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ARCN 111.00 Archaeology of the Americas 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61281

Sarah A Kennedy

This class will examine how archaeologists know the past, focusing on North and South America. The course is organized by themes including migration (first peopling of the Americas, trans-Atlantic slave trade), early cities (Caral in South America, Teotihuacan in Central America, Cahokia in North America), and the environment (domestication, over hunting).  Remember--the past is not something natural and static that waits to be “discovered.” The past changes depending on who gets to tell the story--it is not neutral! Whose past is legitimate? Which voices get heard or ignored? In this course, you will find out!

CCST 275.00 I'm A Stranger Here Myself 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61946

Éva S Pósfay

What do enculturation, tourism, culture shock, "going native," haptics, cross-cultural adjustment, and third culture kids have in common? How do intercultural transitions shape identity? What is intercultural competence? This course explores theories about intercultural contact and tests their usefulness by applying them to the analysis of world literature, case studies, and the visual arts, and by employing students' intercultural experiences as evidence. From individualized, self-reflective exercises to community-oriented group endeavors, our activities will promote new intercultural paradigms in the classroom and the wider community. Course designed for off-campus returnees, students who have lived abroad, or who have experienced being outsiders.

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61333

Yingtong Xie

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61334

Victor Almeida

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.03 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61335

Nathan D Grawe

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61336

Michael T Hemesath

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61337

Prathi Seneviratne

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61338

Jonathan M Lafky

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 240.00 Microeconomics of Development 6 credits

Faress F Bhuiyan

This course explores household behavior in developing countries. We will cover areas including fertility decisions, health and mortality, investment in education, the intra-household allocation of resources, household structure, and the marriage market. We will also look at the characteristics of land, labor, and credit markets, particularly technology adoption; land tenure and tenancy arrangements; the role of agrarian institutions in the development process; and the impacts of alternative politics and strategies in developing countries. The course complements Economics 241.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 242.00 Economy of Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 60401

Victor Almeida

This course offers an introduction to the economy of Latin America. We will study the region's policies undertaken during its colonial period and its development strategy during the twentieth century. Topics include import substitution industrialization, the 1980s debt crisis, hyperinflation, dollarization, and international trade agreements. Besides these experiences shared by many countries in Latin America, we will also analyze selected country-specific ones such as the Brazilian stabilization plans and the recent Argentine sovereign debt crisis.

Prerequisite: Economics 110

ECON 265.00 Game Theory and Economic Applications 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61340

Jonathan M Lafky

Game theory is the study of purposeful behavior in strategic situations. It serves as a framework for analysis that can be applied to everyday decisions, such as working with a study group and cleaning your room, as well as to a variety of economic issues, including contract negotiations and firms' output decisions. In this class, modern game theoretic tools will be primarily applied to economic situations, but we will also draw on examples from other realms.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 268.00 Economics of Cost Benefit Analysis 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62377

Aaron M Swoboda

Cost-benefit analysis is a tool commonly used by economists and policy makers to compare and choose among competing policy options. This course will cover the basic theory and empirical techniques necessary to quantify and aggregate the impacts of government policy, especially as related to the environment. Topics covered include the time value of money; uncertainty; sensitivity analysis; option value; contingent valuation; hedonic estimation; basic research design. Throughout the course case studies will be used to elucidate and bring life to the theoretical concepts.

Prerequisite: Economics 111. Some statistics background will be useful.

ECON 271.00 Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment 6 credits

Mark T Kanazawa

This course focuses on environmental economics, energy economics, and the relationship between them. Economic incentives for pollution abatement, the industrial organization of energy production, optimal depletion rates of energy sources, and the environmental and economic consequences of alternate energy sources are analyzed.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 280.00 International Trade 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

CMC 210

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61342

Prathi Seneviratne

A study of international trade theories and their policy implications. Classical and neo-classical trade models, the gains from trade, the terms of trade and the distribution of income, world trade patterns, international factor movements, tariffs, and the impact of commercial policy on developing and developed countries are analyzed.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 282.00 The Theory of Investment Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61343

Yingtong Xie

This course provides an introduction to the main financial instruments that are used to fund economic activity. We will explore how investment products function and learn how to price a few of them. Attention will be given to the choices investors make, and should make, when allocating portfolios. Topics include bond pricing, stock pricing, option pricing, the mortgage market, hedge funds, private equity, optimal portfolios, defaults, financial intermediary capital, and investors' behavioral biases.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 330.00 Intermediate Price Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

CMC 306

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61344

Jenny Bourne

An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111

Extra Time Required

ECON 331.00 Intermediate Macro Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61345

