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ARBC 245.00 Modern Arab Environments 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62823

Zaki A Haidar

In this course we will study representations of the environment in modern Arab culture, across the media of film and literature. In our approach to Egyptian culture we will study depictions of the exemplary space of the cityscape and the village, and their entanglement with myths of nation. In the film and fiction of North Africa and the Persian Gulf we will explore representations of the desert, and a literary and visual approach that defies the typical casting of arid spaces as barren. We will explore how works from Palestine, Iraq, and Lebanon envision the relationship of their societies to the mountain and sea. Through our close study of Arab fictions we will think about how environments have shaped those societies, and how members of those societies have made claims of their own about and upon their surroundings. In translation, no Arabic required. All course readings will be in English. 

In translation

ARBC 387.00 The One Thousand and One Nights 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62291

Yaron Klein

This course is an exploration of the world of the Thousand and One Nights, the most renowned Arabic literary work of all time. The marvelous tales spun by Shahrazad have captured and excited the imagination of readers and listeners--both Arab and non-Arab--for centuries. In class, we will read in Arabic, selections from the Nights, and engage some of the scholarly debates surrounding this timeless work. We will discuss the question of its origin in folklore and popular culture and the mystery of its "authorship," as well as the winding tale of its reception, adaptation and translation. Readings and class discussions will be in both Arabic and English.

Prerequisite: Arabic 206 or equivalent

ARTH 101.00 Introduction to Art History I 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61531

Jessica F Keating

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from antiquity through the "Middle Ages." The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, sacred spaces, images of the gods, imperial portraiture, and domestic decoration.

ARTH 172.00 Modern Art: 1890-1945 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61532

Ross K Elfline

This course explores developments in the visual arts, architecture, and theory in Europe and America between 1890 and 1945. The major Modernist artists and movements that sought to revolutionize vision, culture, and experience, from Symbolism to Surrealism, will be considered. The impact of World War I, the Great Depression, and the rise of fascism will be examined as well for their devastation of the Modernist dream of social-cultural renewal. Lectures will be integrated with discussions of artists' theoretical writings and group manifestoes, such as those of the Futurists, Dadaists, Surrealists, Constructivists, and DeStijl, in addition to select secondary readings.

ARTH 209.00 Chinese Painting 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61533

Kathleen M Ryor

Since the tenth century in China, a tension emerges between art created as a means of self expression and works which were intended to display social status and political power and to convey conventional values. This course concentrates on the primary site of this tension, the art of painting. We will explore such issues as the influence of Confucian and Daoist philosophy on painting and calligraphy, the changing perception of nature and the natural in art, the politics of style, and the increasing dominance of poetry rather than narrative as a conceptual construct for painting.

ARTH 235.00 Revival, Revelation, and Re-animation: The Art of Europe's "Renaissance" 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61534

Jessica F Keating

This course examines European artistic production in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and the Netherlands from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century. The aim of the course is to introduce diverse forms of artistic production, as well as to analyze the religious, social, and political role of art in the period. While attending to the specificities of workshop practices, production techniques, materials, content, and form of the objects under discussion, the course also interrogates the ways in which these objects are and, at times, are not representative of the "Renaissance."

Prerequisite: One Art History course or instructor permission

ARTH 263.07 European Architectural Studies Program: Prehistory to Postmodernism 6 credits

Baird E Jarman

This course surveys the history of European architecture while emphasizing firsthand encounters with actual structures. Students visit outstanding examples of major transnational styles--including Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Moorish, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical and Modernist buildings--along with regionally specific styles, such as Spanish Plateresque, English Tudor and Catalan Modernisme. Cultural and technological changes affecting architectural practices are emphasized along with architectural theory, ranging from Renaissance treatises to Modernist manifestos. Students also visit buildings that resist easy classification and that raise topics such as spatial appropriation, stylistic hybridity, and political symbolism.

