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ARCN 246.52 Archaeological Methods & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 61724

Sarah A Kennedy

As a field that is truly interdisciplinary, archaeology uses a wide range of methods to study the past. This course provides a hands-on introduction to the entire archaeological process through classroom, field, and laboratory components. Students will participate in background research concerning local places of historical or archaeological interest; landscape surveying and mapping in GIS; excavation; the recording, analysis, and interpretation of artifacts; and the publication of results. This course involves real archaeological fieldwork, and students will have an opportunity to contribute to the history of the local community while learning archaeological methods applicable all over the world.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ARCN 246.WL2 (Synonym 61725)

ASTR 113.00 Observational and Laboratory Astronomy 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Goodsell 104

MTWTHF
9:00pm11:59pm
Synonym: 61853

Cindy A Blaha

Theory and practice of basic techniques in observational and laboratory astronomy. Certain problems involve the use of the 16-inch and 8-inch telescopes.

Prerequisite: Astronomy 100, 110, 127, 232, 233, Physics 226, 228, 232, 233 or instructor permission

S/Cr/NC only

ASTR 232.00 Astrophysics I 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Olin 106

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61854

Ryan C Terrien

A study of stellar structure and evolution with an emphasis on the physical principles underlying the observed phenomena. Topics include the birth, evolution, and death of stars, pulsars, black holes, and white dwarfs.

Prerequisite: Physics 226, 228, 231 or instructor permission

Crosslisted with PHYS 232

BIOL 126.52 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62124

Daniel Hernández, Rika E Anderson, David Hougen-Eitzman

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL2 (Synonym 62128)

BIOL 126.53 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 19, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 62125

Daniel Hernández, Rika E Anderson, Annie L Bosacker

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL3 (Synonym 62129)

BIOL 126.54 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62126

Daniel Hernández, Rika E Anderson, John L Berini

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL4 (Synonym 62130)

BIOL 126.59 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62127

Daniel Hernández, Rika E Anderson, Sarah Deel

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL9 (Synonym 62131)

BIOL 240.00 Genetics 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 42, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62132

Stephan G Zweifel

A study of the transmission of genetic information between generations of organisms, and of the mechanism of expression of information within an individual organism. The main emphasis will be on the physical and chemical basis of heredity; mutational, transmissional and functional analysis of the genetic material, and gene expression.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority, requires concurrent registration in Biology 241

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 240.WL0 (Synonym 62133)

BIOL 352.00 Population Ecology 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62138

Mark McKone

An investigation of the properties of populations and communities. Topics include population growth and regulation, life tables, interspecific and intraspecific competition, predation, parasitism, mutualism, the nature of communities, and biogeography.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126, and Mathematics 111 or other previous calculus course. Recommended course: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or equivalent exposure to statistical analysis; concurrent registration in Biology 353

BIOL 353 required.

BIOL 356.00 Seminar: Topics in Developmental Biology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62155

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff

The development of an embryo from a single cell to a complex body requires the coordinated efforts of a growing number of cells and cell types. In this seminar course, we will use primary literature to explore recent advances in our understanding of the cellular processes such as intercellular signaling, migration, proliferation, and differentiation that make development possible. Additionally, we will consider how these developmental cellular processes, when disrupted, lead to cancer and other diseases. Priority will be given to juniors and seniors who have not already taken a seminar course.

Prerequisite: Biology 240, Biology 280 or Biology 342

Waitlist only

BIOL 370.00 Seminar: Selected Topics in Virology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62141

Debby R Walser-Kuntz

An examination of selected animal viruses. The course will focus on the most recent developments in HIV-related research, including implications for HIV-treatment and vaccines and the impact of viral infection on the immune system of the host. In addition to studying the structure and replication of particular viruses we will also discuss the current laboratory techniques used in viral research. 

Prerequisite: Biology 240 or 280.

Waitlist Only

BIOL 374.00 Seminar: Grassland Ecology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

CMC 210

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62142

Daniel Hernández

Grassland ecosystems cover one third of the Earth's surface and occur on every continent except Antarctica. Grasslands provide habitat for millions of species, play a major role in global carbon and nutrient cycles, and are the primary source of agricultural land, making them an important ecosystem both ecologically and economically. This course will utilize scientific literature to explore the environmental and biological characteristics of the world's grasslands from population dynamics to ecosystem processes. Topics include competition and succession, plant-animal interactions, carbon and nutrient cycling, the role of disturbances such as fire and land use change, and grassland management and restoration.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126, and one of Biology 210, 238, 248, 321 or 352 and instructor permission

Waitlist Only.

