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Your search for courses for 22/SP and with code: CGSCELECTIVE found 10 courses.

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BIOL 386.00 Neurobiology 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62143

Fernan Jaramillo

An analysis of the biology of neurons and the nervous system. Topics include the molecular basis of electrical excitability in neurons, synaptic transmission and plasticity, motor control, mechanisms of sensation, and construction and modification of neural circuits.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 387 required

CS 254.00 Computability and Complexity 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 35, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62543

James O Ryan

An introduction to the theory of computation. What problems can and cannot be solved efficiently by computers? What problems cannot be solved by computers, period? Topics include formal models of computation, including finite-state automata, pushdown automata, and Turing machines; formal languages, including regular expressions and context-free grammars; computability and uncomputability; and computational complexity, particularly NP-completeness.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 and Computer Science 202 (Mathematics 236 will be accepted in lieu of Computer Science 202)

CS 344.00 Human-Computer Interaction 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61999

Eric C Alexander

The field of human-computer interaction addresses two fundamental questions: how do people interact with technology, and how can technology enhance the human experience? In this course, we will explore technology through the lens of the end user: how can we design effective, aesthetically pleasing technology, particularly user interfaces, to satisfy user needs and improve the human condition? How do people react to technology and learn to use technology? What are the social, societal, health, and ethical implications of technology? The course will focus on design methodologies, techniques, and processes for developing, testing, and deploying user interfaces.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 or instructor permission

LING 150.00 From Esperanto to Dothraki: The Linguistics of Invented Languages 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62169

Jenna T Conklin

What lies behind the human urge to construct new languages? How has language invention changed over time? What can invented languages teach us about the function of natural languages and their syntactic, morphological, and phonological structure? In this course, students will dive into the history of invented languages, tackle the question of what constitutes a language, and ultimately try their hand at constructing their own language. We’ll explore what separates natural languages from invented ones and discuss how often the very qualities that their creators find most desirable inhibit the widespread adoption they envision for their languages.

Sophomore priority

LING 316.00 Topics in Morphology 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Laird 007

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62809

Morgan Rood

This course explores how languages form words and how contemporary theories account for this complicated process. We concentrate primarily on the interaction between morphology and syntax, but we may also explore the relationship between morphology and phonology. While we will investigate a wide variety of languages, no familiarity with any language other than English is required.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 216

PHIL 116.00 Sensation, Induction, Abduction, Deduction, Seduction 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62197

Jason A Decker

In every academic discipline, we make theories and argue for and against them. This is as true of theology as of geology (and as true of phys ed as of physics). What are the resources we have available to us in making these arguments? It's tempting to split the terrain into (i) raw data, and (ii) rules of right reasoning for processing the data. The most obvious source of raw data is sense experience, and the most obvious candidates for modes of right reasoning are deduction, induction, and abduction. Some philosophers, however, think that sense perception is only one of several sources of raw data (perhaps we also have a faculty of pure intuition or maybe a moral sense), and others have doubted that we have any source of raw data at all. As for the modes of "right" reasoning, Hume famously worried about our (in)ability to justify induction, and others have had similar worries about abduction and even deduction. Can more be said on behalf of our most strongly held beliefs and belief-forming practices than simply that we find them seductive---that we are attracted to them; that they resonate with us? In this course, we'll use some classic historical and contemporary philosophical texts to help us explore these and related issues.

PHIL 272.00 Early Modern Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62201

Douglas B Marshall

This course offers an introduction to major aspects of European theories of being and knowledge during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Key topics to be examined include:  the distinction between the mind and the body; the existence and nature of God; the relationship between cause and effect; the scope and nature of human knowledge. We will place a special emphasis on understanding the philosophical thought of René Descartes, Anne Conway, G. W. Leibniz, and David Hume. Two themes will recur throughout the course: first, the evolving relationships between philosophy and the sciences of the period; second, the philosophical contributions of women in the early modern era.

PSYC 216.00 Behavioral Neuroscience 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61802

Lawrence J Wichlinski

An introduction to the physiological bases of complex behaviors in mammals, with an emphasis on neural and hormonal mechanisms. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 216 and 217 to satisfy the LS requirement. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 217

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Psychology 217; Psychology 110

PSYC 217 required.

PSYC 220.00 Sensation and Perception 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 35, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61796

Julia F Strand

We will address the question of how humans acquire information from the world to support action, learning, belief, choice, and the host of additional mental states that comprise the subject matter of psychology. In other words "How do we get the outside inside?" We will initially consider peripheral anatomical structures (e.g. the eye) and proceed through intermediate levels of sensory coding and transmission to cover the brain regions associated with each of the major senses. Readings will include primary sources and a text. In addition to exams and papers, students will conduct an investigation into an area of personal interest. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor consent

PSYC 375.00 Language and Deception 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Olin 106

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61799

Mija M Van Der Wege

In this course we will examine deception and persuasion in language use. We will take up three main issues. The first is what it means to deceive and how people deceive others through language. What methods do they use, and how do these methods work? The second issue is why people deceive. What purposes do their deceptions serve in court, in advertising, in bureaucracies, in business transactions, and in everyday face-to-face conversation? The third issue is the ethics of deception. Is it legitimate to deceive others, and if so, when and why?

Prerequisite: Psychology 232, 234, 238 or Cognitive Science 236.

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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