Ethan L Struby

Analysis of the forces determining the general level of output, employment, and prices with special emphasis on the role of money and on interest rate determination. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275) or permission of the instructor and Economics 110 and 111

ECON 395.00 Advanced Topics in Macroeconomics and Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62616

Ethan L Struby

The seminar will explore contemporary approaches to the analysis of the macroeconomy and financial markets. Topics include tests of canonical, micro-founded models of household, investor, and firm behavior; the analysis of business cycles and the dynamic response of the macroeconomy to exogenous shocks; proximate and fundamental theories of long-run growth across countries; and the design and effects of stabilization policies. Students will also be exposed to empirical methods suited for the causal analysis of cross-sectional, time series, and panel data.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330 and 331 or instructor consent

EDUC 110.00 Introduction to Educational Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62409

Anita P Chikkatur

This course will focus on education as a multidisciplinary field of study. We will explore the meanings of education within individual lives and institutional contexts, learn to critically examine the assumptions that writers, psychologists, sociologists and philosophers bring to the study of education, and read texts from a variety of disciplines. What has "education" meant in the past? What does "education" mean in contemporary American society? What might "education" mean to people with differing circumstances and perspectives? And what should "education" mean in the future? Open only to first-and second-year students.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: EDUC 110.WL0 (Synonym 62410)

EDUC 262.00 Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy: Teaching and Learning in Diverse Classrooms 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62411

Deborah Appleman

This course focuses on the importance of integrating students' cultural backgrounds in all aspects of learning. We will study various theoretical perspectives on culturally relevant, responsive, and sustaining pedagogy and will explore several school sites that incorporate that perspective into their approach to teaching and learning. Students will design and teach culturally sustaining curriculum from their own disciplinary background in K-16 setting.

Prerequisite: Educational Studies 100 or 110

ENTS 310.00 Topics in Environmental Law and Policy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62176

Kimberly K Smith

This seminar will examine topical issues in domestic and international environmental law and policy. We will aim to understand how environmental laws work to achieve policy objectives, with attention also to debates about the role of markets and community-based environmental management. The specific topics may change from year to year, but may include approaches to sustainable development, sustainable agriculture, protection of endangered species, and conservation and management of water resources. This course has no prerequisites and is suitable for students of environmental studies, political science, international relations and political economy.

GWSS 110.00 Introduction to Gender, Women's & Sexuality Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61812

Jayne A Swift

This course is an introduction to the ways in which gender and sexuality structure our world, and to the ways feminists challenge established intellectual frameworks. However, since gender and sexuality are not homogeneous categories, but are crosscut by class, race, ethnicity, citizenship and culture, we also consider the ways differences in social location intersect with gender and sexuality.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GWSS 110.WL0 (Synonym 61813)

LING 135.00 Introduction to Sociolinguistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62819

Morgan Rood

There is a complex relationship between language and society. This course examines how language variation is tied to identity and the role of language in human social interaction. We will consider language as it relates to social status, age, gender, ethnicity, and location as well as theoretical models used to study variation. We will also examine how language is used in conversation, in the media, and beyond using ethnography of communication and discourse analysis. You will become more aware of how language is used in your own daily life and will be able to argue sociolinguistic perspectives on language attitudes.

LING 375.00 Second Language Acquisition: Speech 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

CMC 319

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62163

Jenna T Conklin

Why do some people acquiring a second language obtain a pronunciation indistinguishable from that of native speakers, while others, despite excellent skills in the areas of syntax, semantics, and vocabulary, never shed their “foreign accent”? In this seminar, we will explore theoretical models that examine the impact of factors like age of acquisition, length of residence, motivation, learning environment, language identity, and native language on the phonetics and phonology of second language acquisition, looking at speech production and perception. The course will be organized around a term-long collaborative research project, with goals and topic set by the class.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 217

PE 350.00 Methods: Principles and Philosophy of Coaching 3 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 60647

Aaron D Rushing

This course emphasizes the methods of teaching skills, structure, and strategies of team oriented sports. Emphasis is placed on understanding the coaching profession at different levels, developing coaching skills and creating a philosophy of coaching.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62496

Juan Diego Prieto

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 62497)

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62500

Tun Myint

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 212.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Kimberly K Smith

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62501

Greg G Marfleet

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275), AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) or Psychology 200/201 or Sociology/Anthropology 239

POSC 238.07 Sport & Globalization London/Seville Pgm: Globalization and Development: Lessons from Int'l Football 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60200

Bob S Carlson

This course uses international football (soccer) as a lens to analyze topics in globalization, such as immigration and labor, inequality, foreign investment, trade in services, and intellectual property. Students will be presented with key debates in these areas and then use cases from international football as illustrations. Focusing on the two wealthiest leagues in Europe, the English Premier League and the Spanish Liga, students will address key issues in the study of globalization and development, and in doing so enhance their understanding of the world, sports, and sport's place in the world.

