ENROLL Course Search

Saved Courses (0)

Your search for courses for 22/SP and with code: EUSTTRANNATL found 16 courses.

Revise Your Search New Search

ARTH 102.00 Introduction to Art History II 6 credits

Open: Size: 60, Registered: 42, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Boliou 161

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61537

Ross K Elfline, Jessica F Keating

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from the fifteenth century through the present. The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, humanist and Reformation redefinitions of art in the Italian and Northern Renaissance, realism, modernity and tradition, the tension between self-expression and the art market, and the use of art for political purposes.

ENGL 135.00 Imperial Adventures 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62242

Arnab Chakladar

Indiana Jones has a pedigree. In this class we will encounter some of his ancestors in stories, novels and comic books from the early decades of the twentieth century. The wilds of Afghanistan, the African forest, a prehistoric world in Patagonia, the opium dens of mysterious exotic London--these will be but some of our stops as we examine the structure and ideology and lasting legacy of the imperial adventure tale. Authors we will read include Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Rudyard Kipling and H. Rider Haggard.

EUST 159.00 "The Age of Isms" - Ideals, Ideas and Ideologies in Modern Europe 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62020

Paul Petzschmann

"Ideology" is perhaps one of the most-used (and overused) terms of modern political life. This course will introduce students to important political ideologies and traditions of modern Europe and their role in the development of political systems and institutional practices from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. We will read central texts by conservatives, liberals, socialists, anarchists and nationalists while also considering ideological outliers such as Fascism and Green Political Thought. In addition the course will introduce students to the different ways in which ideas can be studied systematically and the methodologies available.

FREN 255.07 Paris Program: Islam in France: Historical Approaches and Current Debates 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 60210

Scott D Carpenter

In this course, students will explore the historical, cultural, social, and religious traces of Islam as they have been woven over time into the modern fabric of French society. Through images drawn from film, photography, television, and museum displays, they will discover the important role this cultural contact zone has played in the French experience. The course will take advantage of the resources of the city of Paris and will include excursions to museums as well as cultural and religious centers.

Prerequisite: French 204 or the equivalent and participation in Paris OCS program

Participation in Carleton OCS Paris Program

FREN 259.07 Paris Program: Hybrid Paris 6 credits

Scott D Carpenter

Through literature, cultural texts, and experiential learning in the city, this course will explore the development of both the "Frenchness" and the hybridity that constitute contemporary Paris. Immigrant cultures, notably North African, will also be highlighted. Plays, music, and visits to cultural sites will complement the readings.

Prerequisite: French 204 or the equivalent and participation in OCS Paris program

Participation in Carleton OCS Paris Program

FREN 353.00 The French Chanson 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 202

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 60552

Éva S Pósfay

In Beaumarchais’s oft-cited words, “Everything ends with songs.” This course will study the distinctiveness of French chanson (song) and its unique role in French history and culture from Montmartre’s cafés-concerts to the present. We will examine iconic performances in Parisian cabarets, music halls, and nightclubs; the rise of the singer-songwriter; the changing dynamics between lyrics (poetry), music, and performance over time; song categories such as yé-yé, the protest song, and the chanson about Paris; rap and slam’s poetic affiliation with chanson; musical hybridity and identity politics; and the clout of the music industry. No musical experience necessary. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

FREN 359.07 Paris Program: Hybrid Paris 6 credits

Scott D Carpenter

Through literature, cultural texts, and experiential learning in the city, this course will explore the development of both the "Frenchness" and the hybridity that constitute contemporary Paris. Immigrant cultures, notably North African, will also be highlighted. Plays, music, and visits to cultural sites will complement the readings.

Prerequisite: French 230 or beyond and participation in OCS Paris program

Participation in Carleton OCS Paris Program

GERM 221.00 (re/ex)press yourself: Sexuality and Gender in Fin-de-Siècle Literature and Art 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 244

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61291

Juliane Schicker

In this course, we will explore literature and art of German-speaking countries around the topics of gender and sex(uality). We will focus on the years between 1880 and 1920, but also venture into more recent times. What was the image of men and women at the time and how did these images change or remain the same? How did science factor into these images? What was/is considered “normal” when it comes to sex(uality) and gender, and what German-speaking voices have been pushing against those norms? How did these voices use literature and art to reflect or criticize such norms? Texts and class discussions will be in English. 

