ENROLL Course Search

Saved Courses (0)

Your search for courses for 22/SP and with code: POSCELECOTHER found 11 courses.

Revise Your Search New Search

AMST 396.00 Commodifying and Policing: Globalization of the American Suburb and City 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61933

Richard A Keiser

How does the American export of suburban living, gated communities, and broken-windows policing reshape place, identity and the socio-economic hierarchy?  We will also investigate how the commodification of the arts and the neoliberalization of education contribute to gentrification and other forms of spatial cleansing and rebranding. Required for juniors in the American Studies major.

Prerequisite: American Studies 115, 287 or instructor permission

ECON 270.00 Economics of the Public Sector 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62378

Jenny Bourne

This course provides a theoretical and empirical examination of the government's role in the U.S. economy. Emphasis is placed on policy analysis using the criteria of efficiency and equity. Topics include rationales for government intervention; analysis of alternative public expenditure programs from a partial and/or general equilibrium framework; the incidence of various types of taxes; models of collective choice; cost-benefit analysis; intergovernmental fiscal relations.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 277.00 History and Theory of Financial Crises 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 60402

Victor Almeida

This course provides a historical perspective on financial crises and highlights their main empirical patterns. This course also introduces economic theories of financial crises, in which leverage, moral hazard, mistaken beliefs, and coordination problems play a central role. We will also discuss some policy instruments used to balance risk exposure, such as deposit insurance, collective action clauses, exchange controls, and foreign reserves.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

EUST 159.00 "The Age of Isms" - Ideals, Ideas and Ideologies in Modern Europe 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62020

Paul Petzschmann

"Ideology" is perhaps one of the most-used (and overused) terms of modern political life. This course will introduce students to important political ideologies and traditions of modern Europe and their role in the development of political systems and institutional practices from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. We will read central texts by conservatives, liberals, socialists, anarchists and nationalists while also considering ideological outliers such as Fascism and Green Political Thought. In addition the course will introduce students to the different ways in which ideas can be studied systematically and the methodologies available.

HIST 123.00 U.S. Women's History Since 1877 6 credits

Annette R Igra

In the twentieth century women participated in the redefinition of politics and the state, sexuality and family life, and work and leisure as the United States became a modern, largely urban society. We will explore how the dimensions of race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality shaped diverse women's experiences of these historical changes. Topics will include: immigration, the expansion of the welfare system and the consumer economy, labor force segmentation and the world wars, and women's activism in civil rights, labor, peace and feminist movements.

HIST 141.00 Europe in the Twentieth Century 6 credits

David G Tompkins

This course explores developments in European history in a global context from the final decade of the nineteenth century through to the present. We will focus on the impact of nationalism, war, and revolution on the everyday experiences of women and men, and also look more broadly on the chaotic economic, political, social, and cultural life of the period. Of particular interest will be the rise of fascism and communism, and the challenge to Western-style liberal democracy, followed by the Cold War and communism’s collapse near the end of the century.

HIST 161.00 From Mughals to Mahatma Gandhi: An Introduction to Modern Indian History 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62459

Amna Khalid

An introductory survey course to familiarize students with some of the key themes and debates in the historiography of modern India. Beginning with an overview of Mughal rule in India, the main focus of the course is the colonial period. The course ends with a discussion of 1947: the hour of independence as well as the creation of two new nation-states, India and Pakistan. Topics include Oriental Despotism, colonial rule, nationalism, communalism, gender, caste and race. No prior knowledge of South Asian History required.

HIST 260.00 The Making of the Modern Middle East 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62462

Adeeb Khalid

A survey of major political and social developments from the fifteenth century to the beginning of World War I. Topics include: state and society, the military and bureaucracy, religious minorities (Jews and Christians), and women in premodern Muslim societies; the encounter with modernity.

HIST 263.00 Plagues of Empire 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62578

Amna Khalid

The globalization of disease is often seen as a recent phenomenon aided by high-speed communication and travel. This course examines the history of the spread of infectious diseases by exploring the connection between disease, medicine and European imperial expansion. We consider the ways in which European expansion from 1500 onwards changed the disease landscape of the world and how pre-existing diseases in the tropics shaped and thwarted imperial ambitions. We will also question how far Western medicine can be seen as a benefit by examining its role in facilitating colonial expansion and constructing racial and gender difference.

HIST 341.00 The Russian Revolution and its Global Legacies 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

The Russian revolution of 1917 was one of the seminal events of the twentieth century. It transformed much beyond Russia itself. This course will take stock of the event and its legacy. What was the Russian revolution? What was its place in the history of revolutions? How did it impact the world? How was it seen by those who made it and those who witnessed it? How have these evaluations changed over time? What sense can we make of it in the year of its centenary? The revolution was both an inspiration (to many revolutionary and national-liberation movements) and used as a tale of caution and admonition (by adversaries of the Soviet Union). The readings will put the Russian revolution in the broadest perspective of the twentieth century and its contested evaluations, from within the Soviet Union and beyond, from its immediate aftermath, through World War II, the Cold War, to the post-Soviet period. The course is aimed at all students interested in the history of the twentieth century and of the idea of the revolution.

Prerequisite: One course in Modern European History or instructor consent

SOAN 323.00 Mother Earth: Women, Development and the Environment 6 credits

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Why are so many sustainable development projects anchored around women's cooperatives? Why is poverty depicted as having a woman's face? Is the solution to the environmental crisis in the hands of women the nurturers? From overly romantic notions of stewardship to the feminization of poverty, this course aims to evaluate women's relationships with local environments and development initiatives. The course uses anthropological frameworks to evaluate case studies from around the world.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

Search for Courses

This data updates hourly. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the Search for Classes option in The Hub

Instructional Mode
Class Period
Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests