ENROLL Course Search

NOTE: There are some inconsistencies in the course listing data - ITS is looking into the cause.

Alternatives: For requirement lists, please refer to the current catalog. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the "Search for Classes" option in The Hub. If you have any other questions, please email registrar@carleton.edu.

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Your search for courses for 22/SP and with Curricular Exploration: HI found 47 courses.

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AFST 215.00 Contemporary Theory in Black Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62997

Eddie E O'Byrn

This course examines the work of a major theorist in the Black intellectual tradition within the last seventy years. Students are invited to take a dedicated dive into primary scholarship by focusing on a figure such as bell hooks, Derrick Bell, Angela Davis, Charles Mills, Saidiya Hartman, Frank Wilderson, Maya Angelou, Henry Louis Gates Jr, Audre Lorde, James Baldwin, Zora Neale Hurston, and/or Cornel West. Students should expect an opportunity to examine primary scholarship and build analytical skills to trace themes and methods. This year's focus will be on ethical, social, and political theory of bell hooks (1952 - 2021).

AMST 115.00 Introduction to American Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61934

Nancy J Cho

This overview of the "interdisciplinary discipline" of American Studies will focus on the ways American Studies engages with and departs from other scholarly fields of inquiry. We will study the stories of those who have been marginalized in the social, political, cultural, and economic life of the United States due to their class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, citizenship, and level of ability. We will explore contemporary American Studies concerns like racial and class formation, the production of space and place, the consumption and circulation of culture, and transnational histories.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: AMST 115.WL0 (Synonym 61935)

AMST 240.00 The Midwest and the American Imagination 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 61937

Elizabeth McKinsey

The history of American culture has always been shaped by a dialectic between the local and the universal, the regional and the national. The particular geography and history of the Midwest (the prairie, the plains, the old Northwest, Native Americans and white adventurers, settlers and immigrants) have shaped its livelihoods, its identities, its meanings. Focusing on the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this course will explore literature, art history, and the social and cultural history of the Midwest.

Extra Time Required

AMST 325.00 Labor and Identity in America 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61385

Christine E Castro

How have social categories (i.e., race, class, gender, sexuality) been constructed according to labor? How have people lived their identities through their labor? This course will focus on manual labor, with special attention to agricultural work, and will span from the Antebellum South to the present. We will examine how manual labor has functioned as a symbol of belonging in the nation. Throughout the course, we will emphasize lived experience--or, how people responded to cultural shifts, and made social or political change through their work--using oral histories, community archives, cultural productions and social customs in the workplace.

Extra Time Required

CLAS 227.00 Athens, Sparta, Persia and the Battle for Greece 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62266

Jordan R Rogers

Forged in the crucible of wars fought between cultures with diametrically opposed views on politics and society, the fifth century BC witnessed arts, philosophy, and science all flourish in thrilling new ways. The two radically different Greek states of Athens and Sparta first teamed up to defeat the invading Persian empire. While this shocking victory spurred their respective cultures to new heights, their political aspirations drove them to turn on each other and fight a series of wars over control of Greece--all the while with Persia waiting in the wings. We will study these events against the backdrop of the political, intellectual, and cultural achievements of Athens, Sparta and Persia, drawing on the rich body of literature and material culture from this period.

ENGL 285.00 Textual Technologies from Parchment to Pixel 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Laird 007

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62243

George G Shuffelton

As readers, we rarely consider the technologies, practices, and transactions that deliver us our texts. This course introduces students to the material study of writing, manuscripts, books, printing, and digital media. It attends to the processes of copying, revision, editing, and circulation; familiarizes students with the disciplines of descriptive bibliography, paleography, and textual criticism; and introduces the principles of editing, in both print and electronic media. It offers hands-on practice in most of these areas.

ENTS 307.00 Wilderness Field Studies: Grand Canyon 6 credits

George H Vrtis

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence focused on the study of wilderness in American society and culture. The course will begin with an Off-Campus Studies program at Grand Canyon National Park, where we will learn about the natural and human history of the Grand Canyon region, examine contemporary issues facing the park, meet with officials from the National Park Service and other local experts, conduct research, and experience the park through hiking and camping. The course will culminate in spring term with the completion and presentation of a major research project.

