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Your search for courses for 22/WI and with code: HISTMODERN found 12 courses.

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HIST 122.00 U.S. Women's History to 1877 6 credits

Annette R Igra

Gender, race, and class shaped women's participation in the arenas of work, family life, culture, and politics in the United States from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century. We will examine diverse women's experiences of colonization, industrialization, slavery and Reconstruction, religion, sexuality and reproduction, and social reform. Readings will include both primary and secondary sources, as well as historiographic articles outlining major frameworks and debates in the field of women's history.

HIST 156.00 History of Modern Korea 6 credits

Seungjoo Yoon

A comparative historical survey on the development of Korean society and culture from the nineteenth century to the present. Key themes include colonialism and war, economic growth, political transformation, socio-cultural changes, and historical memory. Issues involving divided Korea will be examined in the contexts of post-colonialism and Cold War. Students are also expected to develop skills to analyze key historical moments from relevant primary sources against broader historiographical contexts.

HIST 165.00 From Young Turks to Arab Revolutions: A Cultural History of the Modern Middle East 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62450

Adeeb Khalid

This course provides a basic introduction to the history of the wider Muslim world from the eighteenth century to the present. We will discuss the cultural and religious diversity of the Muslim world and its varied interactions with modernity. We will find that the history of the Muslim world is inextricably linked to that of its neighbors, and we will encounter colonialism, anti-colonialism, nationalism, and socialism, as well as a variety of different Islamic movements.

HIST 177.00 Borderlands in Latin American History 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61296

Jennifer L Schaefer

Fluid borders, imagined frontiers, and contested territories have shaped Latin American history from the colonial period through the present. The course asks, how did people cross borders and form new identities? How did they engage with the landscape around them? Focusing on regions including Patagonia, the Gran Chaco, the Brazilian Sertão, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, this course explores the complexity of regional, national, and transnational identities. Course themes include the relationship between mapping and power, peoples’ relationship with the environment, the enslavement of African and Indigenous peoples in frontier regions, conflicts over contested regions, and processes of nation-building.

HIST 184.00 Colonial West Africa 6 credits

Thabiti C Willis

This course surveys the history of West Africa during the colonial period, 1860-1960. It offers an introduction to the roles that Islam and Christianity played in establishing and maintaining colonial rule. It looks at the role of colonialism in shaping African ethnic identities and introducing new gender roles. In addition, we will examine the transition from slave labor to wage labor, and its role in exacerbating gender, generation, and class divisions among West Africans. The course also highlights some of the ritual traditions and cultural movements that flourished in response to colonial rule.

HIST 200.00 Historians for Hire 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62451

Susannah R Ottaway

A two-credit course in which students work with faculty oversight to complete a variety of public history projects with community partners. Students will work on a research project requiring them to identify and analyze primary sources, draw conclusions from the primary source research, and share their research with the appropriate audience in an appropriate form. We meet once a week at Carleton to ensure students maintain professional standards and strong relationships in their work. Potential projects include educational programming, historical society archival work, and a variety of local history opportunities. 

Extra Time Required

HIST 242.00 Communism, Cold War, Collapse: Russia Since Stalin 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62452

Adeeb Khalid

In this course we will explore the history of Russia and other former Soviet states in the period after the death of Stalin, exploring the workings of the communist system and the challenges it faced internally and internationally. We will investigate the nature of the late Soviet state and look at the different trajectories Russia and other post-Soviet states have followed since the end of the Soviet Union.

HIST 244.00 The Enlightenment and Its Legacies 6 credits

Susannah R Ottaway

The Enlightenment: praised for its role in promoting human rights, condemned for its role in underwriting colonialism; lauded for its cosmopolitanism, despised for its Eurocentrism... how should we understand the cultural and intellectual history of the Enlightenment, and what are its legacies? This course starts by examining essential Enlightenment texts by philosophes such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau, and then the second half of the term focuses on unpacking the Enlightenment's entanglements with modern ideas around topics such as religion, race, sex, gender, colonialism etc.

HIST 270.00 Nuclear Nations: India and Pakistan as Rival Siblings 6 credits

Amna Khalid

At the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947 India and Pakistan, two new nation states emerged from the shadow of British colonialism. This course focuses on the political trajectories of these two rival siblings and looks at the ways in which both states use the other to forge antagonistic and belligerent nations. While this is a survey course it is not a comprehensive overview of the history of the two countries. Instead it covers some of the more significant moments of rupture and violence in the political history of the two states. The first two-thirds of the course offers a top-down, macro overview of these events and processes whereas the last third examines the ways in which people experienced these developments. We use the lens of gender to see how the physical body, especially the body of the woman, is central to the process of nation building. We will consider how women’s bodies become sites of contestation and how they are disciplined and policed by the postcolonial state(s).

HIST 273.00 Disease and Health in Latin American History 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61297

Jennifer L Schaefer

Yellow fever, malaria, chagas, dengue, tuberculosis, and cholera preoccupied physicians, scientists, politicians, and urban planners in Latin America from the colonial period through the present. This course explores how ideas about health and disease were connected to race, ethnicity, and status during the colonial period and linked with nation-building during the nineteenth century. It examines how health and disease intertwined with imperialist projects and intersected with modernization campaigns during the twentieth century. It also considers the relationship between medical institutions, physicians, midwives, and healers. Other course topics include how perceptions about health, including mental and reproductive health, shaped people’s experiences.

HIST 306.00 American Wilderness 6 credits

George H Vrtis

To many Americans, wild lands are among the nation’s most treasured places. Yellowstone, Yosemite, Mount Rainier, Joshua Tree, Grand Canyon – the names alone stir the heart, the mind, and the imagination. But where do those thoughts and feelings come from, and how have they both reflected and shaped American culture, society, and nature over the last three centuries? These are the central issues and questions that we will pursue in this seminar and in its companion course, ENTS 307 Wilderness Field Studies: Grand Canyon (which includes an Off-Campus Studies program at Grand Canyon National Park).

Prerequisite: Acceptance in Wilderness Studies at the Grand Canyon OCS program. History 205 is recommended but not required.

Spring Break OCS Program Course. ENTS 307 required for Spring Term registration.

HIST 316.00 Presenting America's Founding 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 59787

Serena R Zabin

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence focused on the study of the founding of the United States in American public life. The course will begin with a two-week off-campus study program during winter break in Washington, D.C and Boston, where we will visit world-class museums and historical societies, meet with museum professionals, and learn about the goals and challenges of history museums, the secrets to successful exhibitions, and the work of museum curators and directors. The course will culminate in the winter term with the completion of an exhibit created in conjunction with one of the museums located on Boston’s Freedom Trail.

Prerequisite: History 315

Participation in Winter Break History Program

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