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Your search for courses for 22/WI and with code: RELGPERT found 9 courses.

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RELG 110.00 Understanding Religion 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62388

Caleb S Hendrickson

How can we best understand the role of religion in the world today, and how should we interpret the meaning of religious traditions -- their texts and practices -- in history and culture? This class takes an exciting tour through selected themes and puzzles related to the fascinating and diverse expressions of religion throughout the world. From politics and pop culture, to religious philosophies and spiritual practices, to rituals, scriptures, gender, religious authority, and more, students will explore how these issues emerge in a variety of religions, places, and historical moments in the U.S. and across the globe.

RELG 155.00 Hinduism: An Introduction 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

Hinduism is the world's third-largest religion (or, as some prefer, “way of life”), with about 1.2 billion followers. It is also one of its oldest, with roots dating back at least 3500 years. “Hinduism,” however, is a loosely defined, even contested term, designating the wide variety of beliefs and practices of the majority of the people of South Asia. This survey course introduces students to this great variety, including social structures (such as the caste system), rituals and scriptures, mythologies and epics, philosophies, life practices, politics, poetry, sex, gender, Bollywood, and—lest we forget—some 330 million gods and goddesses.

RELG 162.00 Jesus, the Bible, and Christian Beginnings 6 credits

Sonja G Anderson

Who was Jesus? What’s in the Bible? How did Christianity begin? This course is an introduction to the oldest Christian documents we have (27 books in the New Testament) as well as several ancient texts that did not become part of the Bible. We will study this literature critically and historically by situating it within its ancient Jewish, Greco-Roman context, but we will also learn about the different ways modern readers have interpreted it. As we work our way through the texts, we will pay special attention to three topics of enduring debate and political significance in the history of biblical interpretation: (1) suffering, liberation, and empire; (2) antisemitism, and (3) gender, sexuality, and marriage.

RELG 218.00 The Body in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61373

Chumie Juni

Mind and body are often considered separate but not equal; the mind gives commands to the body and the body complies. Exploring the ways the three religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam think about the body will deepen our understanding of the mind-body relationship. We will ask questions such as: How does the body direct the mind? How do religious practices discipline the body and the mind, and how do habits of body and mind change the forms and meanings of these practices? Gender, sexuality, sensuality, and bodily function will be major axes of analysis.

RELG 221.00 Judaism and Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61384

Chumie Juni

How does gender shape the Jewish tradition, and how have Jewish historical moments, texts, and practices shaped Jewish notions of gender? Taking Judaism as a test case, this course will explore the relationship between historical circumstance, positionality, and the religious imaginary. We will examine the ways that Jewish gender and theology inform each other. We will see how gender was at play in Jewish negotiations of economic and social class, racial and ethnic status, even citizenship. Following the threads of practice and narrative, we will think about how intersectional gender has shaped the stories Jews tell, and the stories that are told about them.

RELG 274.00 Religion and Bioethics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62399

Caleb S Hendrickson

This class examines the ethical principles that often guide decision-making in health care. It focuses on principles espoused by many religious and humanistic traditions, within the context of a modern, pluralistic society. Using plentiful case studies, we consider a number of issues in bioethics, including assisted suicide; maternal-fetal relations; artificial reproduction, including human cloning; the use of human subjects in research; health care justice and reform; triage and allocation of sparse medical resources; and public health issues surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic.

RELG 300.00 Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62390

Kristin C Bloomer

What, exactly, is religion and what conditions of modernity have made it urgent to articulate such a question in the first place? Why does religion exert such force in human society and history? Is it an opiate of the masses or an illusion laden with human wish-fulfillment? Is it a social glue? A subjective experience of the sacred? Is it simply a universalized Protestant Christianity in disguise, useful in understanding, and colonizing, the non-Christian world? This seminar, for junior majors and advanced majors from related fields, explores generative theories from anthropology, sociology, psychology, literary studies, and the history of religions.

RELG 322.00 Apocalypse How? 6 credits

Sonja G Anderson

When will the world end, and how? What’s wrong with the world—morally, politically, naturally—such that people have seen its destruction as necessary or inevitable? Are visions of “The End” a form of sophisticated resistance literature, aimed at oppressive systems of power? Or are they evidence of a disturbed mind disconnected from reality? This seminar takes a deep dive into the contours of apocalyptic thought, which in its most basic form is about unmasking the deceptions of the given world by revealing the secret workings of the universe. We will begin with the earliest apocalypses, found in ancient Jewish and Christian texts, and move into modern religious and “secular” visions of cosmic collapse. Our approach will be historical and comparative, and we will explore topics ranging from doomsday cults to climate catastrophe, visions of heaven to tours of hell, malevolent angels to meddling UFOs, all the while asking how the apocalyptic imagination creates, as one thinker put it, “another world to live in.”

RELG 399.00 Senior Research Seminar 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62392

Asuka Sango

This seminar will acquaint students with research tools in various fields of religious studies, provide an opportunity to present and discuss research work in progress, hone writing skills, and improve oral presentation techniques.

Prerequisite: Religion 300 and acceptance of proposal for senior integrative exercise and instructor permission.

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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