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Your search for courses for 22/SP and with code: POSIELECTIVE found 7 courses.

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EUST 159.00 "The Age of Isms" - Ideals, Ideas and Ideologies in Modern Europe 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62020

Paul Petzschmann

"Ideology" is perhaps one of the most-used (and overused) terms of modern political life. This course will introduce students to important political ideologies and traditions of modern Europe and their role in the development of political systems and institutional practices from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. We will read central texts by conservatives, liberals, socialists, anarchists and nationalists while also considering ideological outliers such as Fascism and Green Political Thought. In addition the course will introduce students to the different ways in which ideas can be studied systematically and the methodologies available.

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Brian F Harrison

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 210.00 Misinformation, Political Rumors, and Conspiracy Theories 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

CMC 306

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62529

Christina E Farhart

Why do people believe in conspiracy theories, hold on to misinformed beliefs even in the face of mounting evidence to the contrary, and/or spread political and social rumors that may have little basis in fact? Who is most vulnerable to these various forms of misinformation? What are the normative and political consequences of misperceptions (if any)? This course explores the psychological, political, and philosophical approaches to the study of the causes, consequences, and tenacity of conspiracy beliefs, misinformation, and political rumors, as well as possible approaches that journalists could employ to combat misperceptions.

POSC 244.00 The Politics of Eurovision 3 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 60239

Dev Gupta

At first glance, Eurovision, the decades-long, continent-wide singing contest, is nothing more than a mindless pop culture event. Dismissed as a celebration of (at best) mediocre music, Eurovision seems like it would be the last place to learn about serious politics. In this class, however, we will explore Eurovision as a place where art is deeply political and often engages in debates about gender and sexuality, race, the legacies of colonialism, war and revolution, nationalism, and democracy—not just within the context of the competition itself but how these discussions spill over into broader social and political dynamics.

1st 5 weeks

POSC 256.00 Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62531

Laurence D Cooper

Nietzsche understood himself to be living at a moment of great endings: the exhaustion of modernity, the self-undermining of rationalism, the self-overcoming of morality--in short, stunningly, the "death of God." He regarded these endings as an unprecedented disaster for humanity but also as an unprecedented opportunity, and he pointed the way to a new ideal and a new culture that would be life-affirming and life-enhancing. This course will center on close study of Beyond Good and Evil, perhaps Nietzsche's most beautiful book and probably his most political one. Selections from some of his other books will also be assigned. 

POSC 302.00 Subordinated Politics and Intergroup Relations* 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

How do social and political groups interact? How do we understand these interactions in relation to power? This course will introduce the basic approaches and debates in the study of prejudice, racial attitudes, and intergroup relations. We will focus on three main questions. First, how do we understand and study prejudice and racism as they relate to U.S. politics? Second, how do group identities, stereotyping, and other factors help us understand the legitimation of discrimination, group hierarchy, and social domination? Third, what are the political and social challenges associated with reducing prejudice?

POSC 330.00 The Complexity of Politics* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Laird 007

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62535

Greg G Marfleet

Theories of complexity and emergence relate to how large-scale collective properties and characteristics of a system can arise from the behavior and attributes of component parts. This course explores the relevance of these concepts, studied mainly in physics and biology, for the social sciences. Students will explore agent-based modeling to discover emergent properties of social systems through computer simulations they create using NetLogo software. Reading and seminar discussion topics include conflict and cooperation, electoral competition, transmission of culture and social networks. Completion of the stats/methods sequence is highly recommended.

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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