Prerequisite: History 306 and Acceptance in Wilderness Studies at the Grand Canyon OCS program

HIST 306 required previous winter term, Extra Time Required

FREN 208.07 Paris Program: Contemporary France: Cultures, Politics, Society 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60208

Scott D Carpenter

This course seeks to deepen students' knowledge of contemporary French culture through a pluridisciplinary approach, using multimedia (books, newspaper and magazine articles, videos, etc.) to generate discussion. It will also promote the practice of both oral and written French through exercises, debates, and oral presentations.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

Participation in Carleton OCS Paris Program

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 335

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 60442

Cathy Yandell

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 60443)

GERM 221.00 (re/ex)press yourself: Sexuality and Gender in Fin-de-Siècle Literature and Art 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 244

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61291

Juliane Schicker

In this course, we will explore literature and art of German-speaking countries around the topics of gender and sex(uality). We will focus on the years between 1880 and 1920, but also venture into more recent times. What was the image of men and women at the time and how did these images change or remain the same? How did science factor into these images? What was/is considered “normal” when it comes to sex(uality) and gender, and what German-speaking voices have been pushing against those norms? How did these voices use literature and art to reflect or criticize such norms? Texts and class discussions will be in English. 

In Translation

GWSS 289.00 Pleasure, Intimacy, Violence 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61376

Zenzele Isoke

This is an interdisciplinary course that explores how pleasure, intimacy, and violence are shaped by historic and ongoing processes of inequality in the United States. We will explore how our understandings of sexuality are influenced by discourses and practices of race and race-making in the U.S. by focusing on the relationship between micro-level (interpersonal) and macro-level (societal) violence. The topics of rape, family violence, and intimate partner violence will be examined from a structural vantage point, emphasizing the mutually constituting roles of gender, race, class, and nationality. The concepts of “pleasure” and “enjoyment” are foregrounded throughout the course.

GWSS 398.00 Capstone: Schooling Sex: History of Sex Education & Instruction 6 credits

Jayne A Swift

How did sex get into public schools? How did sexual practice and desire become an object of scientific inquiry? Why has sex education been a site for repeated social conflicts, and what do those conflicts tell us about gender, racial, and economic inequality in the United States? This course is for everyone who has ever questioned the official and unofficial curriculum of sex education. The course provides a cultural and intellectual history of sex education and instruction within the geographic region of the United States. Throughout we will examine the complex relationship between sexual knowledge, pedagogy, and systems of power.

HIST 123.00 U.S. Women's History Since 1877 6 credits

Annette R Igra

In the twentieth century women participated in the redefinition of politics and the state, sexuality and family life, and work and leisure as the United States became a modern, largely urban society. We will explore how the dimensions of race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality shaped diverse women's experiences of these historical changes. Topics will include: immigration, the expansion of the welfare system and the consumer economy, labor force segmentation and the world wars, and women's activism in civil rights, labor, peace and feminist movements.

HIST 141.00 Europe in the Twentieth Century 6 credits

David G Tompkins

This course explores developments in European history in a global context from the final decade of the nineteenth century through to the present. We will focus on the impact of nationalism, war, and revolution on the everyday experiences of women and men, and also look more broadly on the chaotic economic, political, social, and cultural life of the period. Of particular interest will be the rise of fascism and communism, and the challenge to Western-style liberal democracy, followed by the Cold War and communism’s collapse near the end of the century.

HIST 161.00 From Mughals to Mahatma Gandhi: An Introduction to Modern Indian History 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62459

Amna Khalid

An introductory survey course to familiarize students with some of the key themes and debates in the historiography of modern India. Beginning with an overview of Mughal rule in India, the main focus of the course is the colonial period. The course ends with a discussion of 1947: the hour of independence as well as the creation of two new nation-states, India and Pakistan. Topics include Oriental Despotism, colonial rule, nationalism, communalism, gender, caste and race. No prior knowledge of South Asian History required.

HIST 200.00 Historians for Hire 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62460

Antony E Adler

A two-credit course in which students work with faculty oversight to complete a variety of public history projects with community partners. Students will work on a research project requiring them to identify and analyze primary sources, draw conclusions from the primary source research, and share their research with the appropriate audience in an appropriate form. We meet once a week at Carleton to ensure students maintain professional standards and strong relationships in their work. Potential projects include educational programming, historical society archival work, and a variety of local history opportunities. 

