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Your search for courses for 22/WI and with code: MARSSUPP found 12 courses.

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ARBC 387.00 The One Thousand and One Nights 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62291

Yaron Klein

This course is an exploration of the world of the Thousand and One Nights, the most renowned Arabic literary work of all time. The marvelous tales spun by Shahrazad have captured and excited the imagination of readers and listeners--both Arab and non-Arab--for centuries. In class, we will read in Arabic, selections from the Nights, and engage some of the scholarly debates surrounding this timeless work. We will discuss the question of its origin in folklore and popular culture and the mystery of its "authorship," as well as the winding tale of its reception, adaptation and translation. Readings and class discussions will be in both Arabic and English.

Prerequisite: Arabic 206 or equivalent

ARCN 111.00 Archaeology of the Americas 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61281

Sarah A Kennedy

This class will examine how archaeologists know the past, focusing on North and South America. The course is organized by themes including migration (first peopling of the Americas, trans-Atlantic slave trade), early cities (Caral in South America, Teotihuacan in Central America, Cahokia in North America), and the environment (domestication, over hunting).  Remember--the past is not something natural and static that waits to be “discovered.” The past changes depending on who gets to tell the story--it is not neutral! Whose past is legitimate? Which voices get heard or ignored? In this course, you will find out!

ARTH 101.00 Introduction to Art History I 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61531

Jessica F Keating

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from antiquity through the "Middle Ages." The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, sacred spaces, images of the gods, imperial portraiture, and domestic decoration.

ARTH 209.00 Chinese Painting 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61533

Kathleen M Ryor

Since the tenth century in China, a tension emerges between art created as a means of self expression and works which were intended to display social status and political power and to convey conventional values. This course concentrates on the primary site of this tension, the art of painting. We will explore such issues as the influence of Confucian and Daoist philosophy on painting and calligraphy, the changing perception of nature and the natural in art, the politics of style, and the increasing dominance of poetry rather than narrative as a conceptual construct for painting.

ARTH 235.00 Revival, Revelation, and Re-animation: The Art of Europe's "Renaissance" 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61534

Jessica F Keating

This course examines European artistic production in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and the Netherlands from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century. The aim of the course is to introduce diverse forms of artistic production, as well as to analyze the religious, social, and political role of art in the period. While attending to the specificities of workshop practices, production techniques, materials, content, and form of the objects under discussion, the course also interrogates the ways in which these objects are and, at times, are not representative of the "Renaissance."

Prerequisite: One Art History course or instructor permission

ARTH 263.07 European Architectural Studies Program: Prehistory to Postmodernism 6 credits

Baird E Jarman

This course surveys the history of European architecture while emphasizing firsthand encounters with actual structures. Students visit outstanding examples of major transnational styles--including Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Moorish, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical and Modernist buildings--along with regionally specific styles, such as Spanish Plateresque, English Tudor and Catalan Modernisme. Cultural and technological changes affecting architectural practices are emphasized along with architectural theory, ranging from Renaissance treatises to Modernist manifestos. Students also visit buildings that resist easy classification and that raise topics such as spatial appropriation, stylistic hybridity, and political symbolism.

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS Architectural Studies Program

Participation in Carleton OCS Architectural Studies Program

CLAS 124.00 Roman Archaeology and Art 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62263

Alex R Knodell

The material worlds of the ancient Romans loom large in our cultural imagination. No other civilization has made as direct a contribution to our own political system or to its physical vestiges of power and authority. From the architecture of the state to visual narratives of propaganda, Roman influence is ubiquitous in the monuments of western civilization. But what were the origins of the Romans? Their innovations? Their technical, artistic, and ideological achievements? How are they relevant today? This course explores these questions and more through the archaeology of the eternal city and beyond.

ENGL 114.00 Introduction to Medieval Narrative 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62767

George G Shuffelton

This class will focus on three of the most popular and closely connected modes of narrative enjoyed by medieval audiences: the epic, the romance, and the saint's life. Readings, drawn primarily from the English and French traditions, will include BeowulfThe Song of Roland, the Arthurian romances of Chretien de Troyes, and legends of St. Alexis and St. Margaret. We will consider how each narrative mode influenced the other, as we encounter warriors and lovers who suffer like saints, and saints who triumph like warriors and lovers. Readings will be in translation or highly accessible modernizations.

ENGL 203.00 Other Worlds of Medieval English Literature 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62227

George G Shuffelton

When medieval writers imagined worlds beyond their own, what did they see?  This course will examine depictions of the afterlife, the East, and magical realms of the imagination. We will read romances, saints' lives, and a masterpiece of pseudo-travel literature that influenced both Shakespeare and Columbus, alongside contemporary theories of postcolonialism, gender and race. We will visit the lands of the dead and the undead, and compare gruesome punishments and heavenly rewards. We will encounter dog-headed men, Amazons, cannibals, armies devoured by hippopotami, and roasted geese that fly onto waiting dinner tables. Be prepared. Readings in Middle English and in modern translations.

HIST 137.00 Early Medieval Worlds in Transformation 6 credits

William L North

In this course we will explore a variety of distinct but interconnected worlds that existed between ca.300 and ca.1050. We will interrogate primary sources, especially written and visual materials, as they bear witness to people forming and transforming political, social, religious, and cultural values, ideas and structures. We will work to understand how communities adapt to new conditions and challenges while maintaining links with and repurposing the lifeways, ideas, and material cultures of the past. We will watch as new and different groups and institutions come to power, and how the existing peoples and structures respond and change. Projects in this course will build capacity to interpret difficult primary documents, formulate research questions, and build arguments that combine rigor and humane sympathy.

RELG 155.00 Hinduism: An Introduction 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

Hinduism is the world's third-largest religion (or, as some prefer, “way of life”), with about 1.2 billion followers. It is also one of its oldest, with roots dating back at least 3500 years. “Hinduism,” however, is a loosely defined, even contested term, designating the wide variety of beliefs and practices of the majority of the people of South Asia. This survey course introduces students to this great variety, including social structures (such as the caste system), rituals and scriptures, mythologies and epics, philosophies, life practices, politics, poetry, sex, gender, Bollywood, and—lest we forget—some 330 million gods and goddesses.

RELG 322.00 Apocalypse How? 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62391

Sonja G Anderson

When will the world end, and how? What’s wrong with the world—morally, politically, naturally—such that people have seen its destruction as necessary or inevitable? Are visions of “The End” a form of sophisticated resistance literature, aimed at oppressive systems of power? Or are they evidence of a disturbed mind disconnected from reality? This seminar takes a deep dive into the contours of apocalyptic thought, which in its most basic form is about unmasking the deceptions of the given world by revealing the secret workings of the universe. We will begin with the earliest apocalypses, found in ancient Jewish and Christian texts, and move into modern religious and “secular” visions of cosmic collapse. Our approach will be historical and comparative, and we will explore topics ranging from doomsday cults to climate catastrophe, visions of heaven to tours of hell, malevolent angels to meddling UFOs, all the while asking how the apocalyptic imagination creates, as one thinker put it, “another world to live in.”

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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