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS Architectural Studies Program

Participation in Carleton OCS Architectural Studies Program

ARTH 264.07 European Architectural Studies Program: Managing Monuments: Issues in Cultural Heritage Practice 3 credits

Closed: Size: 27, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 59772

Baird E Jarman

This course explores the theory and practice of cultural resource management by investigating how various architectural sites and urban historic districts operate. Students will consider cultural, financial, ethical and pedagogical aspects of contemporary tourism practices within a historical framework that roots the travel industry alongside religious pilgrimage customs and the aristocratic tradition of the Grand Tour. Interacting with professionals who help oversee architectural landmarks and archaeological sites, students will analyze and assess initiatives at various locations, ranging from educational programs and preservation plans to sustainability efforts and repatriation debates.

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS Architectural Studies Program

Participation in OCS Architectural Studies Program

ARTH 321.00 Arts of the Chinese Scholar's Studio 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61536

Kathleen M Ryor

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in China, unprecedented economic development and urbanization expanded the number of educated elite who used their wealth to both display their status and distinguish themselves as cultural leaders. As a result, this period experienced a boom in estate and garden building, art collecting and luxury consumption. This course will examine a wide range of objects from painting and calligraphy to furniture and ceramics within the context of domestic architecture of the late Ming dynasty. It will also examine the role of taste and social class in determining the style of art and architecture.

CAMS 211.00 Film History II 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61977

Dimitrios Pavlounis

This course charts the continued rise and development of cinema 1948-1968, focusing on monuments of world cinema and their industrial, cultural, aesthetic and political contexts. Topics include postwar Hollywood, melodrama, authorship, film style, labor strikes, runaway production, censorship, communist paranoia and the blacklist, film noir, Italian neorealism, widescreen aesthetics, the French New Wave, art cinema, Fellini, Bergman, the Polish School, the Czech New Wave, Japanese and Indian cinema, political filmmaking in the Third World, and the New Hollywood Cinema. Requirements include class attendance and participation, readings, evening film screenings, and various written assignments and exams.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CAMS 246.00 Documentary Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61978

Cecilia M Cornejo

This course explores the relevance and influence of documentary films by closely examining the aesthetic concerns and ethical implications inherent in these productions. We study these works both as artistic undertakings and as documents produced within a specific time, culture, and ideology. Central to our understanding of the form are issues of technology, methodology, and ethics, which are examined thematically as well as chronologically. The course offers an overview of the major historical movements in documentary film along more recent works; it combines screenings, readings, and discussions with the goal of preparing students to both understand and analyze documentary films.

Extra Time Required, weekly evening screenings T 7-9

CCST 208.00 International Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61945

David G Tompkins

Have you just returned from Asia, Africa, Europe, or South America? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with the culture (and, when appropriate, the language) you left behind. Relying on magazines and newspapers around the world, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. You may choose to read the press in the local language, or read English-language media about your region, meeting once each week for conversational exchange. (Language of conversation is English.)

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CCST 275.00 I'm A Stranger Here Myself 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61946

Éva S Pósfay

What do enculturation, tourism, culture shock, "going native," haptics, cross-cultural adjustment, and third culture kids have in common? How do intercultural transitions shape identity? What is intercultural competence? This course explores theories about intercultural contact and tests their usefulness by applying them to the analysis of world literature, case studies, and the visual arts, and by employing students' intercultural experiences as evidence. From individualized, self-reflective exercises to community-oriented group endeavors, our activities will promote new intercultural paradigms in the classroom and the wider community. Course designed for off-campus returnees, students who have lived abroad, or who have experienced being outsiders.

CCST 398.00 The Cross-Cultural Panorama: A Capstone Workshop 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61947

David G Tompkins

The work of Cross-Cultural Studies traverses many disciplines, often engaging with experiences that are difficult to capture in traditional formats. In this course students will create an ePortfolio that reflects, deepens, and narrates the various forms of cross-cultural experience they have had at Carleton, drawing on coursework and off-campus study, as well as such extra-curricular activities as talks, service learning, internships and fellowships. Guided by readings and prompts, students will write a reflective essay articulating the coherence of the parts, describing both the process and the results of their pathway through the minor. Considered a capstone for CCST, but for anyone looking to thread together their experiences across culture. Course is taught as a workshop. 