Extra Time Required

HIST 233.00 The Byzantine World and Its Neighbors, 750-ca. 1453 6 credits

William L North

The Byzantine world (eighth-fifteenth centuries) was a zone of fascinating tensions, exchanges, and encounters. Through a wide variety of written and visual evidence, we will examine key features of its history and culture: the nature of government; piety and religious controversy; art and music; the evolving relations with the Latin West, Armenia, the Slavic North and West, and the Dar al-Islam (the Abbasids and Seljuk and Ottoman Turks); gender; economic life; and social relations. Extra time will be required for special events and a group project (ecumenical council).

Extra Time Required

HIST 238.00 The Viking World 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62467

Austin P Mason

In the popular imagination, Vikings are horn-helmeted, blood-thirsty pirates who raped and pillaged their way across medieval Europe. But the Norse did much more than loot, rape, and pillage; they cowed kings and fought for emperors, explored uncharted waters and settled the North Atlantic, and established new trade routes that revived European urban life. In this course, we will separate fact from fiction by critically examining primary source documents alongside archaeological, linguistic and place-name evidence. Students will share their insights with each other and the world through two major collaborative digital humanities projects over the course of the term.

HIST 260.00 The Making of the Modern Middle East 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62462

Adeeb Khalid

A survey of major political and social developments from the fifteenth century to the beginning of World War I. Topics include: state and society, the military and bureaucracy, religious minorities (Jews and Christians), and women in premodern Muslim societies; the encounter with modernity.

HIST 263.00 Plagues of Empire 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62578

Amna Khalid

The globalization of disease is often seen as a recent phenomenon aided by high-speed communication and travel. This course examines the history of the spread of infectious diseases by exploring the connection between disease, medicine and European imperial expansion. We consider the ways in which European expansion from 1500 onwards changed the disease landscape of the world and how pre-existing diseases in the tropics shaped and thwarted imperial ambitions. We will also question how far Western medicine can be seen as a benefit by examining its role in facilitating colonial expansion and constructing racial and gender difference.

HIST 282.07 African Diaspora in Arabia 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60213

Thabiti C Willis

This course offers a broad historical overview of African men's and women's experiences as religious, political, and military leaders, as merchants and poets, and in agricultural and maritime industries in Arabia. Situated primarily in Bahrain, with travel to Oman, the course will examine longstanding historical, cultural, and commercial exchanges between Africa and the Gulf from medieval times to the present day. The course will question the ideologies that assume that Africa and Arabia represent racial and cultural difference.

Prerequisite: 100 or 200 level Africana Studies or History course and participation on OCS program

Participation in Africa and Arabia OCS Program

HIST 284.07 History, Culture and Commerce Program: Heritage in Africa and Arabia 6 credits

Thabiti C Willis

Through lectures, readings, and extensive site visits to museums and archaeological sites, this course examines the rich cultural heritage of East Africa and Arabia. Students will investigate Persian, Arab, Indian, and Islamic sites in Zanzibar, Oman, and Bahrain, reflecting on the deep influence of the Indian Ocean on the region’s historical trading systems and modern-day relations. The course also examines the influence of various European colonial powers during the era in which they ruled or wielded influence. 

Prerequisite: 100 or 200 level Africana Studies or History course and participation on OCS program

Participation in Africa and Ararbia OCS program

HIST 285.07 History, Culture and Commerce Program: Critical Historical Research 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60215

Thabiti C Willis

This course focuses on ethnographic research and writing with an emphasis on the practice of fieldwork. Students will conduct group research projects that include actively guiding and evaluating the work of their peers. The content of these projects will include maritime activities, health, music, economics, and heritage. Students will learn the benefits and challenges of examining oral tradition, oral history, poetry, visual art, material culture, and embodied practice. Service or experiential learning is another major point of emphasis. Students will develop their ability to question their knowledge, method, evidence, interpretation, experience, ethics, and power. 

Prerequisite: 100 or 200 level Africana Studies or History course and participation on OCS program

Participation in OCS Africa and Arabia Program

HIST 287.00 From Alchemy to the Atom Bomb: The Scientific Revolution and the Making of the Modern World 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 62468

Antony E Adler

This course examines the growth of modern science since the Renaissance with an emphasis on the Scientific Revolution, the development of scientific methodology, and the emergence of new scientific disciplines. How might a history of science focused on scientific networks operating within society, rather than on individual scientists, change our understanding of “genius,” “progress,” and “scientific impartiality?” We will consider a range of scientific developments, treating science both as a body of knowledge and as a set of practices, and will gauge the extent to which our knowledge of the natural world is tied to who, when, and where such knowledge has been produced and circulated.