BIOL 386.00 Neurobiology 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62143

Fernan Jaramillo

An analysis of the biology of neurons and the nervous system. Topics include the molecular basis of electrical excitability in neurons, synaptic transmission and plasticity, motor control, mechanisms of sensation, and construction and modification of neural circuits.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 387 required

CHEM 123.52 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 221

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61702

Julia G Bakker-Arkema

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 123.57 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 221

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61703

Julia G Bakker-Arkema

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 224.54 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61706

Deborah S Gross

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 224.59 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61707

Deborah S Gross

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 234.54 Organic Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 22, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61708

Joe Chihade

The chemistry of functional groups is continued from Chemistry 233, and is extended to the multifunctional compounds found in nature, in particular carbohydrates and proteins. The laboratory focuses upon inquiry-based projects and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233

CHEM 234.59 Organic Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 22, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61709

Joe Chihade

The chemistry of functional groups is continued from Chemistry 233, and is extended to the multifunctional compounds found in nature, in particular carbohydrates and proteins. The laboratory focuses upon inquiry-based projects and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233

CHEM 306.54 Spectrometric Characterization of Chemical Compounds 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323 / Anderson Hall 311

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61718

David G Alberg

This combined lecture and lab course teaches students how to use modern spectrometric techniques for the structural characterization of molecules. Lectures will cover topics and problems in the theory and practical applications associated with GC-Mass Spectrometry, ESI-Mass Spectrometry, Infrared, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H, 13C, and 2D experiments). Students will apply all of these techniques in the laboratory for the structural characterization of known and unknown molecules.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 234 or instructor permission

CHEM 306.59 Spectrometric Characterization of Chemical Compounds 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323 / Anderson Hall 311

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61719

David G Alberg

This combined lecture and lab course teaches students how to use modern spectrometric techniques for the structural characterization of molecules. Lectures will cover topics and problems in the theory and practical applications associated with GC-Mass Spectrometry, ESI-Mass Spectrometry, Infrared, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H, 13C, and 2D experiments). Students will apply all of these techniques in the laboratory for the structural characterization of known and unknown molecules.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 234 or instructor permission

CHEM 320.00 Biological Chemistry 6 credits

Closed: Size: 40, Registered: 42, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61710

Chris T Calderone

This course involves the natural extension of the principles of chemistry to biological systems. The topics to be examined center around the biochemical formation and cleavage of chemical bonds, with an emphasis on the structure and function of the proteins that mediate these processes.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 234 and either Chemistry 224 or Biology 380

CHEM 321.01 Biological Chemistry Laboratory 2 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
1:00pm5:00pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61711

Chris T Calderone

Purification and characterization of proteins and nucleic acids, with a focus on enzyme kinetics and mechanism, macromolecular interactions with small molecules and the basis of specificity in biological systems. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Chemistry 320; Chemistry 234 and either Chemistry 224 or Biology 380

CHEM 320 required.

CHEM 321.02 Biological Chemistry Laboratory 2 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:00am12:00pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61712

Chris T Calderone

Purification and characterization of proteins and nucleic acids, with a focus on enzyme kinetics and mechanism, macromolecular interactions with small molecules and the basis of specificity in biological systems. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Chemistry 320; Chemistry 234 and either Chemistry 224 or Biology 380

CHEM 320 required.

CHEM 351.00 Inorganic Chemistry 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

CMC 304

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61713

Andjela Radmilovic

Symmetry, molecular orbital theory and ligand field theory will provide a framework to explore the bonding, magnetism and spectroscopic properties of coordination complexes. Topics in reactivity (hard and soft acids and bases), bioinorganic chemistry, reaction mechanisms, and organometallic chemistry, will also be introduced.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 234

CHEM 352.01 Laboratory in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 2 credits

Closed: Size: 6, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 325

MTWTHF
1:00pm5:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61720

Andjela Radmilovic

Synthesis, purification and spectroscopic characterization of transition-metal complexes with an emphasis on methods for preparing and handling air-sensitive compounds. One laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous registation in Chemistry 351

CHEM 351 required.

CHEM 352.02 Laboratory in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 2 credits

Closed: Size: 6, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 325

MTWTHF
8:00am12:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61721

Andjela Radmilovic

Synthesis, purification and spectroscopic characterization of transition-metal complexes with an emphasis on methods for preparing and handling air-sensitive compounds. One laboratory per week. 

Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous registation in Chemistry 351

CHEM 351 required.

CS 111.01 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 60511

James O Ryan

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

CS 111.02 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 60512

David R Musicant

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL2 (Synonym 60515)

CS 111.03 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 60513

Anna N Rafferty

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL3 (Synonym 60514)

CS 201.01 Data Structures 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 60516

Eric C Alexander

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 201.WL1 (Synonym 60518)

CS 201.02 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 60517

Anna N Rafferty

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

CS 344.00 Human-Computer Interaction 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61999

Eric C Alexander

The field of human-computer interaction addresses two fundamental questions: how do people interact with technology, and how can technology enhance the human experience? In this course, we will explore technology through the lens of the end user: how can we design effective, aesthetically pleasing technology, particularly user interfaces, to satisfy user needs and improve the human condition? How do people react to technology and learn to use technology? What are the social, societal, health, and ethical implications of technology? The course will focus on design methodologies, techniques, and processes for developing, testing, and deploying user interfaces.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 or instructor permission

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62371

Yingtong Xie

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62372

Victor Almeida

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.03 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

CMC 210

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62373

Michael T Hemesath

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62374

Aaron M Swoboda

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62375

Faress F Bhuiyan

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62376

Aaron M Swoboda

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 270.00 Economics of the Public Sector 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62378

Jenny Bourne

This course provides a theoretical and empirical examination of the government's role in the U.S. economy. Emphasis is placed on policy analysis using the criteria of efficiency and equity. Topics include rationales for government intervention; analysis of alternative public expenditure programs from a partial and/or general equilibrium framework; the incidence of various types of taxes; models of collective choice; cost-benefit analysis; intergovernmental fiscal relations.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 278.00 Industrial Organization and Firm Behavior 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62379

Nathan D Grawe

This course analyzes the firm's marketing and pricing problems, its conduct, and the resulting economic performance, given the nature of the demand for its products, its buying markets, the nature of its unit costs, and the structure of its selling markets.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 283.00 Corporate Organization and Finance 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62380

Yingtong Xie

This course investigates decision-making by firms and their managers. Specific topics include tradeoffs in corporate organization, executive compensation, project valuation, the cost of capital under debt and equity financing, and the firm’s optimal capital structure. 

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 329.00 Econometrics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 62382

Mark T Kanazawa

This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both econometric theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Prior experience with R is strongly encouraged. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, experimental design, issues of functional specification, model overfitting and underfitting, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and either Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275), and Economics 110 and 111 or instructor consent

ECON 331.00 Intermediate Macro Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62383

Ethan L Struby

Analysis of the forces determining the general level of output, employment, and prices with special emphasis on the role of money and on interest rate determination. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275) or instructor consent and Economics 110 and 111

ENGL 327.00 Victorian Novel 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62255

Susan Jaret McKinstry

Puzzled about nineteenth century novels, Henry James asks, 'But what do such large loose baggy monsters with their queer elements of the accidental and the arbitrary, artistically mean?'' (“Preface,” The Tragic Muse). What, indeed? Practicing close reading, surface reading, and distant reading, we will examine the prose, design, and illustrations of Victorian editions, and ask how big data might help us define and interpret the nineteenth century novel. Authors might include George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Emily Bronte, Charlotte Bronte, E.M. Forster, Lewis Carroll.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one additional 6 credit English course or instructor consent

ENTS 225.00 Carbon and Climate 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 123

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 62557

Dan P Maxbauer

This course will focus on the interconnections between the Earth’s carbon cycle and climate system. Particular interest will be given to how Earth system processes involved in the carbon cycle operate on geologic timescales and how these systems are responding to anthropogenic emissions. Required weekly laboratories will explore carbon cycle processes in local environments and will include outdoor field work, lab analyses, and computer modeling.

