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Your search for courses for 23/SP and with code: AMSTSAP found 6 courses.

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EDUC 338.00 Multicultural Education 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 64674

Anita P Chikkatur

This course focuses on the respect for human diversity, especially as these relate to various racial, cultural and economic groups, and to women. It includes lectures and discussions intended to aid students in relating to a wide variety of persons, cultures, and life styles.

Prerequisite: 100 or 200-level Educational Studies course or instructor permission

Extra Time Required

ENGL 253.00 Food Writing: History, Culture, Practice 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64736

Arnab Chakladar

We are living in perhaps the height of what might be called the "foodie era" in the U.S. The cooking and presentation of food dominates Instagram and is one of the key draws of YouTube and various television and streaming networks; shows about chefs and food culture are likewise very popular. Yet a now less glamorous form with a much longer history persists: food writing. In this course we will track some important genres of food writing over the last 100 years or so. We will examine how not just food but cultural discourses about food and the world it circulates in are consumed and produced. We will read recipes and reviews; blogs and extracts from cookbooks, memoirs and biographies; texts on food history and policy; academic and popular feature writing. Simultaneously we will also produce food writing of our own in a number of genres. 

ENGL 329.00 The City in American Literature 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 007

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 64737

Nancy J Cho

How do American authors "write the city"? The city as both material reality and metaphor has fueled the imagination of diverse novelists, poets, and playwrights, through tales of fallen women and con men, immigrant dreams, and visions of apocalypse. After studying the realistic tradition of urban fiction at the turn of the twentieth century, we will turn to modern and contemporary re-imaginings of the city, with a focus on Chicago, New York and Los Angeles. Selected films, photographs, and historical sources will supplement our investigations of how writers face the challenge of representing urban worlds.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one other 6 credit English course, or instructor permission

ENTS 210.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Colleen M Carpenter

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

HIST 229.00 Working with Gender in U.S. History 6 credits

Annette R Igra

Historically work has been a central location for the constitution of gender identities for both men and women; at the same time, cultural notions of gender have shaped the labor market. We will investigate the roles of race, class, and ethnicity in shaping multiple sexual divisions of labor and the ways in which terms such as skill, bread-winning and work itself were gendered. Topics will include domestic labor, slavery, industrialization, labor market segmentation, protective legislation, and the labor movement.

POSC 302.00 Subordinated Politics and Intergroup Relations* 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

How do social and political groups interact? How do we understand these interactions in relation to power? This course will introduce the basic approaches and debates in the study of prejudice, racial attitudes, and intergroup relations. We will focus on three main questions. First, how do we understand and study prejudice and racism as they relate to U.S. politics? Second, how do group identities, stereotyping, and other factors help us understand the legitimation of discrimination, group hierarchy, and social domination? Third, what are the political and social challenges associated with reducing prejudice?

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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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