Participation in Carleton OCS London & Seville Program

POSC 247.00 Comparative Nationalism 6 credits

Dev Gupta

Nationalism is an ideology that political actors have frequently harnessed to support a wide variety of policies ranging from intensive economic development to genocide. But what is nationalism? Where does it come from? And what gives it such emotional and political power? This course investigates competing ideas about the sources of nationalism, its evolution, and its political uses in state building, legitimation, development, and war. We will consider both historic examples of nationalism, as well as contemporary cases drawn from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the United States.

POSC 249.00 From the International to the Global: Critical Theories of World Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61358

Paul Petzschmann

Why is the world divided territorially? Why are some states considered more powerful than others? What can be done about violent conflict? This course will introduce students with critical approaches to world politics that ask these and other big questions. Marxist, feminist, post-structuralist and post-colonial scholars have challenged classical approaches of thinking about the international in terms of states and power. They have also questioned the dominance of western conceptions of politics in the way political scientists view the world. In this course will read and debate their contributions and apply them to real cases. 

POSC 269.00 I Did My Own Research: Information and Political Division in America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62828

Brian F Harrison

Many Americans sense that polarization makes governance harder; scholars argue that polarization can undermine democracy itself. How do we manage difficult problems in a polarized political era? Can we ever agree if we are so free to pursue information that only supports what we already believe? We examine group identity in American culture and how boundaries affect attitudes and behavior as well as information around policy disputes around incarceration/policing, free speech, LGBTQ rights, health care, elections, immigration, and more. Finally, we consider how to reduce unproductive polarization for a better America even when we don’t agree on what better entails.

POSC 306.00 Identity Politics and Group Behavior in America* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62566

Brian F Harrison

In recent years we have heard a lot about “identity politics.” This course aims to answer the question, why do people form group-based identities and how do they impact mass political attitudes and behavior? Using examples from American politics, we will examine the psychological underpinnings of identity and group-based affiliations as well as their political consequences. In doing so, we will explore how bias, prejudice, and social hierarchy are formed, maintained, and changed. Such evaluations will be based on discussions of various dominant and minority group identities including partisanship, race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, religion, and place. Students will learn how and where the United States has progressed in promoting group equality and fairness and where it has not or has even moved backwards. Students end the course with a deeper understanding of the core American paradox of the persistence of group hierarchy in a country dedicated to democracy, equality, and liberty and what people can do to resolve that paradox.

POSC 308.00 Global Gender Politics* 6 credits

Summer N Forester

How have gendered divisions of power, labor, and resources contributed to the global crises of violence, sustainability, and inequity? Where and why has the pursuit of gender justice elicited intense backlash, especially within the last two decades? In this course, we will explore the global consequences of gender inequality and the ongoing pursuit of gender justice both transnationally and in different regions of the world. We will investigate a variety of cases ranging from land rights movements in East Africa, to the international movement to ban nuclear weapons. Finally, we will pay special attention to how hard-won gains in women’s rights and other related inequalities in world affairs are being jeopardized by new and old authoritarianisms.

POSC 372.00 Mansions and Shantytowns: Politics of the Spaces We Live In* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61359

Huan Gao

This course explores theories about spaces/places and investigates the impact of our physical environment on a broad range of social and political issues. We will look at how parks, monuments, residential communities, and other features of our cities and towns are made, who makes them, and in turn, their effects on our daily lives. Students will engage with important contemporary issues such as residential segregation, public space management, protest policing, etc. Most of the course will focus on urban politics, with a brief foray into rural issues. The goal of this course is to encourage students to think about everyday environmental features in a more systematic and theoretic manner and design social scientific inquiries into spatial issues.

PSYC 110.01 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61786

Gisel G Flores-Montoya

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 110.02 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 42, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61781

Julia F Strand

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 244.00 Positive Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61787

Neil S Lutsky

This course evaluates the effort to use the tools of psychological science to understand the sources and nature of positive human strengths, characteristics, resources, and aspirations, and to apply any knowledge gained to help individuals and institutions function more effectively.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 371.00 Evolutionary and Developmental Trends in Cognition 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61791