CHIN 251.00 Heroes, Heroines, Exceptional Lives in Chinese Biographical Histories 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62306

Lei Yang

Through generic and historical analysis of the two-millennia long biographical tradition in Chinese historical writing, this project explores lives of heroes and heroines, including, but not limited to: dynastic founders, ministers, generals, poets, assassins, and exceptional women. In this introduction to premodern Chinese culture and literature, students will experience, in English translation, some of the most beautiful works of ancient Chinese literature from the second century BCE through the eighteenth century CE. No prior Chinese language study required.

In translation

CHIN 358.00 Advanced Chinese: Everyday Life in Ancient China 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Olin 106

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 60551

Lin Deng

Were chopsticks originally eating utensils? Did ancient Chinese sleep on beds and sit on chairs? What did they wear? In this course, students will find answers to questions like those in a series of expository writings concerning various aspects of daily life in ancient Chinese society, while enhancing their proficiency in comprehending authentic materials and producing extended discourse on related topics through a variety of oral and written coursework. This course also provides a fair amount of exposure to common sources for historical studies of China, and thus expands students’ vocabulary and knowledge about Chinese history and archaeology.

Prerequisite: Chinese 206 or equivalent

CLAS 124.00 Roman Archaeology and Art 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62263

Alex R Knodell

The material worlds of the ancient Romans loom large in our cultural imagination. No other civilization has made as direct a contribution to our own political system or to its physical vestiges of power and authority. From the architecture of the state to visual narratives of propaganda, Roman influence is ubiquitous in the monuments of western civilization. But what were the origins of the Romans? Their innovations? Their technical, artistic, and ideological achievements? How are they relevant today? This course explores these questions and more through the archaeology of the eternal city and beyond.

ECON 240.00 Microeconomics of Development 6 credits

Faress F Bhuiyan

This course explores household behavior in developing countries. We will cover areas including fertility decisions, health and mortality, investment in education, the intra-household allocation of resources, household structure, and the marriage market. We will also look at the characteristics of land, labor, and credit markets, particularly technology adoption; land tenure and tenancy arrangements; the role of agrarian institutions in the development process; and the impacts of alternative politics and strategies in developing countries. The course complements Economics 241.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 242.00 Economy of Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 60401

Victor Almeida

This course offers an introduction to the economy of Latin America. We will study the region's policies undertaken during its colonial period and its development strategy during the twentieth century. Topics include import substitution industrialization, the 1980s debt crisis, hyperinflation, dollarization, and international trade agreements. Besides these experiences shared by many countries in Latin America, we will also analyze selected country-specific ones such as the Brazilian stabilization plans and the recent Argentine sovereign debt crisis.

Prerequisite: Economics 110

ENGL 225.00 'Public Offenders': Pre-Raphaelites and Bloomsbury Group 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62231

Susan Jaret McKinstry

Two exceptional groups of artists changed aesthetic and cultural history through their writings, art, politics, and lives. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood began in 1847 when art students united to create “direct and serious and heartfelt” work; the Bloomsbury group began with Cambridge friends sharing their insistence on aesthetic lives. Critics said the PRB “extolled fleshliness as the supreme end of poetic and pictorial art,” and the Bloomsbury Group “painted in circles, lived in squares and loved in triangles.” We will study Dante Rossetti, Holman Hunt, John Millais, William Morris, Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forster, Roger Fry, Vanessa and Clive Bell.

ENGL 251.00 Contemporary Indian Fiction 6 credits

Arnab Chakladar

Contemporary Indian writers, based either in India or abroad, have become significant figures in the global literary landscape. This can be traced to the publication of Salman Rushdie's second novel, Midnight's Children in 1981. We will begin with that novel and read some of the other notable works of fiction of the following decades. The class will provide both a thorough grounding in the contemporary Indian literary scene as well as an introduction to some concepts in post-colonial studies.

