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Your search for courses for 22/WI and in LEIG 305 found 6 courses.

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CS 111.02 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 60491

David Liben-Nowell

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL2 (Synonym 60493)

CS 111.03 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 60492

David Liben-Nowell

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL3 (Synonym 60494)

HIST 165.00 From Young Turks to Arab Revolutions: A Cultural History of the Modern Middle East 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62450

Adeeb Khalid

This course provides a basic introduction to the history of the wider Muslim world from the eighteenth century to the present. We will discuss the cultural and religious diversity of the Muslim world and its varied interactions with modernity. We will find that the history of the Muslim world is inextricably linked to that of its neighbors, and we will encounter colonialism, anti-colonialism, nationalism, and socialism, as well as a variety of different Islamic movements.

HIST 177.00 Borderlands in Latin American History 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61296

Jennifer L Schaefer

Fluid borders, imagined frontiers, and contested territories have shaped Latin American history from the colonial period through the present. The course asks, how did people cross borders and form new identities? How did they engage with the landscape around them? Focusing on regions including Patagonia, the Gran Chaco, the Brazilian Sertão, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, this course explores the complexity of regional, national, and transnational identities. Course themes include the relationship between mapping and power, peoples’ relationship with the environment, the enslavement of African and Indigenous peoples in frontier regions, conflicts over contested regions, and processes of nation-building.

MATH 206.00 A Tour of Mathematics 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 45, Registered: 36, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
3:30pm4:30pm
Synonym: 61606

Mark Krusemeyer

A series of eight lectures intended for students considering a Mathematics major. The emphasis will be on presenting various striking ideas, concepts and results in modern mathematics, rather than on developing extensive knowledge or techniques in any particular subject area.

POSC 247.00 Comparative Nationalism 6 credits

Dev Gupta

Nationalism is an ideology that political actors have frequently harnessed to support a wide variety of policies ranging from intensive economic development to genocide. But what is nationalism? Where does it come from? And what gives it such emotional and political power? This course investigates competing ideas about the sources of nationalism, its evolution, and its political uses in state building, legitimation, development, and war. We will consider both historic examples of nationalism, as well as contemporary cases drawn from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the United States.

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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