Prerequisite: One lab science course

GEOL 120.53 Introduction to Environmental Geology & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 129

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 61754

Chloé Fandel

An introduction to geology emphasizing the physical basis of systems of interest to environmentalists, ecologists, and policy makers. Field trips and laboratories included.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken another Geology 100-level course

Held for first year students

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 120.WL3 (Synonym 61756)

GEOL 370.00 Geochemistry of Natural Waters 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 149

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 61760

Bereket Haileab

The main goal of this course is to introduce and tie together the several diverse disciplines that must be brought to bear on hydrogeochemical problems today. This course will explore: principles of geochemistry, applications of chemical thermodynamics to geologic problems, mineral solubility, stability diagrams, chemical aspects of sedimentary rocks, geochemical tracers, radiogenic isotopes and principles of stable isotope fractionation. Laboratories included.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or permission of the instructor

HIST 233.00 The Byzantine World and Its Neighbors, 750-ca. 1453 6 credits

William L North

The Byzantine world (eighth-fifteenth centuries) was a zone of fascinating tensions, exchanges, and encounters. Through a wide variety of written and visual evidence, we will examine key features of its history and culture: the nature of government; piety and religious controversy; art and music; the evolving relations with the Latin West, Armenia, the Slavic North and West, and the Dar al-Islam (the Abbasids and Seljuk and Ottoman Turks); gender; economic life; and social relations. Extra time will be required for special events and a group project (ecumenical council).

Extra Time Required

HIST 282.07 African Diaspora in Arabia 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60213

Thabiti C Willis

This course offers a broad historical overview of African men's and women's experiences as religious, political, and military leaders, as merchants and poets, and in agricultural and maritime industries in Arabia. Situated primarily in Bahrain, with travel to Oman, the course will examine longstanding historical, cultural, and commercial exchanges between Africa and the Gulf from medieval times to the present day. The course will question the ideologies that assume that Africa and Arabia represent racial and cultural difference.

Prerequisite: 100 or 200 level Africana Studies or History course and participation on OCS program

Participation in Africa and Arabia OCS Program

NEUR 238.00 Neurons, Circuits and Behavior 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61920

Eric D Hoopfer

Neurons are the building blocks of the nervous system. Molecular and cellular neuroscience seeks to understand the fundamental principles that govern how neurons function, how they communicate with each other, and how they assemble into circuits that generate behavior. This course focuses on the molecular and cellular basis of nervous system function from the level of genes and molecules to neural circuits and behavior. We will take an integrative approach to examine the genetic, molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie neuronal communication, the molecular basis of sensation and innate behaviors, neural plasticity, and nervous system disorders. This course will emphasize the experimental evidence and techniques that have built our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of behavior through team-based learning, analysis of primary literature papers and laboratory experimentation. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Neuroscience 238 and 239 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Neuroscience 127 or Biology 125.; Concurrent registration in Neuroscience 239.

PHIL 319.00 Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

CMC 306

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61441

Laura M Ruetsche

Quantum theories of matter are astonishingly successful—and deeply mysterious. Niels Bohr is said to have remarked that “those who are not shocked when they first come across quantum theory cannot possibly have understood it.” Richard Feynman said, “I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics.” Some quantum weirdness is unavoidable — it appears, for instance, that wholes really are more than the sum of their parts and that nature is non-local in a surprising way. Other weirdnesses are features of some ways of understanding quantum mechanics but not others: indeterminism, randomness, branching worlds, surprising connections between the physical and the mental. We will look at some currently popular approaches: Bohm's deterministic theory, spontaneous collapse theories, many-worlds and many-minds theories.

Prerequisite: One Previous Philosophy course or instructor consent

PHYS 143.57 Physical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:50am11:00am9:30am10:35am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61898

Marty Baylor

This course begins with an introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 144, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Combined content of PHYS 131 and PHYS 151

PHYS 145.52 Mechanics and Waves and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 025

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:00pm5:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61899

Jay D Tasson

This course begins with an introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. The course moves on to a study of the properties of fluids (both static and dynamic) and the principles of waves and wave motion (including both sound and light). Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 143, or 144 at Carleton.

Combined content of PHYS 131/153

PHYS 145.59 Mechanics and Waves and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 025

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm8:00am12:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61900

Jay D Tasson

This course begins with an introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. The course moves on to a study of the properties of fluids (both static and dynamic) and the principles of waves and wave motion (including both sound and light). Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 143, or 144 at Carleton.

Combined content of PHYS 131/153

PHYS 232.00 Astrophysics I 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Olin 106

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61855

Ryan C Terrien

A study of stellar structure and evolution with an emphasis on the physical principles underlying the observed phenomena. Topics include the birth, evolution, and death of stars, pulsars, black holes, and white dwarfs.

