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Your search for courses for 22/SP and in LEIG 304 found 6 courses.

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AFST 215.00 Contemporary Theory in Black Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62997

Eddie E O'Byrn

This course examines the work of a major theorist in the Black intellectual tradition within the last seventy years. Students are invited to take a dedicated dive into primary scholarship by focusing on a figure such as bell hooks, Derrick Bell, Angela Davis, Charles Mills, Saidiya Hartman, Frank Wilderson, Maya Angelou, Henry Louis Gates Jr, Audre Lorde, James Baldwin, Zora Neale Hurston, and/or Cornel West. Students should expect an opportunity to examine primary scholarship and build analytical skills to trace themes and methods. This year's focus will be on ethical, social, and political theory of bell hooks (1952 - 2021).

CS 352.00 Advanced Algorithms 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62001

David Liben-Nowell

A second course on designing and analyzing efficient algorithms to solve computational problems. We will survey some algorithmic design techniques that apply broadly throughout computer science, including discussion of wide-ranging applications. A sampling of potential topics: approximation algorithms (can we efficiently compute near-optimal solutions even when finding exact solutions is computationally intractable?); randomized algorithms (does flipping coins help in designing faster/simpler algorithms?); online algorithms (how do we analyze an algorithm that needs to make decisions before the entire input arrives?); advanced data structures; complexity theory. As time and interest permit, we will mix recently published algorithmic papers with classical results.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 252 or instructor permission

PE 332.00 Foundations of Sport Psychology and Performance Mentality 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 63000

Jessica J Mueller

Research shows that the most successful athletes are those who are able to think consciously and engage differently than others before, during, and after competition. Like any other life skill, thinking differently and embracing active mindfulness takes training, a willingness to learn, and dedicated hard work. This course is designed to help students and athletes think differently about various aspects of training and competition, ultimately using these skills as they apply to sport, functioning in team environments, and most importantly to the other areas of their lives outside of athletics during and beyond their time at Carleton.

PHIL 116.00 Sensation, Induction, Abduction, Deduction, Seduction 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

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Synonym: 62197

Jason A Decker

In every academic discipline, we make theories and argue for and against them. This is as true of theology as of geology (and as true of phys ed as of physics). What are the resources we have available to us in making these arguments? It's tempting to split the terrain into (i) raw data, and (ii) rules of right reasoning for processing the data. The most obvious source of raw data is sense experience, and the most obvious candidates for modes of right reasoning are deduction, induction, and abduction. Some philosophers, however, think that sense perception is only one of several sources of raw data (perhaps we also have a faculty of pure intuition or maybe a moral sense), and others have doubted that we have any source of raw data at all. As for the modes of "right" reasoning, Hume famously worried about our (in)ability to justify induction, and others have had similar worries about abduction and even deduction. Can more be said on behalf of our most strongly held beliefs and belief-forming practices than simply that we find them seductive---that we are attracted to them; that they resonate with us? In this course, we'll use some classic historical and contemporary philosophical texts to help us explore these and related issues.

PHIL 228.00 Freedom and Alienation in Black American Philosophy 6 credits

Eddie E O'Byrn

The struggle of freedom against forms of alienation is both a historical and contemporary characteristic of Black/African-American philosophy. In this course we will explore how a variety of Black/African-American philosophers theorize these concepts. The aim of the course is to both offer resources for familiarizing students with African-American philosophers and develop an appreciation for critical philosophical voices in the Black intellectual tradition. The course will range from slave narratives, reconstruction, and civil rights to contemporary prison abolitionism, intersectionality, and afro-pessimism. The texts of the course will include: Angela Davis’ Lectures on Liberation, Frederick Douglass’ Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells Southern Horrors, George Yancy’s African-American Philosophers 17 Conversations, and Afro-Pessimism: An Introduction. As well as select articles from historical and contemporary Black/African-American philosophers.

PHIL 272.00 Early Modern Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62201

Douglas B Marshall

This course offers an introduction to major aspects of European theories of being and knowledge during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Key topics to be examined include:  the distinction between the mind and the body; the existence and nature of God; the relationship between cause and effect; the scope and nature of human knowledge. We will place a special emphasis on understanding the philosophical thought of René Descartes, Anne Conway, G. W. Leibniz, and David Hume. Two themes will recur throughout the course: first, the evolving relationships between philosophy and the sciences of the period; second, the philosophical contributions of women in the early modern era.

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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