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Your search for courses for 22/WI and with code: EUSTTRANNATL found 17 courses.

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ARTH 101.00 Introduction to Art History I 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61531

Jessica F Keating

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from antiquity through the "Middle Ages." The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, sacred spaces, images of the gods, imperial portraiture, and domestic decoration.

ARTH 172.00 Modern Art: 1890-1945 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61532

Ross K Elfline

This course explores developments in the visual arts, architecture, and theory in Europe and America between 1890 and 1945. The major Modernist artists and movements that sought to revolutionize vision, culture, and experience, from Symbolism to Surrealism, will be considered. The impact of World War I, the Great Depression, and the rise of fascism will be examined as well for their devastation of the Modernist dream of social-cultural renewal. Lectures will be integrated with discussions of artists' theoretical writings and group manifestoes, such as those of the Futurists, Dadaists, Surrealists, Constructivists, and DeStijl, in addition to select secondary readings.

ARTH 235.00 Revival, Revelation, and Re-animation: The Art of Europe's "Renaissance" 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61534

Jessica F Keating

This course examines European artistic production in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and the Netherlands from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century. The aim of the course is to introduce diverse forms of artistic production, as well as to analyze the religious, social, and political role of art in the period. While attending to the specificities of workshop practices, production techniques, materials, content, and form of the objects under discussion, the course also interrogates the ways in which these objects are and, at times, are not representative of the "Renaissance."

Prerequisite: One Art History course or instructor permission

ARTH 263.07 European Architectural Studies Program: Prehistory to Postmodernism 6 credits

Baird E Jarman

This course surveys the history of European architecture while emphasizing firsthand encounters with actual structures. Students visit outstanding examples of major transnational styles--including Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Moorish, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical and Modernist buildings--along with regionally specific styles, such as Spanish Plateresque, English Tudor and Catalan Modernisme. Cultural and technological changes affecting architectural practices are emphasized along with architectural theory, ranging from Renaissance treatises to Modernist manifestos. Students also visit buildings that resist easy classification and that raise topics such as spatial appropriation, stylistic hybridity, and political symbolism.

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS Architectural Studies Program

Participation in Carleton OCS Architectural Studies Program

ARTH 264.07 European Architectural Studies Program: Managing Monuments: Issues in Cultural Heritage Practice 3 credits

Closed: Size: 27, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 59772

Baird E Jarman

This course explores the theory and practice of cultural resource management by investigating how various architectural sites and urban historic districts operate. Students will consider cultural, financial, ethical and pedagogical aspects of contemporary tourism practices within a historical framework that roots the travel industry alongside religious pilgrimage customs and the aristocratic tradition of the Grand Tour. Interacting with professionals who help oversee architectural landmarks and archaeological sites, students will analyze and assess initiatives at various locations, ranging from educational programs and preservation plans to sustainability efforts and repatriation debates.

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS Architectural Studies Program

Participation in OCS Architectural Studies Program

CAMS 211.00 Film History II 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61977

Dimitrios Pavlounis

This course charts the continued rise and development of cinema 1948-1968, focusing on monuments of world cinema and their industrial, cultural, aesthetic and political contexts. Topics include postwar Hollywood, melodrama, authorship, film style, labor strikes, runaway production, censorship, communist paranoia and the blacklist, film noir, Italian neorealism, widescreen aesthetics, the French New Wave, art cinema, Fellini, Bergman, the Polish School, the Czech New Wave, Japanese and Indian cinema, political filmmaking in the Third World, and the New Hollywood Cinema. Requirements include class attendance and participation, readings, evening film screenings, and various written assignments and exams.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

ENGL 114.00 Introduction to Medieval Narrative 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62767

George G Shuffelton

This class will focus on three of the most popular and closely connected modes of narrative enjoyed by medieval audiences: the epic, the romance, and the saint's life. Readings, drawn primarily from the English and French traditions, will include BeowulfThe Song of Roland, the Arthurian romances of Chretien de Troyes, and legends of St. Alexis and St. Margaret. We will consider how each narrative mode influenced the other, as we encounter warriors and lovers who suffer like saints, and saints who triumph like warriors and lovers. Readings will be in translation or highly accessible modernizations.

ENGL 203.00 Other Worlds of Medieval English Literature 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62227

George G Shuffelton

When medieval writers imagined worlds beyond their own, what did they see?  This course will examine depictions of the afterlife, the East, and magical realms of the imagination. We will read romances, saints' lives, and a masterpiece of pseudo-travel literature that influenced both Shakespeare and Columbus, alongside contemporary theories of postcolonialism, gender and race. We will visit the lands of the dead and the undead, and compare gruesome punishments and heavenly rewards. We will encounter dog-headed men, Amazons, cannibals, armies devoured by hippopotami, and roasted geese that fly onto waiting dinner tables. Be prepared. Readings in Middle English and in modern translations.

