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Your search for courses for 22/WI and with code: NEURELEC found 9 courses.

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BIOL 240.00 Genetics 6 credits

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 35, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62095

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff

A study of the transmission of genetic information between generations of organisms, and of the mechanism of expression of information within an individual organism. The main emphasis will be on the physical and chemical basis of heredity; mutational, transmissional and functional analysis of the genetic material, and gene expression.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 or instructor permission

BIOL 248.00 Behavioral Ecology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62097

Annie L Bosacker

Behavioral ecologists strive to understand the complex ways that ecological pressures influence the evolution of behavioral strategies. It can be argued that animals face a relatively small set of basic challenges: they must acquire food, water, and mates, and they must avoid danger. Yet we see a rich diversity of solutions to these problems. Consider foraging behavior, for example. All animals must acquire energy, but some filter particles out of sea water, others graze on nearly inedible grasses, while still others hunt in cooperative packs. In this course we will consider such topics as foraging, communication, sociality, and conflict. By focusing on the functions and evolutionary histories of behaviors, we strive to better understand the puzzle of behavioral diversity.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 332.00 Human Physiology 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 38, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62099

Fernan Jaramillo

Human Physiology seeks to understand the fundamental mechanisms responsible for the diverse functions of the body. Course topics include the function and regulation of the various physiological systems (nervous, circulatory, endocrine, excretory, respiratory, digestive, etc.), biochemistry, cellular physiology, homeostasis and acid-base chemistry. The study of human physiology provides the principal groundwork for internal medicine, pharmacology, and other related health fields. The laboratory includes a variety of experiments focusing on the function and regulation of the human body.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126; Concurrent registration in Biology 333

BIOL 333 required. Students should waitlist for BOTH 333 (lab) and 332 (lecture) to be considered for enrollment from either waitlist.

BIOL 333.01 Human Physiology Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 218

MTWTHF
1:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62100

Fernan Jaramillo

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Biology 332; Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 332 required. Students should waitlist for BOTH 333 (lab) and 332 (lecture) to be considered for enrollment from either waitlist.

BIOL 333.02 Human Physiology Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 218

MTWTHF
8:00am12:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62101

Fernan Jaramillo

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Biology 332; Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 332 required. Students should waitlist for BOTH 333 (lab) and 332 (lecture) to be considered for enrollment from either waitlist.

CS 254.00 Computability and Complexity 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 60500

James O Ryan

An introduction to the theory of computation. What problems can and cannot be solved efficiently by computers? What problems cannot be solved by computers, period? Topics include formal models of computation, including finite-state automata, pushdown automata, and Turing machines; formal languages, including regular expressions and context-free grammars; computability and uncomputability; and computational complexity, particularly NP-completeness.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 and Computer Science 202 (Mathematics 236 will be accepted in lieu of Computer Science 202)

PHIL 225.00 Philosophy of Mind 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62192

Jason A Decker

What is the relationship between the mind and the brain? Are they identical? Or is there mental "stuff" in addition to physical stuff? Or perhaps some physical stuff has irreducibly mental properties? These, and related questions, are explored by philosophers under the heading of "the mind-body problem." In this course, we will start with these questions, looking at classical and contemporary defenses of both materialism and dualism. This investigation will lead us to other important questions such as: What is the nature of mental representation, what is consciousness, and could a robot have conscious states and mental representations?

PSYC 371.00 Evolutionary and Developmental Trends in Cognition 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61791

Julie J Neiworth

Recent findings have brought to light some very compelling examples of humanlike cognition in nonhuman primates: tool use and tool making, family bonding, complex social behaviors such as cooperation, altruism, communication, and emotion. The study of infant cognition has also revealed more complex cognitive abilities in developing humans. Each of these topics is considered in the context of the cognitive workings of the primate mind, with emphasis on apes (gorilla, chimpanzee), monkeys (particularly cebus and rhesus varieties) and human children. The goal is to evaluate the uniqueness of primate cognition, both human and nonhuman.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Biology 126 or Psychology 216 or instructor permission

PSYC 379.00 Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61792

Lawrence J Wichlinski, Steven F Kozberg

This seminar will focus on the biological and psychological components of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. We will also address the possible causes of these disorders, and examine some current controversies surrounding diagnosis and treatment.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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