EUST 110.00 The Nation State in Europe 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62019

Paul Petzschmann

This course explores the role of the nation and nationalism within modern Europe and the ways in which ideas and myths about the nation have complemented and competed with conceptions of Europe as a geographic, cultural and political unity. We will explore the intellectual roots of nationalism in different countries as well as their artistic, literary and musical expressions. In addition to examining nationalism from a variety of disciplinary perspectives--sociology, anthropology, history, political science--we will explore some of the watershed, moments of European nationalism such as the French Revolution, the two world wars, and the Maastricht treaty.

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 335

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:15pm
Synonym: 60450

Chérif Keïta

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 60451)

FREN 235.00 The Human Body in the Francophone World 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62585

Cathy Yandell

What can a body do? How does it mean? Cultural attitudes elicit distinct responses to this question, and French-speaking cultures in France, North Africa, and West Africa produce particular responses, as do gendered and differently abled bodies. At the same time, isn’t every body like every other body, but different? Through literature, cultural readings, podcasts, and film, this course will examine various aspects of the human body in francophone culture, including gender, athletics, manual labor, artistic expression, sexuality, dance, and “personal development.” Taught in French.

Prerequisite: French 204 or the equivalent

FREN 370.00 Cultural Mutations in the Francophone World: Theory and Practice 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 202

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62639

Sandra E Rousseau

Racisé, transclasse, personne valide, female gaze are all concepts that have emerged recently in the Francophone world even though they reflect experiences that have existed for a very long time. In this class we will work through such concepts and explore how central they are to the contemporary Francophone world. Through theoretical texts and cultural artefacts (films, songs, BD, literature) from Morocco, France, Belgium, Senegal, and other spaces, this class seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the issues that animate the French-speaking world today.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

GERM 216.00 German Short Prose 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62278

Juliane Schicker

The course introduces students to the joys and challenges of reading short German fictional and non-fictional texts of various genres from three centuries, including fairy tales, aphorisms, short stories, novellas, tweets, essays, and newspaper articles. We will read slowly and with an eye to grammar and vocabulary building, while also concentrating on developing an understanding of German cultural history. Texts and class discussions will be in German.

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent

GERM 251.00 Identity, Belonging, and Spaces of Home in the Works of Fatma Aydemir 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61370

Juliane Schicker

In this course, offered in conjunction with the Christopher Light Lectureship, we will familiarize ourselves with the work of contemporary German author Fatma Aydemir, focussing particularly on her publications that deal with questions of migration and Heimat. We will read and discuss several fictional and nonfictional texts, participate in a creative nonfiction workshop and other events with Aydemir herself, and exhibit final projects at a public event.

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent or instructor consent

HIST 137.00 Early Medieval Worlds in Transformation 6 credits

William L North

In this course we will explore a variety of distinct but interconnected worlds that existed between ca.300 and ca.1050. We will interrogate primary sources, especially written and visual materials, as they bear witness to people forming and transforming political, social, religious, and cultural values, ideas and structures. We will work to understand how communities adapt to new conditions and challenges while maintaining links with and repurposing the lifeways, ideas, and material cultures of the past. We will watch as new and different groups and institutions come to power, and how the existing peoples and structures respond and change. Projects in this course will build capacity to interpret difficult primary documents, formulate research questions, and build arguments that combine rigor and humane sympathy.

HIST 156.00 History of Modern Korea 6 credits

Seungjoo Yoon

A comparative historical survey on the development of Korean society and culture from the nineteenth century to the present. Key themes include colonialism and war, economic growth, political transformation, socio-cultural changes, and historical memory. Issues involving divided Korea will be examined in the contexts of post-colonialism and Cold War. Students are also expected to develop skills to analyze key historical moments from relevant primary sources against broader historiographical contexts.

