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Your search for courses for 23/SP and with code: AMSTDAC found 11 courses.

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AMST 222.00 Indigenous Film 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 65833

This course introduces students to the world of Indigenous films, beginning with representations of Indians and how these images shape what most people “know” about “Indians.” Simultaneously, Indigenous filmmakers exercise visual sovereignty by not only refusing representations of Indigenous people, but by creating visual representations of Indigenous peoples that speak to the urgent issues of the present. Through Indigenous films, we will examine genres, develop an appreciation for historical and cultural contexts of films, and consider how these films are forms of Indigenous resurgence. We will also learn the basics of media literacy and film analysis. Our key concepts include visual sovereignty, Indigenous, Indians, settler colonialism, decolonization, resurgence, tradition, and gender.

ENTS 210.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Colleen M Carpenter

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

HIST 213.00 Politics and Protest in the New Nation 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 65040

Serena R Zabin

In the first years of the United States, men and women of all races had to learn what it meant to live in the nation created by the U.S. Constitution. This class will focus on the American attempts to form a more perfect union, paying close attention to the place of slavery, Native dispossession, sexuality, and politics during the years 1787-1840. Throughout the course we will examine the ways in which the politics and protests of the early Republic continue to shape the current United States.

HIST 216.00 History Beyond the Walls 6 credits

Antony E Adler

This course will examine the world of history outside the walls of academia. Looking at secondary-school education, museums, and public policy, we will explore the ways in which both general and specialized publics learn and think about history. A central component of the course will be a civic engagement project.

Prerequisite: One History course

Extra Time Required.

HIST 229.00 Working with Gender in U.S. History 6 credits

Annette R Igra

Historically work has been a central location for the constitution of gender identities for both men and women; at the same time, cultural notions of gender have shaped the labor market. We will investigate the roles of race, class, and ethnicity in shaping multiple sexual divisions of labor and the ways in which terms such as skill, bread-winning and work itself were gendered. Topics will include domestic labor, slavery, industrialization, labor market segmentation, protective legislation, and the labor movement.

HIST 230.00 Black Americans and the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65042

Rebecca J Brueckmann

What does a most turbulent period in U.S. history look like from the perspectives of Black women and men? What role did Black thought and resistance play in shaping the outcome of the war? What was interracial democracy during Reconstruction and why was it ultimately overthrown? These are a few of the myriad questions we will seek to answer by studying the central role of Black Americans in the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. We will examine how Black people participated in and shaped the politics of this period and we will critically engage the meanings of freedom, emancipation, and democracy.

HIST 275.00 Latin American Immigration to the US 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 65711

Pedro F Quijada

Immigration from Latin America has historically been, and continues to be, a topic of concern and controversy in the United States. This course seeks to provide a clear and informed understanding of the phenomenon. It surveys various migration waves from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, and South America. Through a variety of audio-visual sources, scholarship, testimonies/memoirs, and other materials, students will examine the political and economic factors that pushed people out of their countries and pulled them into the United States; the migrants' perilous journey to the north; and the everyday life of these migrants once they are in the U.S.

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Adam J Le

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 210.00 Misinformation, Political Rumors, and Conspiracy Theories 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 65123

Christina E Farhart

Why do people believe in conspiracy theories, hold on to misinformed beliefs even in the face of mounting evidence to the contrary, and/or spread political and social rumors that may have little basis in fact? Who is most vulnerable to these various forms of misinformation? What are the normative and political consequences of misperceptions (if any)? This course explores the psychological, political, and philosophical approaches to the study of the causes, consequences, and tenacity of conspiracy beliefs, misinformation, and political rumors, as well as possible approaches that journalists could employ to combat misperceptions.

POSC 272.00 Constitutional Law II 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

HASE 105

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 65139

Steven G Poskanzer

This course will explore the United States Constitution and the legal doctrines that have emerged from it, using them as lenses through which to understand the history—and shape the future—of this country. Using prominent Supreme Court opinions as teaching tools and loci of debate (including cases on the Court’s recent and current docket), this course will explore the different kind of theoretical approaches with which to make Constitutional arguments and interpret the Constitution. It is one of two paired courses (the other being POSC 271) that complement each other. Both courses will address the structure and functioning of the United States government, and will explore in greater depth the historic Constitutional “trends” towards greater equality and more liberty (albeit slowly, haltingly, and with steps both forward and backward). This course will focus in particular on how gender equality is very much unfinished Constitutional work on our way towards a “more perfect union.” This topic will include an examination of the Court’s recent controversial decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization  In exploring matters of personal liberty, this course will focus in particular on First Amendment freedom of speech and other fundamental rights protected under the 14th Amendment’s Due Process Clause. Finally, in examining governmental structures, this course will emphasize the separation of powers across the branches of the federal government. The course will require close reading of judicial opinions and other texts, and learning how to construct arguments using logic and precedent. POSC 271 is not a prerequisite for POSC 272. The two courses can be taken independently, although having taking POSC 271 will provide students with a broader and more nuanced foundation for exploring the themes covered of this course

POSC 302.00 Subordinated Politics and Intergroup Relations* 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

How do social and political groups interact? How do we understand these interactions in relation to power? This course will introduce the basic approaches and debates in the study of prejudice, racial attitudes, and intergroup relations. We will focus on three main questions. First, how do we understand and study prejudice and racism as they relate to U.S. politics? Second, how do group identities, stereotyping, and other factors help us understand the legitimation of discrimination, group hierarchy, and social domination? Third, what are the political and social challenges associated with reducing prejudice?

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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