Prerequisite: Physics 226, 228 or 231

Crosslisted with ASTR 232

Cross-listed with ASTR 232.00

PHYS 234.00 Computer Simulations in Complex Physical Systems 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61901

Barry N Costanzi

The development of techniques to study complex physical systems from a probabilistic and numerical standpoint using Mathematica. Subject material is applicable to all the sciences and mathematics. Some topics considered are random walks, percolation clusters, avalanches, traffic flow, the spread of forest fires and diseases, and a brief introduction to Bayesian statistics. No Mathematica skills are assumed.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 143, or 144, or instructor permission

PHYS 235.52 Electricity and Magnetism and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61902

Helen K Minsky, Marty Baylor

Electric and magnetic fields in free space, and their interactions with charges and currents. Topics include DC and AC circuits, Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic waves. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Physics 165, 226, 228 or Physics 231; Mathematics 210 or Mathematics 211; or instructor permission

PHYS 235.59 Electricity and Magnetism and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61904

Helen K Minsky

Electric and magnetic fields in free space, and their interactions with charges and currents. Topics include DC and AC circuits, Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic waves. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Physics 165, 226, 228 or Physics 231; Mathematics 210 or Mathematics 211; or instructor permission

PHYS 342.54 Contemporary Experimental Physics and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61906

Melissa Eblen-Zayas

A study of experimental techniques and apparatus basic to the measurements which underlie and validate contemporary theories in physics. Topics include electrical measurements, data analysis and statistics, optical and laser techniques, particle detectors, and time coincidence techniques. Applications are made to experiments such as magnetic resonance, Mossbauer and nuclear spectroscopy and laser optics. Class time is devoted to studying the measurement techniques and considering phenomenological models of the effects observed in the laboratory. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: (Physics 227 or 228) and 235 and (Physics 335 or Physic 346) or instructor permission

PHYS 342.57 Contemporary Experimental Physics and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm8:00am12:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61905

Melissa Eblen-Zayas

A study of experimental techniques and apparatus basic to the measurements which underlie and validate contemporary theories in physics. Topics include electrical measurements, data analysis and statistics, optical and laser techniques, particle detectors, and time coincidence techniques. Applications are made to experiments such as magnetic resonance, Mossbauer and nuclear spectroscopy and laser optics. Class time is devoted to studying the measurement techniques and considering phenomenological models of the effects observed in the laboratory. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: (Physics 227 or 228) and 235 and (Physics 335 or Physic 346) or instructor permission

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Brian F Harrison

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62519

Summer N Forester

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 222.00 Political Science Lab: Interviewing Techniques 3 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61388

Dev Gupta

This class provides a hands-on introduction to how researchers devise, conduct, and analyze interviews in political science. Students will learn about different types of interview methodologies, including elite and non-elite, structured, semi-structured, and intensive approaches. Over the course of the class, students will consider the types of questions most appropriately answered by interviews, the fundamentals of different sampling strategies, how to devise questionnaires, and how to use the information collected for both quantitative and qualitative analysis. We will also cover interview ethics, how to employ culturally sensitive techniques, and how to employ interviews in individual, group, and crowd situations.

2nd 5 weeks

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62520

Greg G Marfleet

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275), AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) or Psychology 200/201 or Sociology/Anthropology 239

POSC 330.00 The Complexity of Politics* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Laird 007

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62535

Greg G Marfleet

Theories of complexity and emergence relate to how large-scale collective properties and characteristics of a system can arise from the behavior and attributes of component parts. This course explores the relevance of these concepts, studied mainly in physics and biology, for the social sciences. Students will explore agent-based modeling to discover emergent properties of social systems through computer simulations they create using NetLogo software. Reading and seminar discussion topics include conflict and cooperation, electoral competition, transmission of culture and social networks. Completion of the stats/methods sequence is highly recommended.

POSC 361.00 Approaches to Development* 6 credits

Tun Myint

The meaning of "development" has been contested across multiple disciplines. The development and continual existence of past civilizations has been at the core of the discourse among those who study factors leading to the rise and fall of civilizations. Can we reconcile the meaning of development in economic terms with cultural, ecological, political, religious, social and spiritual terms? How can we measure it quantitatively? What and how do the UNDP Human Development Indexes and the World Development Reports measure? What are the exemplary cases that illustrate development? How do individual choices and patterns of livelihood activities link to development trends?

Extra Time Required

PSYC 221.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Sensation and Perception 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
9:00am12:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61797

Julia F Strand

This course accompanies Psychology 220. Students will replicate classical phenomena and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human perceptual processes. Psychology 221 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 220. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

PSYC 220 required

PSYC 221.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Sensation and Perception 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
1:00pm4:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61798

Julia F Strand

This course accompanies Psychology 220. Students will replicate classical phenomena and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human perceptual processes. Psychology 221 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 220. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

PSYC 220 required

PSYC 257.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Social Behavior and Interpersonal Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Olin 06

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61807

Sharon A Akimoto

Students will participate in the planning and replication of empirical studies of the social psychology of social behavior. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 256. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 256 and 257 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 256 required.

