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Your search for courses for 22/WI and with code: CCSTENCTR found 10 courses.

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ENGL 251.00 Contemporary Indian Fiction 6 credits

Arnab Chakladar

Contemporary Indian writers, based either in India or abroad, have become significant figures in the global literary landscape. This can be traced to the publication of Salman Rushdie's second novel, Midnight's Children in 1981. We will begin with that novel and read some of the other notable works of fiction of the following decades. The class will provide both a thorough grounding in the contemporary Indian literary scene as well as an introduction to some concepts in post-colonial studies.

HIST 165.00 From Young Turks to Arab Revolutions: A Cultural History of the Modern Middle East 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62450

Adeeb Khalid

This course provides a basic introduction to the history of the wider Muslim world from the eighteenth century to the present. We will discuss the cultural and religious diversity of the Muslim world and its varied interactions with modernity. We will find that the history of the Muslim world is inextricably linked to that of its neighbors, and we will encounter colonialism, anti-colonialism, nationalism, and socialism, as well as a variety of different Islamic movements.

HIST 184.00 Colonial West Africa 6 credits

Thabiti C Willis

This course surveys the history of West Africa during the colonial period, 1860-1960. It offers an introduction to the roles that Islam and Christianity played in establishing and maintaining colonial rule. It looks at the role of colonialism in shaping African ethnic identities and introducing new gender roles. In addition, we will examine the transition from slave labor to wage labor, and its role in exacerbating gender, generation, and class divisions among West Africans. The course also highlights some of the ritual traditions and cultural movements that flourished in response to colonial rule.

HIST 270.00 Nuclear Nations: India and Pakistan as Rival Siblings 6 credits

Amna Khalid

At the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947 India and Pakistan, two new nation states emerged from the shadow of British colonialism. This course focuses on the political trajectories of these two rival siblings and looks at the ways in which both states use the other to forge antagonistic and belligerent nations. While this is a survey course it is not a comprehensive overview of the history of the two countries. Instead it covers some of the more significant moments of rupture and violence in the political history of the two states. The first two-thirds of the course offers a top-down, macro overview of these events and processes whereas the last third examines the ways in which people experienced these developments. We use the lens of gender to see how the physical body, especially the body of the woman, is central to the process of nation building. We will consider how women’s bodies become sites of contestation and how they are disciplined and policed by the postcolonial state(s).

POSC 238.07 Sport & Globalization London/Seville Pgm: Globalization and Development: Lessons from Int'l Football 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60200

Bob S Carlson

This course uses international football (soccer) as a lens to analyze topics in globalization, such as immigration and labor, inequality, foreign investment, trade in services, and intellectual property. Students will be presented with key debates in these areas and then use cases from international football as illustrations. Focusing on the two wealthiest leagues in Europe, the English Premier League and the Spanish Liga, students will address key issues in the study of globalization and development, and in doing so enhance their understanding of the world, sports, and sport's place in the world.

Participation in Carleton OCS London & Seville Program

POSC 247.00 Comparative Nationalism 6 credits

Dev Gupta

Nationalism is an ideology that political actors have frequently harnessed to support a wide variety of policies ranging from intensive economic development to genocide. But what is nationalism? Where does it come from? And what gives it such emotional and political power? This course investigates competing ideas about the sources of nationalism, its evolution, and its political uses in state building, legitimation, development, and war. We will consider both historic examples of nationalism, as well as contemporary cases drawn from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the United States.

RELG 110.00 Understanding Religion 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62388

Caleb S Hendrickson

How can we best understand the role of religion in the world today, and how should we interpret the meaning of religious traditions -- their texts and practices -- in history and culture? This class takes an exciting tour through selected themes and puzzles related to the fascinating and diverse expressions of religion throughout the world. From politics and pop culture, to religious philosophies and spiritual practices, to rituals, scriptures, gender, religious authority, and more, students will explore how these issues emerge in a variety of religions, places, and historical moments in the U.S. and across the globe.

RELG 155.00 Hinduism: An Introduction 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

Hinduism is the world's third-largest religion (or, as some prefer, “way of life”), with about 1.2 billion followers. It is also one of its oldest, with roots dating back at least 3500 years. “Hinduism,” however, is a loosely defined, even contested term, designating the wide variety of beliefs and practices of the majority of the people of South Asia. This survey course introduces students to this great variety, including social structures (such as the caste system), rituals and scriptures, mythologies and epics, philosophies, life practices, politics, poetry, sex, gender, Bollywood, and—lest we forget—some 330 million gods and goddesses.

RUSS 205.00 Russian in Cultural Contexts 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 242

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 60477

Anna M Dotlibova

In this course students continue to develop skills of narration, listening comprehension, and writing, while exploring issues of contemporary Russian life and consciousness. The issues are examined from the position of two cultures: American and Russian. The course draws on a variety of sources for reading and viewing, including the periodic press, film, and music.

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent

SPAN 242.00 Introduction to Latin American Literature 6 credits

Silvia López

An introductory course to reading major texts in Spanish provides an historical survey of the literary movements within Latin American literature from the pre-Hispanic to the contemporary period. Recommended as a foundation course for further study. Not open to seniors.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency

Not open to seniors

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