HIST 137.00 Early Medieval Worlds in Transformation 6 credits

William L North

In this course we will explore a variety of distinct but interconnected worlds that existed between ca.300 and ca.1050. We will interrogate primary sources, especially written and visual materials, as they bear witness to people forming and transforming political, social, religious, and cultural values, ideas and structures. We will work to understand how communities adapt to new conditions and challenges while maintaining links with and repurposing the lifeways, ideas, and material cultures of the past. We will watch as new and different groups and institutions come to power, and how the existing peoples and structures respond and change. Projects in this course will build capacity to interpret difficult primary documents, formulate research questions, and build arguments that combine rigor and humane sympathy.

HIST 244.00 The Enlightenment and Its Legacies 6 credits

Susannah R Ottaway

The Enlightenment: praised for its role in promoting human rights, condemned for its role in underwriting colonialism; lauded for its cosmopolitanism, despised for its Eurocentrism... how should we understand the cultural and intellectual history of the Enlightenment, and what are its legacies? This course starts by examining essential Enlightenment texts by philosophes such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau, and then the second half of the term focuses on unpacking the Enlightenment's entanglements with modern ideas around topics such as religion, race, sex, gender, colonialism etc.

MUSC 215.00 Western Music and its Social Ecosystems, 1830-Present 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62815

Brooke H McCorkle

This class expands students’ understanding of Western music by concentrating on the social ecosystem of performers, musicians, and consumer-listeners of both past and present. Students will explore broad themes in music history, such as concepts of sound, materiality, religion, politics, embodiment, and narrative. Through a variety of assignments including listening analyses, creative responses, and a final project, students will develop critical thinking, research, and communication skills to help them be successful in their various musical endeavors.

Prerequisite: Ability to read Western Music Notation recommended

PE 338.07 Sports and Globalization in London and Seville: Global Athletics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 60199

Bob S Carlson

With their rich history and current success, English and Spanish sport will serve as a framework to examine the emergence of contemporary athletics and current issues facing participants, coaches, administrators, and spectators. The course will explore the world of sport and specifically football (soccer) from a generalist perspective. London and Seville will provide rich and unique opportunities to learn how sport and society intersect. With classroom activities, site visits, field trips to matches, museums, and stadiums students will examine sport from an historical and cultural perspective while keeping in mind how our globalized world impacts sport. Lastly, we will seek to understand ways athletics can break down barriers and create understanding between others.

Participation in Carleton OCS London & Seville Program

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62496

Juan Diego Prieto

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 62497)

POSC 238.07 Sport & Globalization London/Seville Pgm: Globalization and Development: Lessons from Int'l Football 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60200

Bob S Carlson

This course uses international football (soccer) as a lens to analyze topics in globalization, such as immigration and labor, inequality, foreign investment, trade in services, and intellectual property. Students will be presented with key debates in these areas and then use cases from international football as illustrations. Focusing on the two wealthiest leagues in Europe, the English Premier League and the Spanish Liga, students will address key issues in the study of globalization and development, and in doing so enhance their understanding of the world, sports, and sport's place in the world.

Participation in Carleton OCS London & Seville Program

POSC 247.00 Comparative Nationalism 6 credits

Dev Gupta

Nationalism is an ideology that political actors have frequently harnessed to support a wide variety of policies ranging from intensive economic development to genocide. But what is nationalism? Where does it come from? And what gives it such emotional and political power? This course investigates competing ideas about the sources of nationalism, its evolution, and its political uses in state building, legitimation, development, and war. We will consider both historic examples of nationalism, as well as contemporary cases drawn from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the United States.

POSC 255.00 Post-Modern Political Thought 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62513

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

The thought and practice of the modern age have been found irredeemably oppressive, alienating, dehumanizing, and/or exhausted by a number of leading philosophic thinkers in recent years. In this course we will explore the critiques and alternative visions offered by a variety of post-modern thinkers, including Nietzsche (in many ways the first post-modern), Heidegger, Foucault, and Derrida.

SPAN 318.00 Islamic Spain 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62587

Humberto R Huergo

Muslims conquered Spain in 711 and lived in the country roughly until 1614. This course will examine the Islamic origins of Spain from a variety of disciplines, including literature, religion, history, and art history. Topics covered include:Hispano-Arabic literature, the fall of Granada, the repression of Moriscos under Philip II, aljamiado literature (literature written in Spanish with Arabic characters), the expulsion of Moriscos, and the diaspora in Tunisia. We will also devote two weeks to the study of the representation of Turks, Muslims, and Moriscos in Cervantes’ plays and novels, including several chapters of his famous Don Quixote. All texts are in Spanish, including Arab sources by Ibn Hazm, Wallada, Muhya, and other Hispano-Arabic and Morisco writers.  

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

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