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BIOL 248.00 Behavioral Ecology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62097

Annie L Bosacker

Behavioral ecologists strive to understand the complex ways that ecological pressures influence the evolution of behavioral strategies. It can be argued that animals face a relatively small set of basic challenges: they must acquire food, water, and mates, and they must avoid danger. Yet we see a rich diversity of solutions to these problems. Consider foraging behavior, for example. All animals must acquire energy, but some filter particles out of sea water, others graze on nearly inedible grasses, while still others hunt in cooperative packs. In this course we will consider such topics as foraging, communication, sociality, and conflict. By focusing on the functions and evolutionary histories of behaviors, we strive to better understand the puzzle of behavioral diversity.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

GWSS 265.00 Black Feminist Thought 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 61382

Zenzele Isoke

This course is designed to introduce students to thirty years of black feminist politics, writing, social and cultural analysis, and research. This course begins with a sketch of contemporary thinking about blackness by noted scholars who illuminate the relationship between blackness, black life, systems of sex/gender, biopolitics, and black/queer feminist knowledge production. We go on to historicize the formation of black feminism as a dynamic and fluid area of study within and across the humanities and social sciences. The history of black feminist thought presented in black women’s studies as an inherently decolonial and transformative praxis that centers intellectual radicalism both inside and outside of the academy.

HIST 137.00 Early Medieval Worlds in Transformation 6 credits

William L North

In this course we will explore a variety of distinct but interconnected worlds that existed between ca.300 and ca.1050. We will interrogate primary sources, especially written and visual materials, as they bear witness to people forming and transforming political, social, religious, and cultural values, ideas and structures. We will work to understand how communities adapt to new conditions and challenges while maintaining links with and repurposing the lifeways, ideas, and material cultures of the past. We will watch as new and different groups and institutions come to power, and how the existing peoples and structures respond and change. Projects in this course will build capacity to interpret difficult primary documents, formulate research questions, and build arguments that combine rigor and humane sympathy.

PHIL 105.00 The Complications of Heroism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 60715

Eddie E O'Byrn

What does it mean to be heroic? Are heroes in the Western world consistent across contexts and vantage points? In this introduction to philosophy, we explore some lauded philosophical discussions on heroism, ethical complications, and shifts in the valuation of heroic and ethical acts. Students will read contemporary and historical philosophical texts by figures such as Thomas Carlyle, Søren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche, and others. Students will explore illustrations of heroism by the primary authors and we will explore counter examples that challenge these views. Finally, students are invited to explore the meaning of heroism today utilizing the course's philosophical resources.

PHIL 232.00 Social and Political Philosophy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 62193

Anna Moltchanova

We will study several prominent late twentieth century philosophers writing about social and political justice and representing a variety of views, such as liberalism, socialism, libertarianism, communitarianism, feminism and post-modernism. The following are some of the authors we will read: John Rawls, Gerald Cohen, Robert Nozick, Charles Taylor, Iris Marion Young, Seyla Benhabib, Jurgen Habermas, Jean-Francois Lyotard.

POSC 212.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Kimberly K Smith

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

RELG 221.00 Judaism and Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61384

Chumie Juni

How does gender shape the Jewish tradition, and how have Jewish historical moments, texts, and practices shaped Jewish notions of gender? Taking Judaism as a test case, this course will explore the relationship between historical circumstance, positionality, and the religious imaginary. We will examine the ways that Jewish gender and theology inform each other. We will see how gender was at play in Jewish negotiations of economic and social class, racial and ethnic status, even citizenship. Following the threads of practice and narrative, we will think about how intersectional gender has shaped the stories Jews tell, and the stories that are told about them.

SOAN 233.00 Anthropology of Food 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62349

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Food is the way to a person's heart but perhaps even more interesting, the window into a society's soul. Simply speaking understating a society's foodways is the best way to comprehend the complexity between people, culture and nature. This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior, from food procurement and consumption practices to the politics of nutrition and diets. In doing so we hope to elucidate how food is more than mere sustenance and that often the act of eating is a manifestation of power, resistance, identity, and community. Class fees apply.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 233.WL0 (Synonym 62350)

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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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