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Your search for courses for 22/WI and with Special Interest: SPECINTAPPACAD found 15 courses.

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AMST 244.00 Approaches to Indigenous Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61928

Meredith L McCoy

Indigenous Studies is both a body of content knowledge and a research methodology. This course provides an overview of the history of exploitative research dynamics between universities and Indigenous peoples while exposing students to alternative methodologies that center Indigenous perspectives and research priorities. Students will discuss what it means to be an ethical research partner as they learn about decolonizing and Indigenous research strategies. This course brings together ideas from history, anthropology, law, public health, education, literature, art, and social work to evaluate studies relating to Indigenous peoples for their methods, contributions, and ethics.

BIOL 310.00 Immunology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62098

Debby R Walser-Kuntz

This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity. Topics to be covered include the structure and function of antibodies, cytokines, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in antigen presentation, cellular immunity, immunodeficiencies, and current techniques used to study immune responses.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and either Biology 240 or 280

No lab

CS 399.03 Senior Seminar 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Olin 302

MTWTHF
1:31pm2:31pm1:31pm2:31pm
Synonym: 60504

Anya E Vostinar

As part of their senior capstone experience, majors will work together in teams (typically four to seven students per team) on faculty-specified topics to design and implement the first stage of a project. Required of all senior majors.

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Students are strongly encouraged to complete Computer Science 252 and Computer Science 257 before starting Computer Science 399.

EDUC 262.00 Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy: Teaching and Learning in Diverse Classrooms 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62411

Deborah Appleman

This course focuses on the importance of integrating students' cultural backgrounds in all aspects of learning. We will study various theoretical perspectives on culturally relevant, responsive, and sustaining pedagogy and will explore several school sites that incorporate that perspective into their approach to teaching and learning. Students will design and teach culturally sustaining curriculum from their own disciplinary background in K-16 setting.

Prerequisite: Educational Studies 100 or 110

ENGL 265.00 News Stories 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62235

Susan Jaret McKinstry

This journalism course explores the process of moving from event to news story. Students will study and write different forms of journalism (including news, reviews, features, interviews, investigative pieces, and images), critique one another’s writing, and revise their pieces for a final portfolio of professional work.

HIST 126.00 African American History II 6 credits

Noël Voltz

The transition from slavery to freedom; the post-Reconstruction erosion of civil rights and the ascendancy of Booker T. Washington; protest organizations and mass migration before and during World War I; the postwar resurgence of black nationalism; African Americans in the Great Depression and World War II; roots of the modern Civil Rights movement, and black female activism. 

HIST 137.00 Early Medieval Worlds in Transformation 6 credits

William L North

In this course we will explore a variety of distinct but interconnected worlds that existed between ca.300 and ca.1050. We will interrogate primary sources, especially written and visual materials, as they bear witness to people forming and transforming political, social, religious, and cultural values, ideas and structures. We will work to understand how communities adapt to new conditions and challenges while maintaining links with and repurposing the lifeways, ideas, and material cultures of the past. We will watch as new and different groups and institutions come to power, and how the existing peoples and structures respond and change. Projects in this course will build capacity to interpret difficult primary documents, formulate research questions, and build arguments that combine rigor and humane sympathy.

HIST 200.00 Historians for Hire 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62451

Susannah R Ottaway

A two-credit course in which students work with faculty oversight to complete a variety of public history projects with community partners. Students will work on a research project requiring them to identify and analyze primary sources, draw conclusions from the primary source research, and share their research with the appropriate audience in an appropriate form. We meet once a week at Carleton to ensure students maintain professional standards and strong relationships in their work. Potential projects include educational programming, historical society archival work, and a variety of local history opportunities. 

Extra Time Required

HIST 316.00 Presenting America's Founding 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 59787

Serena R Zabin

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence focused on the study of the founding of the United States in American public life. The course will begin with a two-week off-campus study program during winter break in Washington, D.C and Boston, where we will visit world-class museums and historical societies, meet with museum professionals, and learn about the goals and challenges of history museums, the secrets to successful exhibitions, and the work of museum curators and directors. The course will culminate in the winter term with the completion of an exhibit created in conjunction with one of the museums located on Boston’s Freedom Trail.

Prerequisite: History 315

Participation in Winter Break History Program

IDSC 298.00 FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 31, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 61403

Fernan Jaramillo

This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community. The topics of this project-based colloquium will vary each term.

Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Studies 198 as first year student

Requires registration in IDSC 298 21/FA

MATH 349.00 Methods of Teaching Mathematics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61633

Deanna B Haunsperger

Methods of teaching mathematics in grades 7-12. Issues in contemporary mathematics education. Regular visits to school classrooms and teaching a class are required.

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and instructor permission

PE 340.07 Sports and Globalization in London and Seville: Introductory Coaching Practicum 4 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60201

Bob S Carlson

Designed for students who may or may not have any previous playing or coaching experience, this course will cover introductory methods of coaching and teaching young athletes. Specifically, students will practice methods of teaching skills, structure, and strategies of team-oriented sports. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the coaching profession at different levels, developing coaching skills and creating a philosophy of coaching in a cross-cultural setting.

Participation in Carleton OCS London & Seville Program

SOAN 262.00 Anthropology of Health and Illness 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62336

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide. This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune. Specific topics include the symbolism of models of illness, the ritual management of misfortune and of life crisis events, the political economy of health, therapy management, medical pluralism, and cross-cultural medical ethics.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

STAT 285.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

CMC 201

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61450

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 280) Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) and instructor permission

Formerly Mathematics 280

THEA 345.00 Devised Theater and Collective Creation 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 172

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61827

Lizbett J Benge

A usual evening in the theater consists of seeing a text--the play--staged by a director and performed by actors. While this is certainly a collaborative endeavor, recent decades have seen a marked increase in "devised theater," a mode intended to upset the traditional hierarchies of theatrical production. In practical terms, this means the abandonment of the extant text in favor of a performance "score"--sometimes textual, often physical--developed improvisationally in rehearsal by the performers. This course will explore the methods and approaches used to work in this collective and highly creative manner, and will culminate in a public performance. We will also discuss the history and cultural politics that inform devised practice.

Prerequisite: Theater 110 or Dance 150 or 190 or instructor permission

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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