HIST 165.00 From Young Turks to Arab Revolutions: A Cultural History of the Modern Middle East 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62450

Adeeb Khalid

This course provides a basic introduction to the history of the wider Muslim world from the eighteenth century to the present. We will discuss the cultural and religious diversity of the Muslim world and its varied interactions with modernity. We will find that the history of the Muslim world is inextricably linked to that of its neighbors, and we will encounter colonialism, anti-colonialism, nationalism, and socialism, as well as a variety of different Islamic movements.

HIST 177.00 Borderlands in Latin American History 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61296

Jennifer L Schaefer

Fluid borders, imagined frontiers, and contested territories have shaped Latin American history from the colonial period through the present. The course asks, how did people cross borders and form new identities? How did they engage with the landscape around them? Focusing on regions including Patagonia, the Gran Chaco, the Brazilian Sertão, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, this course explores the complexity of regional, national, and transnational identities. Course themes include the relationship between mapping and power, peoples’ relationship with the environment, the enslavement of African and Indigenous peoples in frontier regions, conflicts over contested regions, and processes of nation-building.

HIST 184.00 Colonial West Africa 6 credits

Thabiti C Willis

This course surveys the history of West Africa during the colonial period, 1860-1960. It offers an introduction to the roles that Islam and Christianity played in establishing and maintaining colonial rule. It looks at the role of colonialism in shaping African ethnic identities and introducing new gender roles. In addition, we will examine the transition from slave labor to wage labor, and its role in exacerbating gender, generation, and class divisions among West Africans. The course also highlights some of the ritual traditions and cultural movements that flourished in response to colonial rule.

HIST 242.00 Communism, Cold War, Collapse: Russia Since Stalin 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62452

Adeeb Khalid

In this course we will explore the history of Russia and other former Soviet states in the period after the death of Stalin, exploring the workings of the communist system and the challenges it faced internally and internationally. We will investigate the nature of the late Soviet state and look at the different trajectories Russia and other post-Soviet states have followed since the end of the Soviet Union.

HIST 244.00 The Enlightenment and Its Legacies 6 credits

Susannah R Ottaway

The Enlightenment: praised for its role in promoting human rights, condemned for its role in underwriting colonialism; lauded for its cosmopolitanism, despised for its Eurocentrism... how should we understand the cultural and intellectual history of the Enlightenment, and what are its legacies? This course starts by examining essential Enlightenment texts by philosophes such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau, and then the second half of the term focuses on unpacking the Enlightenment's entanglements with modern ideas around topics such as religion, race, sex, gender, colonialism etc.

HIST 270.00 Nuclear Nations: India and Pakistan as Rival Siblings 6 credits

Amna Khalid

At the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947 India and Pakistan, two new nation states emerged from the shadow of British colonialism. This course focuses on the political trajectories of these two rival siblings and looks at the ways in which both states use the other to forge antagonistic and belligerent nations. While this is a survey course it is not a comprehensive overview of the history of the two countries. Instead it covers some of the more significant moments of rupture and violence in the political history of the two states. The first two-thirds of the course offers a top-down, macro overview of these events and processes whereas the last third examines the ways in which people experienced these developments. We use the lens of gender to see how the physical body, especially the body of the woman, is central to the process of nation building. We will consider how women’s bodies become sites of contestation and how they are disciplined and policed by the postcolonial state(s).

HIST 273.00 Disease and Health in Latin American History 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61297

Jennifer L Schaefer

Yellow fever, malaria, chagas, dengue, tuberculosis, and cholera preoccupied physicians, scientists, politicians, and urban planners in Latin America from the colonial period through the present. This course explores how ideas about health and disease were connected to race, ethnicity, and status during the colonial period and linked with nation-building during the nineteenth century. It examines how health and disease intertwined with imperialist projects and intersected with modernization campaigns during the twentieth century. It also considers the relationship between medical institutions, physicians, midwives, and healers. Other course topics include how perceptions about health, including mental and reproductive health, shaped people’s experiences.