HIST 341.00 The Russian Revolution and its Global Legacies 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

The Russian revolution of 1917 was one of the seminal events of the twentieth century. It transformed much beyond Russia itself. This course will take stock of the event and its legacy. What was the Russian revolution? What was its place in the history of revolutions? How did it impact the world? How was it seen by those who made it and those who witnessed it? How have these evaluations changed over time? What sense can we make of it in the year of its centenary? The revolution was both an inspiration (to many revolutionary and national-liberation movements) and used as a tale of caution and admonition (by adversaries of the Soviet Union). The readings will put the Russian revolution in the broadest perspective of the twentieth century and its contested evaluations, from within the Soviet Union and beyond, from its immediate aftermath, through World War II, the Cold War, to the post-Soviet period. The course is aimed at all students interested in the history of the twentieth century and of the idea of the revolution.

Prerequisite: One course in Modern European History or instructor consent

IDSC 251.01 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
8:00pm9:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62568

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

IDSC 251.02 Windows on the Good Life 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62569

Laurence D Cooper, Alan Rubenstein

Human beings are always and everywhere challenged by the question: What should I do to spend my mortal time well? One way to approach this ultimate challenge is to explore some of the great cultural products of our civilization--works that are a delight to read for their wisdom and artfulness. This series of two-credit courses will explore a philosophical dialogue of Plato in the fall, a work from the Bible in the winter, and a pair of plays by Shakespeare in the spring. The course can be repeated for credit throughout the year and in subsequent years.

LTAM 398.00 Latin American Forum 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62605

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

This colloquium will explore specific issues or works in Latin American Studies through discussion of a common reading, public presentation, project, and/or performance that constitute the annual Latin American Forum. Students will be required to attend two meetings during the term to discuss the common reading or other material and must attend, without exception. All events of the Forum which take place during fourth week of spring term (on Friday afternoon and Saturday morning). A short integrative essay or report will be required at the end of the term. Intended as capstone for the Latin American Studies minor.

PHIL 116.00 Sensation, Induction, Abduction, Deduction, Seduction 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62197

Jason A Decker

In every academic discipline, we make theories and argue for and against them. This is as true of theology as of geology (and as true of phys ed as of physics). What are the resources we have available to us in making these arguments? It's tempting to split the terrain into (i) raw data, and (ii) rules of right reasoning for processing the data. The most obvious source of raw data is sense experience, and the most obvious candidates for modes of right reasoning are deduction, induction, and abduction. Some philosophers, however, think that sense perception is only one of several sources of raw data (perhaps we also have a faculty of pure intuition or maybe a moral sense), and others have doubted that we have any source of raw data at all. As for the modes of "right" reasoning, Hume famously worried about our (in)ability to justify induction, and others have had similar worries about abduction and even deduction. Can more be said on behalf of our most strongly held beliefs and belief-forming practices than simply that we find them seductive---that we are attracted to them; that they resonate with us? In this course, we'll use some classic historical and contemporary philosophical texts to help us explore these and related issues.

PHIL 123.00 Topics in Medical Ethics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 60405

Daniel M Groll

This course examines a variety of topics in medical ethics. We begin with a unit on pandemic ethics: Who should get ventilators when there aren't enough for everyone? Do medical providers have a duty to treat during a pandemic? We then turn to the question "When is someone dead?" and consider how different answers to that question affect arguments over organ procurement. Our third unit is on the place of race, and racial judgments, in medicine. Is there a place for racial judgments in medicine? Finally, we turn to the question of how to think about decision making in a clinical context: what values are at play? And how should we think about disagreements between clinicians and patients? What about disagreements between patient's past wishes and their current wishes? Not open to students who have taken Philosophy 222.

Sophomore Priority, not open to students what have taken Philosophy 222.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: PHIL 123.WL0 (Synonym 60406)

PHIL 218.00 Virtue Ethics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62591

Allison E Murphy

What is a good human life? Who is a good person? From the time of Plato and Aristotle onwards, many philosophers have thought about these questions in terms of two central ideas. Virtues, such as justice or courage, make us a certain type of person (they give us a certain character). Wisdom enables us to make good judgments about how to act. How do virtue and wisdom work together to produce a good human life? Is a good life the same as a happy life? We will reflect on these and related questions as we read texts from Alasdair MacIntyre, Philippa Foot, and other significant thinkers in the contemporary virtue ethics tradition. We will also consider the application of virtue ethics to specific areas, such as environmental ethics, as well as the parallels between Western virtue ethics and the tradition of Confucianism in ancient China.

Not open to students who have taken PHIL 320

PHIL 221.00 Philosophy of Law 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 62198

Anna Moltchanova

This course provides students with an opportunity to engage actively in a discussion of theoretical questions about law. We will consider the nature of law as it is presented by natural law theory, legal positivism and legal realism. Then we will deal with responsibility and punishment, and challenges to the idea of the primacy of individual rights from legal paternalism and moralism. We will next inquire into the explanations of why individuals should obey the law, and conditions under which civil disobedience is justified. Finally, we will discuss issues raised by feminist legal theory and some theories of minority rights.

PHIL 226.00 Love and Friendship 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62199

Anna Moltchanova

This course will consider various philosophical views on the nature of love and friendship. It will focus on both the history of philosophical thinking about these notions from Plato and Aristotle to the twentieth century and a variety of contemporary views on the meaning of love and friendship that derive their insight from the most recent studies of emotion, agency, action, rationality, moral value, and motivation. We will also look at the variations in the understanding of love and friendship among the members of the same culture and across cultures.

PHIL 228.00 Freedom and Alienation in Black American Philosophy 6 credits

Eddie E O'Byrn

The struggle of freedom against forms of alienation is both a historical and contemporary characteristic of Black/African-American philosophy. In this course we will explore how a variety of Black/African-American philosophers theorize these concepts. The aim of the course is to both offer resources for familiarizing students with African-American philosophers and develop an appreciation for critical philosophical voices in the Black intellectual tradition. The course will range from slave narratives, reconstruction, and civil rights to contemporary prison abolitionism, intersectionality, and afro-pessimism. The texts of the course will include: Angela Davis’ Lectures on Liberation, Frederick Douglass’ Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells Southern Horrors, George Yancy’s African-American Philosophers 17 Conversations, and Afro-Pessimism: An Introduction. As well as select articles from historical and contemporary Black/African-American philosophers.

PHIL 272.00 Early Modern Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62201

Douglas B Marshall

This course offers an introduction to major aspects of European theories of being and knowledge during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Key topics to be examined include:  the distinction between the mind and the body; the existence and nature of God; the relationship between cause and effect; the scope and nature of human knowledge. We will place a special emphasis on understanding the philosophical thought of René Descartes, Anne Conway, G. W. Leibniz, and David Hume. Two themes will recur throughout the course: first, the evolving relationships between philosophy and the sciences of the period; second, the philosophical contributions of women in the early modern era.

PHIL 319.00 Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

CMC 306

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61441

Laura M Ruetsche

Quantum theories of matter are astonishingly successful—and deeply mysterious. Niels Bohr is said to have remarked that “those who are not shocked when they first come across quantum theory cannot possibly have understood it.” Richard Feynman said, “I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics.” Some quantum weirdness is unavoidable — it appears, for instance, that wholes really are more than the sum of their parts and that nature is non-local in a surprising way. Other weirdnesses are features of some ways of understanding quantum mechanics but not others: indeterminism, randomness, branching worlds, surprising connections between the physical and the mental. We will look at some currently popular approaches: Bohm's deterministic theory, spontaneous collapse theories, many-worlds and many-minds theories.

Prerequisite: One Previous Philosophy course or instructor consent

POSC 160.00 Political Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62518

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions.

POSC 256.00 Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62531

Laurence D Cooper

Nietzsche understood himself to be living at a moment of great endings: the exhaustion of modernity, the self-undermining of rationalism, the self-overcoming of morality--in short, stunningly, the "death of God." He regarded these endings as an unprecedented disaster for humanity but also as an unprecedented opportunity, and he pointed the way to a new ideal and a new culture that would be life-affirming and life-enhancing. This course will center on close study of Beyond Good and Evil, perhaps Nietzsche's most beautiful book and probably his most political one. Selections from some of his other books will also be assigned. 

POSC 329.00 Reinventing Humanism: A Dialogue with Tzvetan Todorov 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 60403

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Humanism is today severely criticized for reducing humanity to Western culture and history and for its aggressive control and destruction of the non-human. Concomitantly, the history of the twentieth century reveals a growing totalitarian and anti-humanistic tendency in (post)modern societies and their politics, to replace individual agency, freedom, and responsibility with systemic solutions. The course explores, through a dialogue with the work of the French thinker, Tzvetan Todorov, how being human could be reinvented today in ways that avoid the moral and political pitfalls of the previous humanistic tradition, without devaluing, in the process, the idea of a shared humanity.

