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Your search for courses for 22/SP and in AND 329 found 8 courses.

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CHEM 224.54 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61706

Deborah S Gross

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 224.59 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61707

Deborah S Gross

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CS 201.01 Data Structures 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 60516

Eric C Alexander

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 201.WL1 (Synonym 60518)

CS 251.00 Programming Languages: Design and Implementation 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 60521

David R Musicant

What makes a programming language like "Python" or like "Java"? This course will look past superficial properties (like indentation) and into the soul of programming languages. We will explore a variety of topics in programming language construction and design: syntax and semantics, mechanisms for parameter passing, typing, scoping, and control structures. Students will expand their programming experience to include other programming paradigms, including functional languages like Scheme and ML.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 or instructor permission

CS 254.00 Computability and Complexity 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 35, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62543

James O Ryan

An introduction to the theory of computation. What problems can and cannot be solved efficiently by computers? What problems cannot be solved by computers, period? Topics include formal models of computation, including finite-state automata, pushdown automata, and Turing machines; formal languages, including regular expressions and context-free grammars; computability and uncomputability; and computational complexity, particularly NP-completeness.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 and Computer Science 202 (Mathematics 236 will be accepted in lieu of Computer Science 202)

IDSC 238.00 Vaccines: Science, Skeptics, and Stakeholders 6 credits

Closed: Size: 36, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61269

Ken B Abrams, Michael T Hemesath, Debby R Walser-Kuntz

Vaccines are often touted as one of humankind’s greatest biomedical achievements. They have undoubtedly prevented hundreds of millions of deaths from infectious diseases since their discovery. Yet, there remain many obstacles that prevent their wider development and dissemination. Among these are the technological challenges associated with vaccine development, the well funded anti-vaccination movements that often thrive on and spread misinformation, and economic hurdles that affect the production and equitable distribution of vaccines. Through an interdisciplinary lens that incorporates material from biology, psychology, and economics, this course will allow students to reach an integrated understanding of vaccines.  

PSYC 220.00 Sensation and Perception 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 35, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61796

Julia F Strand

We will address the question of how humans acquire information from the world to support action, learning, belief, choice, and the host of additional mental states that comprise the subject matter of psychology. In other words "How do we get the outside inside?" We will initially consider peripheral anatomical structures (e.g. the eye) and proceed through intermediate levels of sensory coding and transmission to cover the brain regions associated with each of the major senses. Readings will include primary sources and a text. In addition to exams and papers, students will conduct an investigation into an area of personal interest. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor consent

PSYC 254.00 Psychopathology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61805

Ken B Abrams

This course will focus on causal factors and clinical presentations of mental disorders, such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, dissociative disorders, and psychotic disorders, among others. We will use an integrative approach that incorporates psychological, biological, interpersonal, and sociocultural perspectives. Methods of assessment and treatment will also at times be discussed.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission.

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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