In Translation

HIST 141.00 Europe in the Twentieth Century 6 credits

David G Tompkins

This course explores developments in European history in a global context from the final decade of the nineteenth century through to the present. We will focus on the impact of nationalism, war, and revolution on the everyday experiences of women and men, and also look more broadly on the chaotic economic, political, social, and cultural life of the period. Of particular interest will be the rise of fascism and communism, and the challenge to Western-style liberal democracy, followed by the Cold War and communism’s collapse near the end of the century.

HIST 233.00 The Byzantine World and Its Neighbors, 750-ca. 1453 6 credits

William L North

The Byzantine world (eighth-fifteenth centuries) was a zone of fascinating tensions, exchanges, and encounters. Through a wide variety of written and visual evidence, we will examine key features of its history and culture: the nature of government; piety and religious controversy; art and music; the evolving relations with the Latin West, Armenia, the Slavic North and West, and the Dar al-Islam (the Abbasids and Seljuk and Ottoman Turks); gender; economic life; and social relations. Extra time will be required for special events and a group project (ecumenical council).

Extra Time Required

HIST 238.00 The Viking World 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62467

Austin P Mason

In the popular imagination, Vikings are horn-helmeted, blood-thirsty pirates who raped and pillaged their way across medieval Europe. But the Norse did much more than loot, rape, and pillage; they cowed kings and fought for emperors, explored uncharted waters and settled the North Atlantic, and established new trade routes that revived European urban life. In this course, we will separate fact from fiction by critically examining primary source documents alongside archaeological, linguistic and place-name evidence. Students will share their insights with each other and the world through two major collaborative digital humanities projects over the course of the term.

HIST 287.00 From Alchemy to the Atom Bomb: The Scientific Revolution and the Making of the Modern World 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 62468

Antony E Adler

This course examines the growth of modern science since the Renaissance with an emphasis on the Scientific Revolution, the development of scientific methodology, and the emergence of new scientific disciplines. How might a history of science focused on scientific networks operating within society, rather than on individual scientists, change our understanding of “genius,” “progress,” and “scientific impartiality?” We will consider a range of scientific developments, treating science both as a body of knowledge and as a set of practices, and will gauge the extent to which our knowledge of the natural world is tied to who, when, and where such knowledge has been produced and circulated.

HIST 341.00 The Russian Revolution and its Global Legacies 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

The Russian revolution of 1917 was one of the seminal events of the twentieth century. It transformed much beyond Russia itself. This course will take stock of the event and its legacy. What was the Russian revolution? What was its place in the history of revolutions? How did it impact the world? How was it seen by those who made it and those who witnessed it? How have these evaluations changed over time? What sense can we make of it in the year of its centenary? The revolution was both an inspiration (to many revolutionary and national-liberation movements) and used as a tale of caution and admonition (by adversaries of the Soviet Union). The readings will put the Russian revolution in the broadest perspective of the twentieth century and its contested evaluations, from within the Soviet Union and beyond, from its immediate aftermath, through World War II, the Cold War, to the post-Soviet period. The course is aimed at all students interested in the history of the twentieth century and of the idea of the revolution.

Prerequisite: One course in Modern European History or instructor consent

PHIL 272.00 Early Modern Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62201

Douglas B Marshall

This course offers an introduction to major aspects of European theories of being and knowledge during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Key topics to be examined include:  the distinction between the mind and the body; the existence and nature of God; the relationship between cause and effect; the scope and nature of human knowledge. We will place a special emphasis on understanding the philosophical thought of René Descartes, Anne Conway, G. W. Leibniz, and David Hume. Two themes will recur throughout the course: first, the evolving relationships between philosophy and the sciences of the period; second, the philosophical contributions of women in the early modern era.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62515

Huan Gao

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 62516)

POSC 244.00 The Politics of Eurovision 3 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 60239

Dev Gupta

At first glance, Eurovision, the decades-long, continent-wide singing contest, is nothing more than a mindless pop culture event. Dismissed as a celebration of (at best) mediocre music, Eurovision seems like it would be the last place to learn about serious politics. In this class, however, we will explore Eurovision as a place where art is deeply political and often engages in debates about gender and sexuality, race, the legacies of colonialism, war and revolution, nationalism, and democracy—not just within the context of the competition itself but how these discussions spill over into broader social and political dynamics.

1st 5 weeks

Search for Courses

This data updates hourly. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the Search for Classes option in The Hub

Instructional Mode
Class Period
Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests