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Your search for courses for 22/WI and in LAIR 205 found 7 courses.

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ENGL 114.00 Introduction to Medieval Narrative 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62767

George G Shuffelton

This class will focus on three of the most popular and closely connected modes of narrative enjoyed by medieval audiences: the epic, the romance, and the saint's life. Readings, drawn primarily from the English and French traditions, will include BeowulfThe Song of Roland, the Arthurian romances of Chretien de Troyes, and legends of St. Alexis and St. Margaret. We will consider how each narrative mode influenced the other, as we encounter warriors and lovers who suffer like saints, and saints who triumph like warriors and lovers. Readings will be in translation or highly accessible modernizations.

ENGL 220.01 Arts of Oral Presentation 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 14, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62228

Michael J Kowalewski

Instruction and practice in being a speaker and an audience in formal and informal settings.

1st 5 weeks

ENGL 220.02 Arts of Oral Presentation 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 14, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62229

Michael J Kowalewski

Instruction and practice in being a speaker and an audience in formal and informal settings.

2nd 5 weeks

ENGL 223.00 American Transcendentalism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62230

Peter J Balaam

Attempts to discern the nineteenth-century Zeitgeist come down, Emerson says, to a "practical question of the conduct of life. How shall I live?" This interdisciplinary course will investigate the works of the American Transcendentalist movement in its restless discontent with the conventional, its eclectic search for better ways of thinking and living. We will engage major works of Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, and Whitman alongside documents of the scientific, religious, and political changes that shaped their era and provoked their responses.

ENGL 253.00 Food Writing: History, Culture, Practice 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 60234

Arnab Chakladar

We are living in perhaps the height of what might be called the "foodie era" in the U.S. The cooking and presentation of food dominates Instagram and is one of the key draws of YouTube and various television and streaming networks; shows about chefs and food culture are likewise very popular. Yet a now less glamorous form with a much longer history persists: food writing. In this course we will track some important genres of food writing over the last 100 years or so. We will examine how not just food but cultural discourses about food and the world it circulates in are consumed and produced. We will read recipes and reviews; blogs and extracts from cookbooks, memoirs and biographies; texts on food history and policy; academic and popular feature writing. Simultaneously we will also produce food writing of our own in a number of genres. 

ENGL 265.00 News Stories 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62235

Susan Jaret McKinstry

This journalism course explores the process of moving from event to news story. Students will study and write different forms of journalism (including news, reviews, features, interviews, investigative pieces, and images), critique one another’s writing, and revise their pieces for a final portfolio of professional work.

ENGL 323.00 Romanticism and Reform 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62219

Constance Walker

Mass protests, police brutality, reactionary politicians, imprisoned journalists, widespread unemployment, and disease were all features of the Romantic era in Britain as well as our own time. We will explore how its writers brilliantly advocate for empathy, liberty, and social justice in the midst of violence and upheaval. Readings will include works by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Percy and Mary Shelley, and their contemporaries.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one other 6 credit English course

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