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Your search for courses for 22/FA and in LEIG 330 found 7 courses.

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AFST 120.00 Race and Racism Outside the U.S. 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65636

Daniel Williams

In this course, we examine the ways that race structures difference and inequality in non-U.S. contexts with varying degrees of racial “diversity.” As a construct fundamentally grounded in white supremacy through encounters between Europe and its “Others,” race from its inception has been a global construct for organizing and stratifying human difference. Yet the specific ways that race is constructed varies across societies, with ethnicity and other related concepts of difference substituting for race. Foundational to this course will be how the notions of blackness and whiteness figure into the creation of racial categories, boundaries, and inequalities. Course topics include skin color stratification, “colorblindness,” ethnicity and nationhood, migration and citizenship, media representations, anti-blackness as a global phenomenon, transnational and global flows of racial ideas and categories, and social movements for racial justice.

HIST 100.05 Unknown Latin America 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65644

Pedro F Quijada

As a region, Latin America is famous for the warmth of its people, its historic sites, and its natural wonders. At the same time, it is often treated as a periphery plagued by underdevelopment, violence, and social, economic, and political troubles. This course explores important histories of peoples, places, and events in Latin America that are not widely known yet challenge these stereotypes in fundamental ways. Through primary sources, scholarship, projects, and discussion, we will examine these histories to understand the conditions, connections, and actions that created "bright chapters" and advanced important movements, products, people, and ideas in the political, economic, social, and cultural lives of countries in the region. 

Held for new first year students

HIST 161.00 From Mughals to Mahatma Gandhi: An Introduction to Modern Indian History 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65020

Amna Khalid

An introductory survey course to familiarize students with some of the key themes and debates in the historiography of modern India. Beginning with an overview of Mughal rule in India, the main focus of the course is the colonial period. The course ends with a discussion of 1947: the hour of independence as well as the creation of two new nation-states, India and Pakistan. Topics include Oriental Despotism, colonial rule, nationalism, communalism, gender, caste and race. No prior knowledge of South Asian History required.

POSC 240.00 At the Corner of Broadway and Main Street: The Contrasting Politics of Northfield and the Twin Cities 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 65446

Brian F Harrison

According to the 2020 U.S. Census, roughly 328.2 million people live in the United States. Of that population, 63% live in one of 19,500 “incorporated places,” defined as a city, town ,village, or borough with legally-prescribed limits, powers, and functions. However, three-quarters of incorporated places have fewer than 5,000 people; 42% have fewer than 500 people. In fact, only 40% of all cities have a population of 50,000 or more in 2019, yet nearly 39% of the U.S. population live in those cities. A majority of human social, political, and economic interactions now happen in urban areas (like the Twin Cities) but a significant portion of American life is experienced in smaller towns (like Northfield). Utilizing established social theories, critical thinking skills, and common research techniques, we will learn how to bolster our understanding of both rural and urban phenomena, policies, and processes, addressing topics like political, racial, and class polarization; intolerance; health care; housing, development, and zoning, and transportation. Through field visits to and speakers from both the Twin Cities and Northfield, we will chart the urban/rural political divide to provide a richer understanding of politics and policy in all corners of the United States.

POSC 253.00 Welfare Capitalisms in Post-War Europe 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 65570

Paul Petzschmann

In this course students will explore the different kinds of welfare states that exist in Europe, the political economic and social conditions that made them possible and the debates about their strengths, weaknesses and prospects. We will review the so-called “varieties of capitalism” literature along with key welfare policies such as social insurance, health care, education, unemployment insurance, family and income support, and pensions. Welfare states use combinations of these policies differently to insure citizens against “old” and “new” risks. Finally, the course looks at how welfare regimes have responded of migration, financial, and public health crises.

RELG 273.00 Religious Approaches to Death 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 65559

Jonathan H Dickstein

As the inevitable conclusion of every human existence, our lives are profoundly shaped by death. Consequently, we are all in the process of approaching death—both our own and that of others. This course examines the stunning variety of ways in which humans have approached death and mortality throughout history and across the globe. We will (1) develop a vocabulary of human mortality and death that will allow us to (2) illuminate the structural and functional continuities/discontinuities present across human approaches to death and (3) think critically about mortality and death as we approach them in our own lives.

SOAN 214.00 Neighborhoods and Cities: Inequalities and Identities 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 65625

Daniel Williams

Inequalities and identities are well understood yet too often disconnected from the context of space and place. In this class, we discuss the ways that neighborhoods and cities are sites of inequality as well as identity. Neighborhoods are linked to the amount of wealth we hold; the schools we attend; the goods, services, and resources we have access to; and who our neighbors are. Neighborhoods are also spaces where identities and community are created, claimed, and contested. They can also be sites of conflict as they change through gentrification or other processes that often reflect inequalities of power, resources, and status. In this course, special attention will be paid to how race, gender and sexuality, and immigration shape inequalities and identity in neighborhoods and cities. This course will also include an academic civic engagement component, collaborating with local communities in Minnesota.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above.

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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