PSYC 257.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Social Behavior and Interpersonal Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Olin 06

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61808

Sharon A Akimoto

Students will participate in the planning and replication of empirical studies of the social psychology of social behavior. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 256. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 256 and 257 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 256 required.

PSYC 375.00 Language and Deception 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Olin 106

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61799

Mija M Van Der Wege

In this course we will examine deception and persuasion in language use. We will take up three main issues. The first is what it means to deceive and how people deceive others through language. What methods do they use, and how do these methods work? The second issue is why people deceive. What purposes do their deceptions serve in court, in advertising, in bureaucracies, in business transactions, and in everyday face-to-face conversation? The third issue is the ethics of deception. Is it legitimate to deceive others, and if so, when and why?

Prerequisite: Psychology 232, 234, 238 or Cognitive Science 236.

SOAN 114.00 Modern Families: An Introduction to the Sociology of the Family 6 credits

Liz Y Raleigh

What makes a family? How has the conception of kinship and the 'normal' family changed over the generations? In this introductory class, we examine these questions, drawing on a variety of course materials ranging from classic works in sociology to contemporary blogs on family life. The class focuses on diversity in family life, paying particular attention to the intersection between the family, race and ethnicity, and social class. We'll examine these issues at the micro and macro level, incorporating texts that focus on individuals' stories as well as demographics of the family.

SOAN 240.00 Methods of Social Research 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62357

Liz Y Raleigh

The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are considered. Students will demonstrate their knowledge by developing a research proposal that is implementable.

Prerequisite: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111; Sociology/Anthropology 239, Mathematics 215 or Statistics 120

STAT 120.01 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61466

Katie R St. Clair

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: STAT 120.WL1 (Synonym 61578)

STAT 120.02 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61467

Laura M Chihara

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: STAT 120.WL2 (Synonym 61579)

STAT 120.03 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61542

Steve T Scheirer

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 120.04 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm3:10pm4:20pm3:30pm4:30pm
Synonym: 61543

Deepak Bastola

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 220.00 Introduction to Data Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61544

Katie R St. Clair

(Formerly Mathematics 285) This course will cover the computational side of data analysis, including data acquisition, management, and visualization tools. Topics may include: data scraping, data wrangling, data visualization using packages such as ggplots, interactive graphics using tools such as Shiny, supervised and unsupervised classification methods, and understanding and visualizing spatial data. We will use the statistics software R in this course.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215), Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275)

Formerly Mathematics 285

STAT 230.00 Applied Regression Analysis 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61545

Deepak Bastola

(Formerly Mathematics 245) A second course in statistics covering simple linear regression, multiple regression and ANOVA, and logistic regression. Exploratory graphical methods, model building and model checking techniques will be emphasized with extensive use of statistical software to analyze real-life data.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215), Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275), Psychology 200, or AP Statistics Exam score of 4 or 5.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: STAT 230.WL0 (Synonym 61580)

STAT 250.00 Introduction to Statistical Inference 6 credits

Open: Size: 28, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

CMC 206

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:20pm
Synonym: 61553

Laura M Chihara

(Formerly Mathematics 275) Introduction to modern mathematical statistics. The mathematics underlying fundamental statistical concepts will be covered as well as applications of these ideas to real-life data. Topics include: resampling methods (permutation tests, bootstrap intervals), classical methods (parametric hypothesis tests and confidence intervals), parameter estimation, goodness-of-fit tests, regression, and Bayesian methods. The statistical package R will be used to analyze data sets.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 240 Probability (formerly Mathematics 265)

Formerly Mathematics 275

STAT 285.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

CMC 201

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61451

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 280) Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) and instructor permission

Formerly Mathematics 280

STAT 320.00 Time Series Analysis 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

CMC 319

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61554

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 315) Models and methods for characterizing dependence in data that are ordered in time. Emphasis on univariate, quantitative data observed over evenly spaced intervals. Topics include perspectives from both the time domain (e.g., autoregressive and moving average models, and their extensions) and the frequency domain (e.g., periodogram smoothing and parametric models for the spectral density).

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 and 250 (formerly Mathematics 245 and 275). Exposure to matrix algebra may be helpful but is not required

Formerly Mathematics 315

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