RELG 110.00 Understanding Religion 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62393

Sonja G Anderson

How can we best understand the role of religion in the world today, and how should we interpret the meaning of religious traditions -- their texts and practices -- in history and culture? This class takes an exciting tour through selected themes and puzzles related to the fascinating and diverse expressions of religion throughout the world. From politics and pop culture, to religious philosophies and spiritual practices, to rituals, scriptures, gender, religious authority, and more, students will explore how these issues emerge in a variety of religions, places, and historical moments in the U.S. and across the globe.

RELG 121.00 Introduction to Christianity 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62394

Caleb S Hendrickson

This course will trace the history of Christianity from its origins in the villages of Palestine, to its emergence as the official religion of the Roman Empire, and through its evolution and expansion as the world's largest religion. The course will focus on events, persons, and ideas that have had the greatest impact on the history of Christianity, and examine how this tradition has evolved in different ways in response to different needs, cultures, and tensions--political and otherwise--around the world. This is an introductory course. No familiarity with the Bible, Christianity, or the academic study of religion is presupposed.

RELG 122.00 Introduction to Islam 6 credits

Kambiz GhaneaBassiri

This course is a general introduction to Islam as a prophetic religious tradition. It explores the different ways Muslims have interpreted and put into practice the prophetic message of Muhammad through analyses of varying theological, legal, political, mystical, and literary writings as well as through Muslims’ lived histories. These analyses aim for students to develop a framework for explaining the sources and vocabularies through which historically specific human experiences and understandings of the world have been signified as Islamic. The course will focus primarily on the early and modern periods of Islamic history.

RELG 219.00 Religious Law, Il/Legal Religions 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61387

Chumie Juni

The concept of law plays a central role in religion, and the concept of religion plays a central role in law. We often use the word ‘law’ to describe obligatory religious practices. But is that ‘law,’ as compared with state law? Legal systems in the U.S. and Europe make laws that protect religious people, and that protect governments from religion. But what does ‘religion’ mean in a legal context? And how do implicit notions of religious law affect how judges deal with religion? We will explore these questions using sources drawn from contemporary religions and recent legal disputes.

RELG 237.00 Yoga: Religion, History, Practice 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

This class will immerse students in the study of yoga from its first textual representations to its current practice around the world. Transnationally, yoga has been unyoked from religion. But the Sanskrit root yuj means to “add,” “join,” or “unite”—and in Indian philosophy and practice it was: a method of devotion; a way to “yoke” the body/mind; a means to unite with Ultimate Reality; a form of concentration and meditation. We will concentrate on texts dating back thousands of years, from Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras to the Bhagavad Gita—and popular texts of today. Come prepared to wear loose clothing.

RELG 282.00 Samurai: Ethics of Death and Loyalty 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62402

Asuka Sango

This course explores the history of samurai since the emergence of warrior class in medieval times, to the modern developments of samurai ethics as the icon of Japanese national identity. Focusing on its connection with Japanese religion and culture, we will investigate the origins of the purported samurai ideals of loyalty, honor, self-sacrifice, and death. In addition to regular class sessions, there will be a weekly kyudo (Japanese archery) practice on Wednesday evening (7-9 pm), which will enable students to study samurai history in context through gaining first-hand experience in the ritualized practice of kyudo.

Extra Time Required

RELG 285.00 Islam in America: Race, Religion and Politics 6 credits

Kambiz GhaneaBassiri

This course examines the history of Islam in America from the colonial period to the present. It contextualizes American Islam at the cross section of American religious history and modern Islamic history. While primarily focused on the politics of race and religion in America, the course also explores the influence of comparative theology and religious studies on conceptions of religious diversity; the relationship between race, religion and ideas of progress; the role of Islam in the civil rights movement and in nationalist movements in Muslim-majority societies; and the rise of militant Islam as a matter of global concern.

RELG 362.00 Spirit Possession 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

This course considers spirit possession in relation to religion, gender, and agency. Through surveying a number of works on spirit possession--recent and past, theoretical and ethnographic--we will analyze representations of the female subject in particular and arguments about agency that attend these representations. This class will explicitly look at post-colonial accounts of spirit possession and compare them to Euro-American Christian conceptions of personhood. We will consider how these Euro-Christian conceptions might undergird secular-liberal constructions of agency, and contribute to feminist ideas about the proper female subject.

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