LCST 245.00 The Critical Toolbox: Who's Afraid of Theory? 6 credits

Seth E Peabody

This class introduces students to the various theoretical frameworks and the many approaches scholars can use when analyzing a text (whether this text is a film, an image, a literary piece or a performance). What do words like ‘structuralism,’ ‘ecocriticism,’ 'cultural studies,' and ‘postcolonial studies’ refer to? Most importantly, how do they help us understand the world around us? This class will be organized around interdisciplinary theoretical readings and exercises in cultural analysis.

Prerequisite: At least one 200- or 300-level course in Literary/Artistic Analysis (in any language) or instructor permission

MUSC 192.00 West African Drum Ensemble 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center M027

MTWTHF
5:30pm6:30pm
Synonym: 60935

Jay L Johnson

The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa.

Prerequisite: Music 199 and/or instructor permission

MUSC 241.00 Music of Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61413

Sarah N Lahasky

This course is designed to increase your awareness of musical styles in Latin America within particular social, economic, and political contexts. We will cover topics related to popular, folkloric, classical, and indigenous musics spanning from Mexico to South America's Southern Cone. The course will include elements of performance and dance instruction in addition to a critical examination of lived experiences across the region. No previous musical experience is necessary.

PE 338.07 Sports and Globalization in London and Seville: Global Athletics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 60199

Bob S Carlson

With their rich history and current success, English and Spanish sport will serve as a framework to examine the emergence of contemporary athletics and current issues facing participants, coaches, administrators, and spectators. The course will explore the world of sport and specifically football (soccer) from a generalist perspective. London and Seville will provide rich and unique opportunities to learn how sport and society intersect. With classroom activities, site visits, field trips to matches, museums, and stadiums students will examine sport from an historical and cultural perspective while keeping in mind how our globalized world impacts sport. Lastly, we will seek to understand ways athletics can break down barriers and create understanding between others.

Participation in Carleton OCS London & Seville Program

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62496

Juan Diego Prieto

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 62497)

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62500

Tun Myint

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 235.00 The Endless War on Terror 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62511

Summer N Forester

In the aftermath of 9/11, the U.S. launched the Global War on Terror to purportedly find, stop,and defeat every terrorist group with a global reach. Without question, the Global War on Terror has radically shaped everything from U.S. foreign policies and domestic institutions to civil liberties and pop culture. In this course, we will examine the events of 9/11 and then critically assess the immediate and long-term ramifications of the endless Global War on Terror on different states and communities around the world. While we will certainly spend time interrogating U.S. policies from the Bush, Obama, and Trump administrations, we will also examine reactions to those policies across both the global north and the global south.

POSC 238.07 Sport & Globalization London/Seville Pgm: Globalization and Development: Lessons from Int'l Football 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60200

Bob S Carlson

This course uses international football (soccer) as a lens to analyze topics in globalization, such as immigration and labor, inequality, foreign investment, trade in services, and intellectual property. Students will be presented with key debates in these areas and then use cases from international football as illustrations. Focusing on the two wealthiest leagues in Europe, the English Premier League and the Spanish Liga, students will address key issues in the study of globalization and development, and in doing so enhance their understanding of the world, sports, and sport's place in the world.

Participation in Carleton OCS London & Seville Program

POSC 247.00 Comparative Nationalism 6 credits

Dev Gupta

Nationalism is an ideology that political actors have frequently harnessed to support a wide variety of policies ranging from intensive economic development to genocide. But what is nationalism? Where does it come from? And what gives it such emotional and political power? This course investigates competing ideas about the sources of nationalism, its evolution, and its political uses in state building, legitimation, development, and war. We will consider both historic examples of nationalism, as well as contemporary cases drawn from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the United States.

POSC 249.00 From the International to the Global: Critical Theories of World Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61358

Paul Petzschmann

Why is the world divided territorially? Why are some states considered more powerful than others? What can be done about violent conflict? This course will introduce students with critical approaches to world politics that ask these and other big questions. Marxist, feminist, post-structuralist and post-colonial scholars have challenged classical approaches of thinking about the international in terms of states and power. They have also questioned the dominance of western conceptions of politics in the way political scientists view the world. In this course will read and debate their contributions and apply them to real cases. 

