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Your search for courses for 23/SP and with code: ENTS2SCP found 7 courses.

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ARTH 267.00 Gardens in China and Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 64075

Kathleen M Ryor

A garden is usually defined as a piece of land that is cultivated or manipulated in some way by man for one or more purposes. Gardens often take the form of an aestheticized space that miniaturizes the natural landscape. This course will explore the historical phenomenon of garden building in China and Japan with a special emphasis on how cultural and religious attitudes towards nature contribute to the development of gardens in urban and suburban environments. In addition to studying historical source material, students will be required to apply their knowledge by building both virtual and physical re-creations of gardens.

ARTS 113.01 Field Drawing 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 242

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:45pm1:15pm3:45pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64113

Eleanor M Jensen

A beginning drawing course for students who are interested in developing their skills in drawing from nature, to better see and understand their surroundings. Class material covers line, form, dimension, value, perspective, and space using a variety of drawing materials. Subject matter includes specimens, plant forms, and the landscape. Students will use a portable sketchbook, and classes during the second part of the term are primarily outside. Locations include the Arb and field trips; access to these sites does include walking on unpaved paths and uneven terrain.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ARTS 113.WL1 (Synonym 64115)

ARTS 113.02 Field Drawing 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 242

MTWTHF
9:00am11:30am9:00am11:30am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 64114

Eleanor M Jensen

A beginning drawing course for students who are interested in developing their skills in drawing from nature, to better see and understand their surroundings. Class material covers line, form, dimension, value, perspective, and space using a variety of drawing materials. Subject matter includes specimens, plant forms, and the landscape. Students will use a portable sketchbook, and classes during the second part of the term are primarily outside. Locations include the Arb and field trips; access to these sites does include walking on unpaved paths and uneven terrain.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ARTS 113.WL2 (Synonym 64116)

ENTS 210.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Colleen M Carpenter

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

ENTS 249.00 Troubled Waters 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65957

Colleen M Carpenter

This course considers the contrast between the ways various religions conceive of water as sacred, and the fact that today’s intersecting environmental crises mean that drought, flooding, sea level rise, and lack of access to clean water and safe sanitation have made the human relationship with water more fraught and complex than ever before. We will look at specific situations of environmental injustice (including Flint, Michigan; Jackson, Mississippi; and the protests at Standing Rock) as well as reading more theoretical and theological takes on water, water justice, and water activism.

POSC 333.00 Global Social Changes and Sustainability* 6 credits

Tun Myint

This course is about the relationship between social changes and ecological changes to understand and to be able to advance analytical concepts, research methods, and theories of society-nature interactions. How do livelihoods of individuals and groups change over time and how do the changes affect ecological sustainability? What are the roles of human institutions in ecological sustainability? What are the roles of ecosystem dynamics in institutional sustainability? Students will learn fundamental theories and concepts that explain linkages between social change and environmental changes and gain methods and skills to measure social changes qualitatively and quantitatively.

Extra Time required.

RELG 243.00 Native American Religious Freedom 6 credits

Michael D McNally

This course explores historical and legal contexts in which Native Americans have practiced their religions in the United States. Making reference to the cultural background of Native traditions, and the history of First Amendment law, the course explores landmark court cases in Sacred Lands, Peyotism, free exercise in prisons, and sacralized traditional practices (whaling, fishing, hunting) and critically examines the conceptual framework of "religion" as it has been applied to the practice of Native American traditions. Service projects will integrate academic learning and student involvement in matters of particular concern to contemporary native communities.

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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