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Your search for courses for 22/WI and in LEIG 426 found 8 courses.

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AMST 130.00 Latinx Social Movements: From Bandits to the Young Lords 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 61513

Christine E Castro

In this class, we will discuss Latinx social and political movements across America, from post-1848 to the twentieth century. We will work to understand both their historical and historiographical impact: What conditions were these movements responding to? What emerged from their actions? And how are these movements talked about and remembered now? We will also track state responses to these movements, including the creation of law enforcement agencies in the Southwest and national counterintelligence programs.

AMST 345.00 Theory and Practice of American Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61929

Meredith L McCoy

Introduction to some of the animating debates within American Studies from the 1930s to the present. We will study select themes, theories, and methodologies in the writings of a number of scholars and try to understand 1) the often highly contested nature of debates about how best to study American culture; and 2) how various theories and forms of analysis in American Studies have evolved and transformed themselves over the last seventy years. Not designed to be a fine-grained institutional history of American Studies, but a vigorous exploration of some of the central questions of interpretation in the field. Normally taken by majors in their junior year.

Prerequisite: American Studies 115, 287 or instructor permission

ENGL 109.00 The Craft of Academic Writing 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62222

Peter J Balaam

This course is designed to demystify the practice of academic writing and to introduce students to the skills they’ll need to write effectively in a variety of academic disciplines and contexts. Students will learn how to respond to other authors’ claims, frame clear arguments of their own, structure essays to develop a clear logical flow, integrate outside sources into their writing, and improve their writing through revision. All sections will include a variety of readings, multiple writing assignments, and substantial feedback from the course instructor.

Does not fulfill curricular exploration

GWSS 212.00 Foundations of LGBTQ Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61814

Jayne A Swift

This course introduces students to foundational interdisciplinary works in sexuality and gender studies, while focusing on the construction of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer identities in the United States. In exploring sexual and gender diversity throughout the term, this seminar highlights the complexity and variability of experiences of desire, identification, embodiment, self-definition, and community-building across different historical periods, and in relation to intersections of race, class, ethnicity, and other identities.

HIST 273.00 Disease and Health in Latin American History 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61297

Jennifer L Schaefer

Yellow fever, malaria, chagas, dengue, tuberculosis, and cholera preoccupied physicians, scientists, politicians, and urban planners in Latin America from the colonial period through the present. This course explores how ideas about health and disease were connected to race, ethnicity, and status during the colonial period and linked with nation-building during the nineteenth century. It examines how health and disease intertwined with imperialist projects and intersected with modernization campaigns during the twentieth century. It also considers the relationship between medical institutions, physicians, midwives, and healers. Other course topics include how perceptions about health, including mental and reproductive health, shaped people’s experiences.

LING 216.00 Generative Approaches to Syntax 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62162

Catherine R Fortin

This course has two primary goals: to provide participants with a forum to continue to develop their analytical skills (i.e. to 'do syntax'), and to acquaint them with generative syntactic theory, especially the Principles and Parameters approach. Participants will sharpen their technological acumen, through weekly problem solving, and engage in independent thinking and analysis, by means of formally proposing novel syntactic analyses for linguistic phenomena. By the conclusion of the course, participants will be prepared to read and critically evaluate primary literature couched within this theoretical framework.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 115

SOAN 111.00 Introduction to Sociology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62334

Wes D Markofski

Sociology is an intellectual discipline, spanning the gap between the sciences and humanities while often (though not always) involving itself in public policy debates, social reform, and political activism. Sociologists study a startling variety of topics using qualitative and quantitative methods. Still, amidst all this diversity, sociology is centered on a set of core historical theorists (Marx/Weber/Durkheim) and research topics (race/class/gender inequality). We will explore these theoretical and empirical foundations by reading and discussing influential texts and select topics in the study of social inequality while relating them to our own experiences and understanding of the social world. 

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 111.WL0 (Synonym 62335)

SOAN 353.00 Ethnography of Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 62352

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

This course explores the origins and development of contemporary lived experiences in Latin America as interpreted through ethnographic works in anthropology. We will examine and analyze the structural processes that have shaped contact among indigenous, European, and non-European immigrants (e.g. African and Asian peoples) in Latin America since the Conquest and through colonial periods to understand today's Latin American societies. We will pay special attention to the impacts of global capitalist expansion and state formation, sites of resilience and resistance, as well as the movement of Latin American peoples throughout the world today. Course themes will address gender, identity, social organization, indigeneity, immigration, social inequality and environment.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

Not open to students who have taken SOAN 250

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