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Your search for courses for 23/SP and with code: ARCNPERT found 8 courses.

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ARCN 222.00 Experimental Archaeology and Experiential History 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:30am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64058

Jake N Morton

This course offers an experiential approach to crafts, technologies, and other material practices in premodern societies. Through hands-on activities and collaborations with local craftspeople, farmers, and other experts, this course will examine and test a variety of hypotheses about how people in the past lived their lives. How did prehistoric people produce stone tools, pottery, and metal? How did ancient Greeks and Romans feed and clothe themselves? How did medieval Europeans build their homes and bury their dead? Students will answer these questions and more by actively participating in a range of experimental archaeology and experiential history projects. Lab required.

Prerequisite: One previous Archaeology pertinent course

CLAS 145.00 Ancient Greek Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 64406

Jake N Morton

Greek religion played a crucial role in how the ancient Greeks understood the world around them. Mythology and cosmology shaped their understanding of how the world worked, while the ritual of sacrifice formed the basis of the social fabric underpinning all aspects of Greek society. In this course we will learn about Greece's polytheistic belief system--its gods and religious rites--as well as examining how religion shaped the daily lives of ordinary Greeks, often in surprising ways. We will read the works of ancient authors such as Homer and Hesiod, study the archaeological remains of sacred sites, inscriptions, and curse tablets, as well as engage with experimental archaeology.

ENTS 120.51 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Hulings 316 / CMC 110

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 64739

John L Berini

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 120.WL1 (Synonym 64741)

GEOL 110.52 Introduction to Geology and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 129

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64793

Dan P Maxbauer

An introduction to the fundamental and wondrous processes that shape the Earth. We approach learning through outdoor and laboratory problems, which are often complicated and messy, like the planet itself. Topics may include the formation of rocks, minerals, and mountains, the water cycle, plate tectonics, climate change, volcanoes, and earthquakes. One all-day weekend field trip is typically required. No previous outdoor experience or gear is needed.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken another 100-level Geology course

Held for first year students. Note: Movement between sections is not possible, if sections fill during registration, seats that open are filled from that waitlist

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 110.WL2 (Synonym 64795)

GEOL 110.53 Introduction to Geology and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 129

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am2:00pm6:00pm10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64792

Dan P Maxbauer

An introduction to the fundamental and wondrous processes that shape the Earth. We approach learning through outdoor and laboratory problems, which are often complicated and messy, like the planet itself. Topics may include the formation of rocks, minerals, and mountains, the water cycle, plate tectonics, climate change, volcanoes, and earthquakes. One all-day weekend field trip is typically required. No previous outdoor experience or gear is needed.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken another 100-level Geology course

Sophomore Priority. Note: Movement between sections is not possible, if sections fill during registration, seats that open are filled from that waitlist first.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 110.WL3 (Synonym 64794)

HIST 201.07 Rome Program: Building Power and Piety in Medieval Italy, CE 300-1150 6 credits

William L North

Through site visits, on-site projects, and readings, this course explores the ways in which individuals and communities attempted to give physical and visual form to their religious beliefs and political ambitions through their use of materials, iconography, topography, and architecture. We will also examine how the material legacies of imperial Rome, Byzantium, and early Christianity served as both resources for and constraints on the political, cultural, and religious evolution of the Italian peninsula and especially Rome and its environs from late antiquity through the twelfth century. Among the principal themes will be the development of the cult of saints, the development of the papal power and authority, Christianization, reform, pilgrimage, and monasticism.

Prerequisite: Acceptance to Carleton Rome Program

OCS Rome Program

HIST 338.00 Digital History, Public Heritage & Deep Mapping 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 138

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 65048

Austin P Mason

How do new methods of digital humanities and collaborative public history change our understanding of space and place? This hands-on research seminar will seek answers through a deep mapping of the long history of Northfield, Minnesota, before and after its most well-known era of the late nineteenth-century. Deep mapping is as much archaeology as it is cartography, plumbing the depths of a particular place to explore its diversity through time. Students will be introduced to major theories of space and place as well as their application through technologies such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS), 3D modeling, and video game engines. We will mount a major research project working with the National Register of Historic Places, in collaboration with specialists in public history and community partners.

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 65462

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Anthropology is the study of all human beings in all their diversity, an exploration of what it means to be human throughout the globe. This course helps us to see ourselves, and others, from a new perspective. By examining specific analytic concepts—such as culture—and research methods—such as participant observation—we learn how anthropologists seek to understand, document, and explain the stunning variety of human cultures and ways of organizing society. This course encourages you to consider how looking behind cultural assumptions helps anthropologists solve real world dilemmas.

Sophomore Priority

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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