics 143, 144 or 145 at Carleton

1st 5 weeks

PHYS 151.52 Introduction to Physics: Relativity and Particles and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65142

Valerie Fox

An introduction to principles of physics in the domain of the very small and very fast. Topics include the special theory of relativity, and selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 120 or 121 (completion or concurrent registration) and Physics 131 (completion or concurrent registration). Not open to students who have completed Physics 143 or 144 at Carleton.

2nd 5 weeks

PHYS 344.00 Classical and Quantum Optics 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65367

Marty Baylor

A junior/senior level course in classical and quantum optics. Includes the phenomena of interference, diffraction and coherence and quantum optical applications, such as unique statistical states of light or the operation of a laser. Modern applications of these areas are studied through such topics as fiber optics telecommunication, optical data storage, or manipulation of atoms by light.

Prerequisite: Physics 235 and Mathematics 232

PHYS 346.00 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65147

Arjendu K Pattanayak

The fundamentals of classical thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Topics include the laws of thermodynamics; heat engines and refrigerators; the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution; the various canonical distributions; the statistical concepts of temperature and entropy; Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein distributions with applications to black-body radiation, phonons, and electrons in solids; the Ising model; and an introduction to critical phenomena.

Prerequisite: Physics 226 or 228

POSC 160.00 Political Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65077

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions.

Search for Courses

This data updates hourly. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the Search for Classes option in The Hub

Instructional Mode
Class Period
Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests