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Your search for courses for 22/WI and with code: POSI-DSS2 found 6 courses.

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ECON 268.00 Economics of Cost Benefit Analysis 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62377

Aaron M Swoboda

Cost-benefit analysis is a tool commonly used by economists and policy makers to compare and choose among competing policy options. This course will cover the basic theory and empirical techniques necessary to quantify and aggregate the impacts of government policy, especially as related to the environment. Topics covered include the time value of money; uncertainty; sensitivity analysis; option value; contingent valuation; hedonic estimation; basic research design. Throughout the course case studies will be used to elucidate and bring life to the theoretical concepts.

Prerequisite: Economics 111. Some statistics background will be useful.

HIST 242.00 Communism, Cold War, Collapse: Russia Since Stalin 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62452

Adeeb Khalid

In this course we will explore the history of Russia and other former Soviet states in the period after the death of Stalin, exploring the workings of the communist system and the challenges it faced internally and internationally. We will investigate the nature of the late Soviet state and look at the different trajectories Russia and other post-Soviet states have followed since the end of the Soviet Union.

POSC 247.00 Comparative Nationalism 6 credits

Dev Gupta

Nationalism is an ideology that political actors have frequently harnessed to support a wide variety of policies ranging from intensive economic development to genocide. But what is nationalism? Where does it come from? And what gives it such emotional and political power? This course investigates competing ideas about the sources of nationalism, its evolution, and its political uses in state building, legitimation, development, and war. We will consider both historic examples of nationalism, as well as contemporary cases drawn from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the United States.

POSC 269.00 I Did My Own Research: Information and Political Division in America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62828

Brian F Harrison

Many Americans sense that polarization makes governance harder; scholars argue that polarization can undermine democracy itself. How do we manage difficult problems in a polarized political era? Can we ever agree if we are so free to pursue information that only supports what we already believe? We examine group identity in American culture and how boundaries affect attitudes and behavior as well as information around policy disputes around incarceration/policing, free speech, LGBTQ rights, health care, elections, immigration, and more. Finally, we consider how to reduce unproductive polarization for a better America even when we don’t agree on what better entails.

POSC 308.00 Global Gender Politics* 6 credits

Summer N Forester

How have gendered divisions of power, labor, and resources contributed to the global crises of violence, sustainability, and inequity? Where and why has the pursuit of gender justice elicited intense backlash, especially within the last two decades? In this course, we will explore the global consequences of gender inequality and the ongoing pursuit of gender justice both transnationally and in different regions of the world. We will investigate a variety of cases ranging from land rights movements in East Africa, to the international movement to ban nuclear weapons. Finally, we will pay special attention to how hard-won gains in women’s rights and other related inequalities in world affairs are being jeopardized by new and old authoritarianisms.

POSC 372.00 Mansions and Shantytowns: Politics of the Spaces We Live In* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61359

Huan Gao

This course explores theories about spaces/places and investigates the impact of our physical environment on a broad range of social and political issues. We will look at how parks, monuments, residential communities, and other features of our cities and towns are made, who makes them, and in turn, their effects on our daily lives. Students will engage with important contemporary issues such as residential segregation, public space management, protest policing, etc. Most of the course will focus on urban politics, with a brief foray into rural issues. The goal of this course is to encourage students to think about everyday environmental features in a more systematic and theoretic manner and design social scientific inquiries into spatial issues.

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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