POSC 308.00 Global Gender Politics* 6 credits

Summer N Forester

How have gendered divisions of power, labor, and resources contributed to the global crises of violence, sustainability, and inequity? Where and why has the pursuit of gender justice elicited intense backlash, especially within the last two decades? In this course, we will explore the global consequences of gender inequality and the ongoing pursuit of gender justice both transnationally and in different regions of the world. We will investigate a variety of cases ranging from land rights movements in East Africa, to the international movement to ban nuclear weapons. Finally, we will pay special attention to how hard-won gains in women’s rights and other related inequalities in world affairs are being jeopardized by new and old authoritarianisms.

POSC 372.00 Mansions and Shantytowns: Politics of the Spaces We Live In* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61359

Huan Gao

This course explores theories about spaces/places and investigates the impact of our physical environment on a broad range of social and political issues. We will look at how parks, monuments, residential communities, and other features of our cities and towns are made, who makes them, and in turn, their effects on our daily lives. Students will engage with important contemporary issues such as residential segregation, public space management, protest policing, etc. Most of the course will focus on urban politics, with a brief foray into rural issues. The goal of this course is to encourage students to think about everyday environmental features in a more systematic and theoretic manner and design social scientific inquiries into spatial issues.

RELG 155.00 Hinduism: An Introduction 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

Hinduism is the world's third-largest religion (or, as some prefer, “way of life”), with about 1.2 billion followers. It is also one of its oldest, with roots dating back at least 3500 years. “Hinduism,” however, is a loosely defined, even contested term, designating the wide variety of beliefs and practices of the majority of the people of South Asia. This survey course introduces students to this great variety, including social structures (such as the caste system), rituals and scriptures, mythologies and epics, philosophies, life practices, politics, poetry, sex, gender, Bollywood, and—lest we forget—some 330 million gods and goddesses.

RELG 162.00 Jesus, the Bible, and Christian Beginnings 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62398

Sonja G Anderson

Who was Jesus? What’s in the Bible? How did Christianity begin? This course is an introduction to the oldest Christian documents we have (27 books in the New Testament) as well as several ancient texts that did not become part of the Bible. We will study this literature critically and historically by situating it within its ancient Jewish, Greco-Roman context, but we will also learn about the different ways modern readers have interpreted it. As we work our way through the texts, we will pay special attention to three topics of enduring debate and political significance in the history of biblical interpretation: (1) suffering, liberation, and empire; (2) antisemitism, and (3) gender, sexuality, and marriage.

RELG 218.00 The Body in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61373

Chumie Juni

Mind and body are often considered separate but not equal; the mind gives commands to the body and the body complies. Exploring the ways the three religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam think about the body will deepen our understanding of the mind-body relationship. We will ask questions such as: How does the body direct the mind? How do religious practices discipline the body and the mind, and how do habits of body and mind change the forms and meanings of these practices? Gender, sexuality, sensuality, and bodily function will be major axes of analysis.

RUSS 205.00 Russian in Cultural Contexts 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 242

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 60477

Anna M Dotlibova

In this course students continue to develop skills of narration, listening comprehension, and writing, while exploring issues of contemporary Russian life and consciousness. The issues are examined from the position of two cultures: American and Russian. The course draws on a variety of sources for reading and viewing, including the periodic press, film, and music.