Julie J Neiworth

Recent findings have brought to light some very compelling examples of humanlike cognition in nonhuman primates: tool use and tool making, family bonding, complex social behaviors such as cooperation, altruism, communication, and emotion. The study of infant cognition has also revealed more complex cognitive abilities in developing humans. Each of these topics is considered in the context of the cognitive workings of the primate mind, with emphasis on apes (gorilla, chimpanzee), monkeys (particularly cebus and rhesus varieties) and human children. The goal is to evaluate the uniqueness of primate cognition, both human and nonhuman.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Biology 126 or Psychology 216 or instructor permission

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62344

Colin McLaughlin-Alcock

Anthropology is the study of all human beings in all their diversity, an exploration of what it means to be human throughout the globe. This course helps us to see ourselves, and others, from a new perspective. By examining specific analytic concepts—such as culture—and research methods—such as participant observation—we learn how anthropologists seek to understand, document, and explain the stunning variety of human cultures and ways of organizing society. This course encourages you to consider how looking behind cultural assumptions helps anthropologists solve real world dilemmas.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 62345)

SOAN 111.00 Introduction to Sociology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62334

Wes D Markofski

Sociology is an intellectual discipline, spanning the gap between the sciences and humanities while often (though not always) involving itself in public policy debates, social reform, and political activism. Sociologists study a startling variety of topics using qualitative and quantitative methods. Still, amidst all this diversity, sociology is centered on a set of core historical theorists (Marx/Weber/Durkheim) and research topics (race/class/gender inequality). We will explore these theoretical and empirical foundations by reading and discussing influential texts and select topics in the study of social inequality while relating them to our own experiences and understanding of the social world. 

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 111.WL0 (Synonym 62335)

SOAN 233.00 Anthropology of Food 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62349

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Food is the way to a person's heart but perhaps even more interesting, the window into a society's soul. Simply speaking understating a society's foodways is the best way to comprehend the complexity between people, culture and nature. This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior, from food procurement and consumption practices to the politics of nutrition and diets. In doing so we hope to elucidate how food is more than mere sustenance and that often the act of eating is a manifestation of power, resistance, identity, and community. Class fees apply.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 233.WL0 (Synonym 62350)

SOAN 262.00 Anthropology of Health and Illness 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62336

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide. This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune. Specific topics include the symbolism of models of illness, the ritual management of misfortune and of life crisis events, the political economy of health, therapy management, medical pluralism, and cross-cultural medical ethics.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 278.00 Urban Ethnography and the American Experience 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62351

Wes D Markofski

American sociology has a rich tradition of focusing the ethnographic eye on the American experience. We will take advantage of this tradition to encounter urban America through the ethnographic lens, expanding our social vision and investigating the nature of race, place, meaning, interaction, and inequality in the U.S. While doing so, we will also explore the unique benefits, challenges, and underlying assumptions of ethnographic research as a distinctive mode of acquiring and communicating social knowledge. As such, this course offers both an immersion in the American experience and an inquiry into the craft of ethnographic writing and research.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 310.00 Sociology of Mass Incarceration 6 credits

Annette M Nierobisz

Since the 1980s, the United States criminal justice system has embarked on a social experiment we now call, “mass incarceration.” The outcome – unprecedented rates of imprisonment, particularly in BIPOC communities – has had devastating consequences for individuals, families, neighborhoods, and American society. This course explores the causes and consequences of mass incarceration. Potential topics include: race, class, gender, and age in the prison system; the impacts of incarceration on children and intimate partners who get left behind; punishment strategies such as solitary confinement and the death penalty; the lucrative business of the prison industrial complex; and the promise of prison abolition.

Prerequisite: Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above.

SOAN 331.00 Anthropological Thought and Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62337

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

A systematic introduction to the theoretical foundations of social and cultural anthropology with special emphasis given to twentieth century British, French and American schools. The course deals with such seminal figures as Morgan, Boas, Malinowski, Radcliffe-Brown, Levi-Straus, Harris, Sahlins, Bourdieu, Geertz, and Appadurai. The reading strikes a balance between ethnographic accounts and theoretical statements.

Prerequisite: Socilogy/Anthropology 110 or 111, and at least one 200- or 300-level SOAN course, or permission of instructor.

SOAN 353.00 Ethnography of Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 62352

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

This course explores the origins and development of contemporary lived experiences in Latin America as interpreted through ethnographic works in anthropology. We will examine and analyze the structural processes that have shaped contact among indigenous, European, and non-European immigrants (e.g. African and Asian peoples) in Latin America since the Conquest and through colonial periods to understand today's Latin American societies. We will pay special attention to the impacts of global capitalist expansion and state formation, sites of resilience and resistance, as well as the movement of Latin American peoples throughout the world today. Course themes will address gender, identity, social organization, indigeneity, immigration, social inequality and environment.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

Not open to students who have taken SOAN 250

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