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Your search for courses for 23/SP and with code: HISTASIA found 4 courses.

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HIST 112.00 Freedom of Expression: A Global History 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 63948

Amna Khalid

Celebrated as the bedrock of democracy, freedom of expression is often seen as an American or western value. Yet the concept has a rich and global history. In this course we will track the long and turbulent history of freedom of expression from ancient Athens and medieval Islamic societies to the Enlightenment and the drive for censorship in totalitarian and colonial societies. Among the questions we will consider are: How have the parameters of free expression changed and developed over time? What is the relationship between free speech and political protest? How has free speech itself been weaponized? How does an understanding of the history of free speech help us think about the challenges of combating hatred and misinformation in today’s internet age?

Applies to multiple history fields, consult the instructor

HIST 150.00 Politics of Art in Early Imperial China 6 credits

Seungjoo Yoon

Poetry has been playing an important role in politics from early China down to the present. Members of the educated elite have used this form of artistic expression to create political allegories in times of war and diplomacy. Students will learn the multiple roles that poet-censors played in early imperial China, with thematic attention given to issues of self and ethnic/gendered identity, internal exile and nostalgia, and competing religious orientations that eventually fostered the rise of Neo-Confucianism. Students will write a short biography of a poet by sampling her/his poems and poetics (all in translation) from the common reading pool.

HIST 154.00 Social Movements in Postwar Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 66071

Seungjoo Yoon

This course tackles an evolving meaning of democracy and sovereignty in postwar Japan shaped by the transformative power of its social movements. We will place the anti-nuclear movement and anti-base struggles of the 1950s, the protest movements against revision of the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty of the 1960s, and environmentalist movements against the U.S. Cold War projects in Asia to see how they intersect with the worldwide “New Left” movements of the 1960s. Topics include student activism, labor unionism, Marxist movements, and gangsterism (yakuza). Students will engage with political art, photographs, manga, films, reportage, memoirs, autobiographies, interview records, novels, and detective stories.

HIST 269.00 Religion, Race & Caste in Modern India 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 65656

Brendan P LaRocque

This course will examine the history of religious beliefs, practices, and community, European imperialist and Orientalist ideologies, and the socio-political implications of anti-colonial nationalist movements in India. We will address questions including: How did the European powers justify their imperial undertaking through specific concepts of race, religion, science and technology?  How did the imperial experience impact Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism, and caste, race, and gender in India?  In the post-colonial period we will examine the powerful growth of low-caste and anti-caste social movements and political parties, as well as religious nationalist, pluralist, and secular mass-movements.

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