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62344

Colin McLaughlin-Alcock

Anthropology is the study of all human beings in all their diversity, an exploration of what it means to be human throughout the globe. This course helps us to see ourselves, and others, from a new perspective. By examining specific analytic concepts—such as culture—and research methods—such as participant observation—we learn how anthropologists seek to understand, document, and explain the stunning variety of human cultures and ways of organizing society. This course encourages you to consider how looking behind cultural assumptions helps anthropologists solve real world dilemmas.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 62345)

SOAN 233.00 Anthropology of Food 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62349

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Food is the way to a person's heart but perhaps even more interesting, the window into a society's soul. Simply speaking understating a society's foodways is the best way to comprehend the complexity between people, culture and nature. This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior, from food procurement and consumption practices to the politics of nutrition and diets. In doing so we hope to elucidate how food is more than mere sustenance and that often the act of eating is a manifestation of power, resistance, identity, and community. Class fees apply.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 233.WL0 (Synonym 62350)

SOAN 262.00 Anthropology of Health and Illness 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62336

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide. This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune. Specific topics include the symbolism of models of illness, the ritual management of misfortune and of life crisis events, the political economy of health, therapy management, medical pluralism, and cross-cultural medical ethics.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 331.00 Anthropological Thought and Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62337

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

A systematic introduction to the theoretical foundations of social and cultural anthropology with special emphasis given to twentieth century British, French and American schools. The course deals with such seminal figures as Morgan, Boas, Malinowski, Radcliffe-Brown, Levi-Straus, Harris, Sahlins, Bourdieu, Geertz, and Appadurai. The reading strikes a balance between ethnographic accounts and theoretical statements.

Prerequisite: Socilogy/Anthropology 110 or 111, and at least one 200- or 300-level SOAN course, or permission of instructor.

SOAN 353.00 Ethnography of Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 62352

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

This course explores the origins and development of contemporary lived experiences in Latin America as interpreted through ethnographic works in anthropology. We will examine and analyze the structural processes that have shaped contact among indigenous, European, and non-European immigrants (e.g. African and Asian peoples) in Latin America since the Conquest and through colonial periods to understand today's Latin American societies. We will pay special attention to the impacts of global capitalist expansion and state formation, sites of resilience and resistance, as well as the movement of Latin American peoples throughout the world today. Course themes will address gender, identity, social organization, indigeneity, immigration, social inequality and environment.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

Not open to students who have taken SOAN 250

SPAN 205.01 Conversation and Composition 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 60427

Humberto R Huergo

A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 208.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 10, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 205

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62433

Jorge Brioso

An excellent opportunity to brush up your Spanish while learning about current issues in Spain and Latin America. The class meets only once a week for an hour. Class requirements include reading specific sections of Spain's leading newspaper, El País, everyday on the internet (El País), and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students like yourself.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 242.00 Introduction to Latin American Literature 6 credits

Silvia López

An introductory course to reading major texts in Spanish provides an historical survey of the literary movements within Latin American literature from the pre-Hispanic to the contemporary period. Recommended as a foundation course for further study. Not open to seniors.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency

Not open to seniors

SPAN 318.00 Islamic Spain 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62587

Humberto R Huergo

Muslims conquered Spain in 711 and lived in the country roughly until 1614. This course will examine the Islamic origins of Spain from a variety of disciplines, including literature, religion, history, and art history. Topics covered include:Hispano-Arabic literature, the fall of Granada, the repression of Moriscos under Philip II, aljamiado literature (literature written in Spanish with Arabic characters), the expulsion of Moriscos, and the diaspora in Tunisia. We will also devote two weeks to the study of the representation of Turks, Muslims, and Moriscos in Cervantes’ plays and novels, including several chapters of his famous Don Quixote. All texts are in Spanish, including Arab sources by Ibn Hazm, Wallada, Muhya, and other Hispano-Arabic and Morisco writers.  

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

SPAN 319.00 Works on Work: Films and Literature on Labor in Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 60238

Hector A Melo Ruiz

This course studies the cultural representation of labor in Latin America. It focuses on the racial division of labor over the colonial, industrial, and neoliberal periods. We will analyze a wide range of visual and literary representations of Native, Black and women workers under the Encomienda labor system; peonages during the period of independence and specific national contexts (i.e. rubber tapper); industrial workers throughout the twentieth century (blue-collar workers); as well as the role of unemployment and precarized labor within the context of globalization.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

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