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Your search for courses for 22/WI and in WCC 230 found 6 courses.

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ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

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Synonym: 61338

Jonathan M Lafky

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

MUSC 103.00 Musicianship I 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm3:10pm4:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61516

Matthew J Olson

An introduction to the basic elements of rhythm and melody, with a strong emphasis on sight reading using solfège, score reading in multiple clefs, and short dictation exercises.

MUSC 131.00 The Blues From the Delta to Chicago 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61517

Justin M London

A history of the Delta blues and its influence on later blues and popular music styles, tracing its movement from the Mississippi Delta in the 1920s to Chess Records and the Chicago Blues of the 1940s and 50s (especially Howlin' Wolf and Muddy Waters). Music and musicians discussed will include the classic blues singers of the 1920s, early country music (Jimmie Rodgers), and the legacy of Robert Johnson. Issues of authenticity and "ownership" of both the music and its cultural legacy will also be discussed. The course involves readings, listening assignments, and some transcriptions of early recorded blues. No prerequisite, although the ability to read music is helpful.

MUSC 204.00 Theory II: Musical Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61349

Justin M London

An investigation into the nature of musical sounds and the way they are combined to form rhythms, melodies, harmonies, and form. Topics include the nature of musical pitch, the structure of musical scales and their influence on melody, chords and their interval content, the complexity of rhythmic patterns, and chromatic harmony and modulation. Student work includes building a musical instrument, programming a drum machine, writing computer code to create harmonies and timbres, and an extended music analysis project.

Prerequisite: Music 101, or permission of the instructor as assessed by a diagnostic exam administered at the start of the term

MUSC 215.00 Western Music and its Social Ecosystems, 1830-Present 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62815

Brooke H McCorkle

This class expands students’ understanding of Western music by concentrating on the social ecosystem of performers, musicians, and consumer-listeners of both past and present. Students will explore broad themes in music history, such as concepts of sound, materiality, religion, politics, embodiment, and narrative. Through a variety of assignments including listening analyses, creative responses, and a final project, students will develop critical thinking, research, and communication skills to help them be successful in their various musical endeavors.

Prerequisite: Ability to read Western Music Notation recommended

POSC 269.00 I Did My Own Research: Information and Political Division in America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62828

Brian F Harrison

Many Americans sense that polarization makes governance harder; scholars argue that polarization can undermine democracy itself. How do we manage difficult problems in a polarized political era? Can we ever agree if we are so free to pursue information that only supports what we already believe? We examine group identity in American culture and how boundaries affect attitudes and behavior as well as information around policy disputes around incarceration/policing, free speech, LGBTQ rights, health care, elections, immigration, and more. Finally, we consider how to reduce unproductive polarization for a better America even when we don’t agree on what better entails.

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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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